Jenni

Moderator
  • Content count

    2,231
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by Jenni

  1. I'm glad about that. It's really the perfect Superman theme, with it's booming, in your face melody, which fits Superman. Just as Elfman's own theme for Batman is perfect for that character as it's dark and foreboding, and gradually gets more intense, like Batman himself. Hopefully the film takes a cue from the Christopher Reeves films too, and give more of a classic Superman, that would better fit this theme music. Honestly, the DC movie Universe could really stand to have a hero like that, with a Superman who's not afraid to be a symbol for good.
  2. Sorry. My post was quite vague as to who bought TMNT. I meant that the price Saban paid for Power Rangers was believed to be about the price Viacom (the parent of Nickelodeon) paid for Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. I don't think a Kickstarter would be something that Disney would be interested in, either. Plus, since Sony was said to have sought the rights to all of the LucasArts adventures, I really doubt Sony would be too thrilled to dip back into those waters again after the Shenmue III backlash. Honestly, I think Double Fine might theoretically tackle a Monkey Island game if Sony did the grunt work dealing with Disney and they partially funded the game as well. I really can't see Terrible Toybox going that route though. Ron doesn't seem like he's too thrilled with the prospect of publishers these days. If there ever was a hypethetical Double Fine Monkey Island though, I'd imagine Tim would try to get Ron on board, at least with the initial story and design - as Ron did with Telltale for Tales of Monkey Island (and, since we're going full out hypothetical here, Dave Grossman could be a possibility too, even though he's now at Earplay, judging from the fact that he was the co-designer of Duke Grabowski).
  3. Disney won't just give away the rights, and Ron Gilbert won't be able to purchase the Monkey Island IP for a price that Disney would accept. When Disney sold Power Rangers back to Saban, it was believed to be at around the price paid for Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles - $60 million. And that was only sold because "it didn't fit with the Disney brand". Considering Monkey Island is influenced by Pirates of the Caribbean, that sentiment wouldn't be true for that IP. Plus, the Monkey Island special editions are in the top 10 of the Disney published games in digital sales. So, Disney isn't just sitting on the IP like it was with Power Rangers. So, $60 million would probably be the low end figure - it's likely they'd want to sell it for even more than that. The most we could hope for is that Sony works out a deal with Disney for Terrible Toybox, Double Fine, or another company to make a new Monkey Island game, since the rights to the franchise are likely to stay with Disney.
  4. Board games!

    I enjoy gin rummy, but I've never played 13 cards rummy. I do like trying out variations on games, so I'll give that one a try. On the subject of card games, I've recently been playing Microsoft Solitaire Collection, which has five variations of Solitaire: Klondike, Freecell, Spider, Pyramid, and Tripeaks. I also recently picked up Back to the Future: The Card Game, which is a cross between a card game and a board game. You are given a character card, which all contain a descendent of a character from the films. The object of the game is to flip Linchpins along the timeline to change the past or the future. Linchpins also flip ripplepoints farther down the timeline. After a player has changed history to match the history needed on their character card, in order to preserve their existence, they must prevent the flux capacitor from being invented by Emmett Brown. At that point they are declared the winner of the game. I'm a huge Back to the Future nerd, so I also picked up the Back to the Future board game that Smiths Crisps gave out in the UK in 1985.
  5. hey guys post more im bored

    I like to keep my songs under 5 minutes in my playlist. I've actually edited songs to trim them down - such as classical songs and Jimi Hendrix.
  6. The Double Fine Group Of Doubly Fine Writings

    I do this sometimes. I have a sketch book that I usually use just to make random drawings in, but sometimes I visualize various stories I have written, even in my comic stories - as they are usually just the characters talking. I've since used two of these drawings in a comic. I drew the generational ship from Fluidity In Space, the unfinished story that I posted here earlier. I actually have two concepts - one is a scientifically accurate solar ship inspired by a NASA mockup, and the other is a ship that's more like a ship with sails. The first is the one I picture in my head for the story, but the second one is neat too.
  7. hey guys post more im bored

    Would anyone mind if I pulled out the Firewatch/Pewdiepie/Steam bombing from here and the Telltale thread and merged it into a new thread? It's super confusing as it is, since the same discussion is happening in both threads.
  8. Grim Fandango wall mural - Now at poster size!

    Adventure-Treff still hosts Laserschwert's posters, but they changed the link. It's here now: http://www.adventure-treff.de/Features/14067-hochaufloesende-adventure-poster I also updated the first post in this thread with working links.
  9. Futurama!

    D'oh. I forgot to link the episode when it aired. That was a pretty fun episode. I hope they do more podcast episodes in the future.
  10. Draw Your Own Creepy Treats!

    With apologies to @Spaff, I had to draw this when it popped into my head.
  11. To be fair, if the person in question makes Lets Plays or playthroughs of games, then the DMCA was warranted. In that scenario, it's likely that Sony filed their takedown through the Entertainment Software Association body, which includes both Sony and Nintendo. Lets Plays and Long Plays and Playthroughs have been accepted on YouTube by most game companies, but that's just because either the companies that allow it are super awesome, or because they like the publicity, or both. These companies are well within their rights to stop Lets Plays and Playthroughs from being uploaded, since they own the video content. The YouTubers who do Lets Plays and Playthroughs can't claim fair use, as they could a review, as reviews only contain snippets of video and/or audio from a game, and Lets Plays and Playthroughs contain footage of the entire game. Commentary is not a significant departure from the game itself. It's been stated that the bigger companies file requests for YouTube takedowns via DMCA laws to protect their trademarks, which is completely understandable. Trademark law is a tricky beast. They could actually lose their trademark if they were to openly allow these videos, as trademark law in the United States requires proof that you continually actively protect your trademark. The YouTube takedown notices supply the proof. The best way around this is when monetizing content is to avoid copyright infringement as much as possible. As my statement above notes, that's the reason RiffTrax supplies audio of their commentary when they don't have permission to sync the audio with the video. Any Lets Player who supplied audio to be synced with player-supplied video wouldn't have any problem with DMCA takedowns. Alternatively, they could only post playthroughs from companies that have outright stated that they allow Lets Plays, or get permission from the developers directly. That's always the best way to go when you want to make money by commenting on someone else's work.
  12. That's YouTube's takedown system, not the DMCA laws. They are within their rights as a United States company to require another company that operates within the United States to remove a video that contains a video playthrough of their content on a channel that they feel misrepresents their game and their brand. Besides, it's not actually that hard to get a turnaround of the three strikes rule if you contest it with YouTube. I successfully did so on one of my YouTube channels, and the channel in question was used to post nothing but clips from copyrighted content that I don't own.
  13. This isn't abusing the DMCA laws at all. Campo Santo owns their game material, they can claim to take anything down they feel misrepresents their game and their brand. They don't want him to profit from their game, and they don't want to profit from his video commentary of their game. They are perfectly within their rights to do that. PewDiePie owns the audio commentary in his Lets Play, but Campo Santo owns the game footage. It's akin to RiffTrax's audio commentary of films. They don't release their audio commentary on video, but instead release it via digital audio formats, unless they get the rights to use the film footage, or it is in the public domain. If PewDiePie were releasing audio to be synced with game footage, like RiffTrax, then, yeah Campo Santo would be abusing the DMCA laws. As it stands though, they're just doing what they feel they need to do to maintain the credibility of their game and their company, which is well within their rights to do so. Right. The problem is how easily the word came out of his mouth. Only a racist would ever use that word, period. It wouldn't even be in the vocabulary of someone who isn't a racist. The same goes with his jokes about killing Jews, in particular his skit that contained the "death to Jews" sign. That skit wasn't satire, it was just made for the shock value. No one who is not anti-Semitic would ever use a people who had been murdered in the millions as shock humor, especially not within the lifetimes of Jewish people who lived through that horror.
  14. It's actually not the first time that PewDiePie's racism is being reported by the media. Disney dropped him from his MakerStudios contract due to his anti-semetic and racist jokes. His YouTube Red Series was cancelled due to the racist and anti-semetic content. He was also removed him from the Google Preferred Ads program due to racist and anti-semetic content. Pewdiepie has a long, long history of racism and I'm not surprised at all that companies don't want to participate in monetizing his videos.
  15. Futurama!

    Futurama's coming back as an audio play called Radiorama, and will be played on the Nerdist podcast on September 14, 2017. It's about a routine trip to Klaxxon 7, the deleted file planet, gone wrong, causing the Planet Express crew to have to battle an evil being made up entirely of soundwaves from podcasts from the 21st century. The entire cast is on-board for the episode, and Nerdist's Chris Hardwick voices the villain. It's sponsored by TinyCo's Quest for Stuff clone, Futurama: Worlds of Tomorrow. There's a one minute clip from the episode available via soundcloud: This actually sounds like a pretty good idea for a new episode, considering Futurama's name comes from an attraction at the 1939 World's Fair.
  16. My 6 year old nephew loves Minecraft: Story Mode. He can't really handle Minecraft yet, since he has a real short expansion span, so building would make him bored quickly. He even has troubles staying focused on some of the puzzles in Story Mode. He just likes the characters and the world, since he watches the kids playing it on YouTube.
  17. 10

    Indeed it does. It's actually pretty amazing that it's still in operation after 20 years. That's like 200 years in Internet Timeβ„’.
  18. I have a Switch - with Zelda: Breath of the Wild, Mario Kart 7 Deluxe, Splatoon 2, Minecraft: Story Mode - The Complete Adventure, and the NEO GEO ACA games Super Sidekicks and Puzzled. I actually like it quite a bit. I wish they had internet apps on it like Netflix and Hulu though, then I'd probably use it as my main device instead of my tablet.
  19. It summed me up perfectly. I prefer story games, and don't like playing online with people unless it's cooperative (I play Splatoon 2's online because it's team-based, and I've played Rock Band online in the past since you all play together on a song). And, yes, I do enjoy different game types (and trying new things in real-life). My favorite genres are Adventure games, Platformers, Racing games, RPGs, and action-adventures. I sometimes play fighting games too (I've played new Killer Instinct quite a bit).
  20. 10

    Also, I helped out @Spaff with the website he founded, The International House of Mojo, and I had a site hosted by him way back in the 1990s when we were both teenagers. So, he's probably somewhere around my age. I still help out at Mojo, but he's got better things to do these days
  21. 10

    Maybe? I'm 38, but I'm not sure if I'm the oldest. I know I wasn't the oldest member at the Telltale forums, but I'm not sure if those that were older than me made it over here as well.
  22. 10

    My 10 year anniversary here will come in October next year. Then the year after that, my 20 year anniversary will come at the LucasForums (if they ever return from the dead).
  23. hey guys post more im bored

    Ha! That's great.
  24. The Screw-on-Head animation looks neat, but it utilises a more limited animation technique (especially in the mouth movement), and looks quite rigid in the animation of the human characters. The action scenes look pretty good, though there is definitely room to improve in the closeups of the people, and this animation is a lot more limited than the quality Warner Bros. Animation puts out with its DC Universe films (the action scenes look nice, but the scenes with the human characters remind me of a motion comic, albeit a very well done motion comic). This is very true. The more realistic a drawing becomes, the harder it is to translate into two-dimensional animation. There are recent improvements in combining three-dimensional lighting techniques on a two-dimensional plane for two-dimensional animation, but we're still a ways off when it comes to utilising three-dimensional animation techniques on a two dimensional plane in a fluid and realistic manner when it comes to two-dimensional character animation. I doubt that it could ever be done traditionally, as even the animation masters such as Max Fleischer and Don Bluth struggled with this. It's one of the reasons why the legends of animation such as Ub Iwerks and Chuck Jones animated characters with unrealistic qualities such as squash-and-stretch. The cartoonish character designs actually look more lively when doing unrealistic movements. The opposite would be true for more realistic designs. You'd have to stick to realistic movement, and that's hard to come across in two dimensional animation without the image looking rigid or stiff There's a lot of interesting commentary available on this in regards to Snow White and the Seven Dwarves. They were able to give Snow White more of the movements that the animators were used to doing in their shorts, as her arm movements could be a little more rubbery when it came to her dancing. And, of course, the Dwarves used a cartoonish design, so that wasn't a problem with them. But, with the Prince, he had to be the prim and proper type, so using the rubbery animation on him looked odd, and the animators struggled with making his animation look believable without looking stiff and rigid. If you look at the Disney princes after Snow White and the Seven Dwarves, they adopted a softer, rounded look, that allowed them to use a more rubbery animation without it looking odd and off-putting.
  25. hey guys post more im bored

    I just got an Ion portable suitcase turntable to play the vinyl records I purchased from the Double Fine shop. I also picked up the deluxe soundtracks for the Guardians of the Galaxy films on vinyl, as I couldn't get myself to purchase them on a more modern format. The turntable is USB chargeable, can be connected to a computer to convert the songs to digital format, has an auxiliary input so other media players can be attached, and it has built in speakers. It is surprisingly well made and the speakers sound quite good, considering it cost less than $100. Acclimatize is a valid variation of acclimate: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/acclimatize. As is acclimitise, for those people outside the United States.