esnoeijs

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About esnoeijs

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  1. 1) Leverage youtube celebs. Totalbiscuit (1.5M subscribers), yogscast (6.6M subscribers), Geek & Sundry (will weaton/800k subs). Don't just give them a copy to review and have fun but do an interview/co-op play, that way they will hopefully feature it and more likely then not be nice about it. In this day and age youtube celebs are getting millions of hits and that's a ton of exposure. 2) Check from feedback how many people are playing this game with their children and based on that perhaps introduce more localized text versions depending on cost. If this is indeed a hit with parents wanting a good/easy friendly game to play with their children having it in as many languages as possible could be a good way to increase that potential buyer market. 3) Depending on how the rights are with the documentary, leverage the fuck out of that thing. The documentary sells the game so well. Like another person said, making it free to watch after some date to boost sales again would be great. Although would probably also incur some backlash from backers who feel that they paid for a by then free documentary. 4) After some point when the initial steam sales have sagged and perhaps before Act2 is about to come out create an "adventure pack" consisting of a bunch of adventure games including broken age, and some of the other indy adventure games that have come out in recent years. Via humble bundle or something. Will probably not make a lot of money but will raise awareness about the game before Act2 comes out anyway.
  2. Great, now retroactively feel bad for saying the puzzles where a bit too easy in one of the "how did you find the game" threads. I can just picture Tim reading that thread and crying a single tear with every post until he suffers from severe dehydration and has to get a drink. Although that would also mean getting up a lot to refill his mug and they do say exercise is good for you, so perhaps there's a positive in everything. But seriously this documentary is really making this so worth it for me. I find it fascinating to see the process and the story behind the game. Don't worry the game by itself is great too, but the documentary makes me glad I backed it via kickstarter. This also really seems to be a trend among the "successful" kickstarters or at least those that people talk about (which obviously isn't necessarily the same thing) that lots of transparency is the key to keep people interested and excited.
  3. The game was fun, the world was beautiful and interesting, the conversations funny. But the puzzles felt too easy, at some points it felt like I was simply going trough the motions. At some point the puzzles did get a little bit more difficult, but only once did I actually get to feel that "aha!" moment after being stuck for a little bit (The last puzzle for the Vella part). Overall I enjoyed the Vella part much more then the shane part. Because of the variety of locations it felt bigger and more diverse. After getting to the end of both parts and ending Act1 I felt it was sort of worth it. The twist is great and I can't wait to explore Act2. Now puzzles are obviously difficult to get right in terms of difficulty, but with the limited space and items it just felt a little bit too streamlined to solve. I'm by no means an adventure game expert and I'll fully admit to having played out the monkey islands with a printed out walktrough besides me. But for my liking the puzzles could have been a bit harder. But other then that I had a blast, steam informs me that it took me 3 hours to play out Act1 but it felt like 5 or 6 hours. (and not because it was boring) Favourite character by far the woodchopper. The conversation about the ornament on the wall was just perfect.