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      These Forums are closing!   10/04/2019

      After more than a decade of serving this community well, these forums have finally run their course and it's time to close them down. That doesn't mean we want to close the doors on our community, quite the opposite!
      Our discord server grows ever busier by the day, and we encourage all Double Fine fans to meet us over there www.discord.gg/doublefine In a short time these forums will become a read only archive and will remain that way until they become needed again.
      You never know, it might happen.  There is... a prophecy. Thank you all for being part of these forums, and remember that the fun is definitely not over - so please join us on Discord! Love ya, Spaff, Tim, Info Cow, and all of Double Fine.

fork

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  1. Create a giveaway on steamgifts.com. There are ~500,000 members there, and at the very least many will check out the Steam page to see what the game is about. BUT, to get some more hype, you can create a ‘puzzle’ in the forums that eventually leads to the giveaway. People drool over this stuff, and it’s a fun way to get people to possibly visit the DF site or tweet about the game. Also, creating puzzles is perfect for leading up to an adventure game giveaway Usually the puzzles consist of steganography and decoding messages, hiding stuff in source code on websites, in images and metadata on free hosting sites, riddles on pastebin, etc. Maybe there could be one step in the puzzle that requires a Twitter post about Broken Age, and if a specific hashtag is included they’ll be sent the next step of the puzzle. Or there could be hints scattered in the webpage source code of other DF games (requires DF staff to be involved, of course). Lots of opportunity for mild marketing.
  2. In the latest episode, it seems like DF is hoping backers will help get the word out about Broken Age. Post here if you have any ideas to spread the good news! Here's my idea: Create a giveaway on steamgifts.com. There are ~500,000 members there, and at the very least many will check out the Steam page to see what the game is about. BUT, to get some more hype, you can create a 'puzzle' in the forums that eventually lead to the giveaway. People drool over this stuff, and it's a fun way to get people to possibly visit the DF site or tweet about the game. Also, creating puzzles is perfect for leading up to an adventure game giveaway Usually the puzzles consist of steganography and decoding messages, hiding stuff in source code on websites, in images and metadata on free hosting sites, riddles on pastebin, etc. Maybe there could be one step in the puzzle that requires a Twitter post about Broken Age, and if a specific hashtag is included they'll be sent the next step of the puzzle. Or there could be hints scattered in the webpage source code of other DF games. Lots of opportunity for mild marketing. Anyone who supports the game and/or DF have other ideas?
  3. Could be that we the gamers are Shay in a way, in that we're coddled until we're ready. I agree that many of the puzzles were easy. A few of them, I was just handed the solution to a puzzle by going through all of the dialogue choices, and for others there are huge wink-wink dialogue hints that made me think "Let me solve it myself!" The only puzzle I had difficulty with was (spoiler) the final fight with Mog Chothra, and that's only because the game randomly decided to break logic - why would Mog pick Vella up, and decide he doesn't want to open his mouth just because he had one arm? I thought it was a bug, because I knew what I needed to do but the game didn't act as I reasonably expected. (/spoiler) That said, consider that Act 1 & 2 were originally supposed to be released as a whole game. Act 1 could be seen as the weaning period, where characters and plot are introduced, and Act 2 is where the meatier puzzles are once the mechanics and the game world are established. Many games are much easier in the first portion, and ramp up difficulty once the player is comfortable with the game logic. There are some commenters out there who were truly stumped on some puzzles in the first act, so it means the difficulty is sort of set at "Goldilocks" - easy for veterans, and approachable but not frustrating for newcomers. Noone walks away too upset, because the difficulty isn't at either extreme. The niche market of hardcore adventure gamers have probably already spent their money on the game, and that money went into getting the game created. The broader market, the average gamer who might not have had the chance to experience adventure games before, need to be included too. DF should be able to reap the rewards of making a well-balanced, accessible game, which means they can't just cater to the wishes of the diehard fans. This only holds if Act 2 actually is a bit more challenging though. I see the strong and interesting story as the savior for easy puzzles in the first act. It also looks like the second act will have a more complicated narrative - lots of loose ends and problems need to be tied up - which means more creative problem solving. Or so I hope
  4. I had the same issue. Finished Vella's section, saved right after the first cutscene for Shay. The save game always brings me straight into the beginning of Vella's section. Luckily I had a backup save for the final fight.
  5. Shay finds the lumberjack as a paltry shell of a man due to his detox diet, and helps him make a huge stool by bringing him the high fiber and nutrient rich bark of a puking, sap-filled tree. Lumberjack is so exhausted from moving his stool that he collapses, to be haunted by dreams of shrieking trees forever more. Shay is able to get past the snake by lubricating himself with the tears made from crushed hopes of the never-to-be-mayor of Shellmound, who was kicked out of the town by locals shamed by the disastrous Maiden Ceremony and forced out of their jobs from the exclusive use of foreign-made sand stabilizer. Beyond the snake, Shay is found by local residents of Sugar Bunting and put to trial as a witch. Knife, finally able to cleave the infinite madness of space itself, is found spiritually broken from the realization that he was only a tool in a false reality. Driven to insanity by the thankless life of slavery they were forced into, the Hexagon people on Shay's ship imprison Vella by forcing her through a teleporter 4 times and keeping her under a cup on the dirty kitchen floor. Sustained only by the few CinnaMoons found on the floor that the auto-vacuum missed, Vella's dialogue is reduced to heaving cries of sorrow and munching sounds. *insert happy ending here*
  6. Yea, I know what you mean. Some areas only had a couple of hotspots, and since there's only one interaction button, there's generally only one response. I ended up using my entire inventory on just about everything, just to see some more responses - and I wasn't disappointed. I love having tons of hotspots to check out - it really does wonders for immersion and game lore, or just to make opportunities for one-off jokes. I'm hoping for a little more interactivity in the next act. I feel like voice acting really limits how many cool responses there could be, since each line sort of has a price tag on DF's end. Old adventure games were usually text-only, allowing those ridiculously huge branching dialogues like in Monkey Island. Voice acting limitations link into puzzle simplicity - everything has to be straightforward and serve some purpose, or else they'd have to cage up voice actors for months doing thousands of lines of dialogue for every little thing. It's a shame, and a difficult reality that DF has to carefully balance finances with content. But I feel that the quality of the story makes up for most of these minor shortcomings, and there's still another act yet to be released.
  7. Not going to lie - I was initially confused by the ending. I played through Vella's part first, and when I beat Shay's story and the final cutscene played, my first thought was "but Shay couldn't breathe in space when I cut the air hose (before solving the whole puzzle), and could fly around as if he was in space." So I guess the inside of the Mog is some airless low-gravity vacuum when its mouth is closed or something? Or were they actually in space in between Maiden Feasts? Yet Shay was still "floaty" when his ship got shot and his helmet came off - the Mog's mouth would've been open then, and in the planet's atmosphere. If the Fusion Orb or the "ship's shield" (maybe a cloaking device to enable Mog mode?) were somehow linked to emulating space, then Shay still shouldn't have been able to float in the end game. I guess what confused me was everything in Shay's world acted like it was in space, but shouldn't have acted that way some of the time since he was really in the same world as Vella. I really try not to overthink games too much, but the ending took me off-guard because of this. Otherwise, a lot of things clicked in the story for me in the final scene (when I got over "fake space"). The story turned out to be much more complex than what it first seemed to be - which is a huge plus for me! It definitely makes up for the generally easy puzzles. Also, I hope some of the scenes that didn't get much attention in Act 1 turn out to be more useful in Act 2. Among other things, I'm really hoping for a Cloud Colony revolution - it seemed weird that Vella didn't feel like sharing the ladder to the ground with the people who made it clear they didn't want to stay up there. All in all, great job DF Team! I'm going to go make a nice stool to pass the time in preparation for Act 2.
  8. You can send in your save to support@doublefine.com, as per here: http://www.doublefine.com/forums/viewthread/11623/
  9. *pats you on the back* I had the exact same issue, don't worry. Seemed kind of a forced puzzle, since he opens his mouth every other time...
  10. There is a manual save option already.
  11. Don't know if there was already supposed to be anything like this, but when you try and grab the Beast Hooker, one of the maidens grabs it and uses it - but there's no spray nor sound effect. The spray effect/sound effect would help the scene - I know these components already sort of exist, as there's a similar effect when the Temple guard first tries to use the teargas sprayer.
  12. After talking to Gus for the first time, I clicked on his underwear (or may have accidentally clicked past him and started walking past, but my intention was to touch his underwear...!), and the bird rescue animation immediately started playing (without Vella showing up), while the dialogue of Gus pushing Vella off looped. This sequence kept looping until I hit spacebar. I couldn't reproduce this again. Operating System: Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit (6.1, Build 7601) Service Pack 1 (7601.win7sp1_gdr.130828-1532) Processor: Intel® Core i5-2500K CPU @ 3.30GHz (4 CPUs), ~3.3GHz Chip type: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 560 Ti Display Mode: 1920 x 1080 (32 bit) (60Hz) Installed from Steam.
  13. If you fall through the clouds near the tree, you can click on the doorway below before the bird cutscene plays - doing this instantly teleports (no animations) Vella to beside the tree, upper level.
  14. When first reaching Cloud Colony, you can talk to the guy wearing a nest around his neck and ask about Brother Lightbeard, even though he was never previously mentioned. Sort of confused me, but it made sense eventually.