LemonLime

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About LemonLime

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Converted

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    Toronto, ON
  1. How about... inside a piano! Watch out for those hammers coming down (someone must be playing Chopin)!
  2. Worst puzzles - what to avoid

    Not sure if this has been mentioned, but one thing that really irks me is unconnected mazes! You know.. the ones where taking the wrong way will send you jumping around to disconnected screens, or just warping you to the beginning or something. For example, the jungle in Monkey Island 2. And that was pretty small. I know I know.. their two strengths are 1) making it less likely that you'll accidentally solve the maze, or do it through trial and error, and 2) saving memory (in the old days that is).
  3. If you watch the recent video update on the Wasteland 2 kickstarter, Brian Fargo puts it really well. They will incorporate input by the backers on the broader elements of the game, but they (as of course do Double Fine) have a team of experts in their field that will craft the game. A second "phase" of input will occur during the beta. This seems like a pretty good approach to me.
  4. Tim Schafer is not a god

    Imagine is not a Beatles song. It's a John Lennon song. But as to your post, I agree. Then again.. Mozart wasn't a god either, and I'm not sure anyone (except a total egomaniac) would feel comfortable being called a god. Mistakes and missteps are part of life -- it would be boring if they weren't.
  5. I looked around on the forums and I didn't run into any topics covering this, so here it is. Though I dearly love the old King's Quest and Space Quest games, one thing I really embraced in Full Throttle, Monkey Island, Grim Fandango.. was that the game wouldn't let you die. In GF it actually made perfect sense since you were already dead. But what do you guys think? Do you prefer one over the other, or is it very dependent on the type/style of adventure game? I personally found that it could get annoying in KQ, even though it did add an element of fear and trepidation at times. Remember carefully walking up and down staircases or around winding mountain paths that were maybe 3 pixels wide at points? I recall saving like every 5 seconds at some parts, and that's when the immersion kind of evaporates for me. Adventure games are more about the puzzle solving and the, well.. adventuring. That's my feeling anyway.
  6. Exclusive First In-Game Screenshot!

    Good one. Made me smile.
  7. I'm a bit short on time these days, but I'm actually slowly making my way through The Secret of Monkey Island: Special Edition. I never played the original (I know.. for shame). I'm loving it though! Then it'll be Diablo 3 on May 15 onwards until DFA comes out. Although I'm definitely considering downloading Psychonauts and playing that through again for old times sake. And maybe Beyond Good and Evil too (also downloadable on PSN). It's looking to be a good year for games!
  8. POLL: Who wants to get into the industry?

    I'm working on pursing audio programming right now. I have degrees in both computer science and music, so it seems like a good plan. Plus, audio programmers are hard to come by and there is a pretty strong demand for them. Also, it's awesome!
  9. Though I can't be sure what tools DoubleFine uses in integrating sound into their games, Wwise and FMOD are fairly standard in the industry in addition to proprietary tools, so that would definitely be a good place to start. One of the very cool things about Peter McConnell, who has done music for most of Tim's games, is that he was one of the original developers of iMuse for Lucasarts. iMuse was one of the early integration tools used to support adaptive music.
  10. The importance of game music

    Kudos for the importance of game music! It's really too early to tell what kind of music belongs in the game as we know nothing about it, but as has been stated several times in this thread, Peter McConnell would be awesome to have on board. His previous work with Time have all been awesome and contributed so much to Tim's unique style and humour! That having been said, my main wish for game music in general is that it is not left as an afterthought. Game music should be integrated alongside development so that it truly becomes part of the game, not just an output. I think this is a unique feature of video games, to have the audio adapt and respond as we play.
  11. Music composers

    Yeah, Peter McConnell and Tim Schafer have a pretty long and successful creative relationship. His scores to Day of the Tentacle, Full Throttle, Grim Fandango, Psychonauts, etc. really complement Tim's vision and style perfectly. But in the end it will be a matter of the project itself and what kind of sound would complement it the best. Of course, Tim did mention he could hum the soundtrack himself in one of the videos early on in the Kickstarter campaign! But that was before they got $3 million+!
  12. Why Did You Donate?

    I've been a fan of Tim Schafer and his games since Full Throttle. I got into playing adventure games many many years ago, back in the early days of King's Quest, so it's a genre I really love. I think it will be fascinating to see this project unfold, and given Tim and DF's track record, I am really excited!
  13. The Soundtrack

    It's impossible to comment on the game's music until we know what the theme and setting and the look of the game will be. Music is pretty much last when it comes to development. Though I absolutely agree with you on its importance. Music and sound are often not given near enough credit in video games for what it adds to the experience. That having been said however, I would love to see Tim continue his collaboration with Peter McConnell who he's worked with on all of his games since Day of the Tentacle. They make a really good team! Unless of course the project calls for something completely different, but the funds that have been raised would certainly allow for Peter Mc to step up to do the music if that's what's right for the game.
  14. Your first adventure game?

    My first adventure game was most likely King's Quest III. I know it was a King's Quest game, and from what I can remember I went back and played I and II after starting with III. Though Grim Fandango represents the pinnacle of adventure games for me, I still have a lot of love for the old King's Quest games.