enigma

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Everything posted by enigma

  1. I might try that, if for nothing else than because I like to tinker. Maybe over the weekend. And yeah, it's an Athlon 64 X2 4200+ (2x2.2Ghz), the Manchester processor. So not really "recent", though it's been holding up astonishingly well. It'll probably see its ten year anniversary before I get around building a new system, heh.
  2. Sure. The answer is that it won't run. On startup, it calls GetLocaleInfoEx from the Windows Kernel32.dll, which is available only since Vista. Unless someone knows a way to force it to ignore that error, that's it. Pity -- I would have liked to play it. Now I have to wait until I'm with a Win7 machine later next month.@Vic & Greg -- if you could quickly reprogram it to use GetLocaleInfo instead, I'd be much obliged Like I said, it's the 2GB Ram which I can't change. XP @2GB is great. Win 7 @2GB is not enough if you want to use it reasonably. The OS itself takes too much of it.
  3. Exactly the information I wanted. Thanks a lot
  4. Vic, is there anything you can say regarding what I asked?
  5. @ThunderPeel: Entirely my laziness and (to a certain degree) unwillingness to spend money for new hardware, since I currently don't really need it. Which also answers your question: To this date, I've managed to get every game I wanted to play to run on XP (including Broken Age, naturally). Though admittedly, I'm not gaming much these days, and I'll probably run into compatibility issues sooner rather than later now. I'm just hoping it won't be Grim Fandango Remastered @MarkoH01: What the others said; you can have 4 GB (provided your board supports it; mine doesn't), but you'll only be able to use 3.2 - 3.5 GB of it. The thing is, though, if it does run with XP, chances are you won't need the 4GB. Because XP itself uses a lot less memory than Windows 7 does, leaving more of it for other applications. Which, incidentally, is the reason I haven't upgraded; I've got 2GB Ram which is a lot for XP, but just barely allows 7 to run in a decent manner (with enough memory left for larger applications).
  6. Greg, any idea whether there's something fundamentally preventing it from running on WinXP, or whether it's just not listed because you don't offer any official support for it?
  7. Successful or No?

    As it happens, I write. But that is entirely besides the point and wasn't what I meant. Do note that I said "every useful creative process". And that is a no-brainer, because the fundamental starting point of a creative process that isn't a self-purpose (i.e. not not of use for something in the strictest sense) is a problem that needs solving. Thus, "it should be a solution to this" is the build-in in the premise; in regards to Broken Age the problem is "I want to write a video-game" and, arguably, "I want to write an adventure game", so your "it should have that"s are "it should be a video game" and "it should be an adventure game". Without those clear defined expectations, Tim could as well have spent time trying to write an opera or a pop song. It strikes me as exceedingly unlikely that he did that.
  8. Successful or No?

    As it happens, I write. But that is entirely besides the point and wasn't what I meant. Do note that I said "every useful creative process". And that is a no-brainer, because the fundamental starting point of a creative process that isn't a self-purpose (i.e. not not of use for something in the strictest sense) is a problem that needs solving. Thus, "it should be a solution to this" is the build-in in the premise; in regards to Broken Age the problem is "I want to write a video-game" and, arguably, "I want to write an adventure game", so your "it should have that"s are "it should be a video game" and "it should be an adventure game". Without those clear defined expectations, Tim could as well have spent time trying to write an opera or a pop song. It strikes me as exceedingly unlikely that he did that.
  9. Successful or No?

    Well, I suppose. If you want to call expecting an Adventure when you're offered an Adventure "rigidity" ... (generally speaking) Leaving aside that this thread wasn't the is-it-what-we-asked-for thread, your argument runs into trouble when you start talking about people inside the adventure genre and end up arguing something about all people, since the reason for the decreased prominence of adventure games would have to do with the overall share of players, not with a part of that share. If you bothered to, you could indeed make the reverse argument by pointing to the success of the (oldschool-AG) Kickstarters. @OANST: "Organic" approaches to art are overrated. "It should have that" is the start and vital part of every useful creative process ever.
  10. Successful or No?

    @taumel: Don't believe in dreams but in reality, and you won't end up disappointed. It's as simple as that.
  11. Successful or No?

    He can't decide what he wants either, can he? In various interviews during the release, he denied that the revenue of the first part would be needed to fund the second one. That made the decision to split the game rather strange, but still, it was what he said.
  12. Well, you can extend that to other stuff, like having time-critical puzzles. It's different philosophies. Since adventure games are defined by the pre-existing story you are playing, you can, if you take that in the strictest sense, make a case that there shouldn't be an element that lets you actually fail, unless that was the way the story goes. Conversely, if you defined it to be part of the game-mechanics (i.e. the puzzles) and not the story, the argument'd be moot. From a player's POV, I don't mind either way too much, provided game-overs are used sparingly and not overly unfair. Auto-saves takes care of the latter, and the former would mean I'd in any case only use it with the snake (because that is just funny) and the Mog Chothra. I mean, functionally, it's not that much of a difference: in the current version, you get grabbed and kick yourself free to start over, with an auto-save, you'd end up swallowed, game-over'd, and then would start over. But to answer you other question: Yeah, I actually did feel some excitement during the Mog Chothra fight, because you end up caught up in the moment, actual death or not.
  13. Successful or No?

    In so far as it's a scary thing how (little) video games are valued these days. That was what he meant. I happen to agree -- video games used to cost more, and you'd get something like "sales" only after years. Today, you don't even want to pay this lowered full price because you know there'll be a sale with 50% off after a few months, and if it's a game for a mobile device, people can't even demand more than a few bucks in the first place.A consequence of that is that games have gotten shorter and perhaps it also gave rise to the whole casual thing. I'd honestly prefer if games became longer again, cost $50 - $100, had that price for a couple of years (and shipped in boxes). But I guess those times are over.
  14. Successful or No?

    You just proved MichaelM's point.
  15. I cut back and forth. Starting with Vella, playing her until she reaches the clouds. Then Shay until he meets Marek for the second time and gets the first mission. Then Vella @Meriloft until she ends up with Curtis, then Shay till the end (I think), then Vella till the end. But you see that when you play. Basically, whenever there was a dramatic moment, I changed perspective. Whether that's a better experience ... I dunno, depends on you, I guess. I had fun switching and arranging the stories, was a bit like playing director But I guess it's not strictly necessary.
  16. Did you get stuck at all?

    Well, that's because it isn't. You can't save something by killing it. If every adventure game had its rubber duck puzzle, the world would be better place.
  17. Well, you can. I just wanted to help you avoid using a bad argument that on top of that isn't even needed. But knock yourself out. What cultural differences? Between all of Europe and the rest of the world? And you just shifted the argument. Originally, your claim was that "I don’t believe it’s all that common to read stories that open with ritualistic sacrifice to children", to which I pointed out that there are children's stories that deal with even more supposedly "shocking" themes, seeing that you were talking about the act as such, and not the presentation of it. The argument was thus invalidated. Now you're talking about the presentation. But even so, since you're now arguing it's not a children's story because it's not what stories for children are typically like (as opposed to arguing it's not a children's story because it is unsuitable for children, which would be logically straight-forward but doesn't fit this game), the argument goes nowhere because that is a matter of opinion (why can't there be nuanced stories for children too?). Also, just so that we're not blowing it out of proportion: The story is nice, and I don't agree it's a story specifically aimed at children, but it's not the next Nobel Price candidate. Vella's part is "girl doesn't want to get eaten by monster so she decided to fight it instead", while Shay's is "boy is bored and wants to have adventures". Every child ever can get behind that. The possible subtleties (consequences of "fighting") are, all things considered, so far rather microscopic. It's silly to argue the story is bad because it's a story for children, because that argument is bad (the quality of a story certainly doesn't depend on its supposed target audience). But this also means that any argument that engages this bad argument can't be much better either. (And I'm going to ignore the "I knew someone would respond and wanted to make that point ..."-part, as that is a quite dishonest way to argue.)
  18. Yeah, well. I'd rather you'd not use that argument. You don't even need to go there to see that could spawn an entire thread on its own. Suffice to say that while I heartily dislike that book myself, I also don't think children only need to be told stories of fairies and rainbows either. One of Astrid Lindgrens's best books (The Brothers Lionheart) deals with the topic of dying, and it's certainly a children's book. In this case, as it's a coming-of-age story, I suppose you could pass it off as YA, but I wouldn't hesitate to let younger kids play it either. The problem there is possibly a lack of understanding of deeper themes, depending on the age, but not the content as such. In the end, it's missing the point, though -- complaining that it's a story for children is still silly. Complain that it's a bad story, and we can discuss it.
  19. @nsbane: That wasn't me, that was @concrete duck Thanks for compliments, though. I have a feeling @suejak doesn't much like compound adjectives, at least without hyphens, but it's probably tangential to the topic at hand.
  20. Another solid review (RPS)

    The best review I came across so far is this one: http://www.pcworld.com/article/2089242/broken-age-act-one-review-kickstarters-darling-is-a-charming-shallow-half-game.html Not least because they refuse to actually rate it. All things considered, that's really the most fair way to go about it. And I hate reducing a game to a number anyway.
  21. I don't know whether I'm amused or offended. "Well done", Mr. Suejak (and not a steak either, since that would be a travesty -- except, perhaps, if you served it with well water?)
  22. Maybe it'd be interesting to compare which Adventures we considered to be better than Broken Age. I'm surprised no one asked me that, already I just realised that's essentially my point -- I can't get behind 9.5/10s, because that means it can't get any better. E.g. from the last three years: 2013: Cognition. The story is great, the graphics and technical side not so much, but that's the thing I can do without the easiest. Took me 20+ hours to play through all four episodes, the highlight is the third. 2012: Memento Mori 2. It's a damn shame that game was released only in Germany because of problems with the publisher, to my knowledge. It's still the graphical benchmark in the genre, had a nice story and quite hard puzzles. It took my nearly 30 hours to get through it, and it was most satisfying feeling I'd felt in a while when the credits came. Plus, the soundtrack. Check out e.g. this. 2011: DSA: The Chains of Satinav. My personal favourite of the last 10 years. The story is everything I love: Sometimes funny, sometimes heartbreaking, often melancholic, always touching and the ending bitter-sweet. The puzzles were decent enough, the highlight was a long puzzle-chain in a wonderfully loopy fairy-realm. And if you go back even further, there's well-known stuff like the The Longest Journey games, and more unknown stuff like The Moment of Silence. So those is I'd rank above Broken Age (so far -- I realise we're talking about only half a game) on a purely subjective scale, some more, others less. The problem is digging up comparable ratings -- much of it is apparently too "Indy" for many sites. You can compare the DSA adventure though, and the funny thing is that it's like Broken Age, only backwards: 80s to 90s from German/European sites and magazines, whereas Destructoid and Adventure Gamers gave it 65 and 70, respectively (to be fair, RGP-Fan gave it a 90, though -- I could have written that one ). I can't, for the life of me, see how that score is possible (and I did play the English version). Maybe we really did start to think of something differing while saying "Adventure" on both sides of the Atlantic, over the years.
  23. Puzzles you would have done

    I was sure I would have to construct the dummy of Shay to fool Mum. In fact, I was looking for more items, and wanted to use the raft as a body. That it inflated to all of Shay was quite anti-climactic. That aside, there were also a lot of things I didn't want to do -- because I knew that's not how it was going to go -- but that I'd would have liked to see done. E.g. any item ever I got just by asking for it was, in essence, a wasted opportunity for a puzzle.
  24. Part of the reason is what you're comparing it to. Many of the American reviews are celebrating the "return of adventure games". Obviously, if you're going to start with that flawed a premise, you'll end up with a strange result, like some sort of "it's not dead!"-bonus. On the other hand, we have had Adventures over the years, and Broken Age is simply just another one. So it gets a "just another Adventure"-rating, which is the non-skewed way to look at it. BA is by no means 9.5/10 material. It's got too many flaws for that, and I'm flatly denying anyone who honestly argues different knows much about adventure games or has played them in recent years. The most honest way to describe it is "quite nice", which should translate into 7-8/10. It's enjoyable, but no masterpiece, not the return of Jesus, and not the best thing sliced bread.
  25. I hit the link in my mail, got a link to download an archive, unzipped the thing and now I'm playing. Now THIS is what I'm talking about Expect a lot of comments in about three hours