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How did DFA the indie adventure turn into Broken Age?

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I was struck by a comment in the recent documentary episode that the game (and I paraphrase) "required triple-A attention without a triple-A budget".

If you look at the way the project has evolved, Tim has pushed himself, his team, and their finances to the limit to produce a no-compromises game of the kind perhaps he's wanted to make for years. He certainly didn't need to. They could've produced a perfectly good game with the Kickstarter funds available after the backer rewards had gone out. Instead they've funnelled millions of dollars of their own money into the thing to push the scope and production values as far as humanly possible. They are no doubt going to kill themselves to get the two Acts out on time and in good shape.

Why, exactly? This is a question that's been nagging at me for months. Why take such a risk when they didn't have to?

Part of it was undoubtedly over-ambition, stemming from the hype around the campaign and the desire to produce something that lived up to that, but as Broken Age has evolved and the documentary has revealed more and more, I get the distinct feeling that Tim (and by extension DF) has gone all-in with a commitment that suggests he thinks they may never get this chance again...or that this is a chance he *never* thought he'd get and therefore felt he had to grab with all available appendages.

In the end, the reasons are of purely academic interest to me because I love what DF is doing and can't wait to try the game. I think everything they've done is to the betterment of the project and the advantage of its backers, and for that I'm really grateful.

I want to say that if Tim did nothing else for the rest of his professional life except design adventure games using Kickstarter, I would back every one. There's no reason that BA should be a last hurrah for the DF adventure team. Why can't it be the start of a long and healthy legacy of crowd-funded adventures with Double Fine at the helm? One can only hope. :)

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I was struck by a comment in the recent documentary episode that the game (and I paraphrase) "required triple-A attention without a triple-A budget".

If you look at the way the project has evolved, Tim has pushed himself, his team, and their finances to the limit to produce a no-compromises game of the kind perhaps he's wanted to make for years. He certainly didn't need to. They could've produced a perfectly good game with the Kickstarter funds available after the backer rewards had gone out. Instead they've funnelled millions of dollars of their own money into the thing to push the scope and production values as far as humanly possible. They are no doubt going to kill themselves to get the two Acts out on time and in good shape.

Why, exactly? This is a question that's been nagging at me for months. Why take such a risk when they didn't have to?

Part of it was undoubtedly over-ambition, stemming from the hype around the campaign and the desire to produce something that lived up to that, but as Broken Age has evolved and the documentary has revealed more and more, I get the distinct feeling that Tim (and by extension DF) has gone all-in with a commitment that suggests he thinks they may never get this chance again...or that this is a chance he *never* thought he'd get and therefore felt he had to grab with all available appendages.

In the end, the reasons are of purely academic interest to me because I love what DF is doing and can't wait to try the game. I think everything they've done is to the betterment of the project and the advantage of its backers, and for that I'm really grateful.

I want to say that if Tim did nothing else for the rest of his professional life except design adventure games using Kickstarter, I would back every one. There's no reason that BA should be a last hurrah for the DF adventure team. Why can't it be the start of a long and healthy legacy of crowd-funded adventures with Double Fine at the helm? One can only hope. :)

Man, that's quite a tricky question to unpick. I have a few disparate thoughts on it so here they are:

First, the reason or one of the reasons they took the risk is because they could. In traditional publishing the only options are to persuade the publisher the return on the extra development will be worth the extra investment, or be forced to stop short of the ambition. In this case DF found several ways to self fund an extended schedule so the game could much more closely match ambition and there was nobody to stop them. They risked the ire of backers, but clearly most are along for the ride and respect the decisions.

Next, I don't think they're taking THAT much of a risk rather than investing in the future. The better the game is, the better the outlook for DF, and I think they must be fairly positive that they can finish the game. Let's face it the worst case scenario is that the Early Access doesn't get enough money, in which case if they don't already gave plans for how to deal with that the development might have to be put on hold until, say, the release of Hack n Slash, but I really doubt it would come to that. So really they're risking some short-term cynicism in order to make a long term great game.

Would we have been satisfied with a Broken Age that fit the 2 million budget? Hard to say, because we would have nothing to compare it to, but I think it's likely that it might have underwhelmed, or been an anticlimax because let's face it, it's a small budget.

So they probably would have 'got away' with the bare minimum game, but they judged that it would be better for everyone to do better than that. At least I think they did. We'll see, eh?

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Tim has not exactly been playing it safe. Starting a new company, deciding to focus on the creative side, restructuring the company to work on smaller projects -- these steps have all been off the beaten path. Also, I think they genuinely expect the game to sell well*, so it's probably tempting to put more eggs into that basket than usual.

* Not Call of Duty well, but Grim Fandango well.

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When I read the title of this topic, I had to think of something Tim said in one of the documentary episodes and that he realised during this project (when funds turned out to be inefficient for what he had in mind). That for him, adventuregames need to have a certain length to be able to tell a good story. I don't remember how much he elaborates on this, but I imagine it has something to do with giving the player enough time to sympathize with the characters and having enough time for the characters to go through some sort of inner development because of their experiences.

So basically I think 'needing' a certain length for this game - for a proper beginning, middle and end - was an important element that lead us to this point, apart from DFs opportunities due to the lack of a publisher and I guess their natural drive to do the best f***ing job they can ;)

Part of it was undoubtedly over-ambition, stemming from the hype around the campaign and the desire to produce something that lived up to that, but as Broken Age has evolved and the documentary has revealed more and more, I get the distinct feeling that Tim (and by extension DF) has gone all-in with a commitment that suggests he thinks they may never get this chance again...or that this is a chance he *never* thought he'd get and therefore felt he had to grab with all available appendages.

And I wonder about this... To me it certainly seems like BA is the first major adventure to come out after several years of silence, and I wonder if the DF-team feels the pressure to make sure its REALLY good... perhaps with Tim also longing to revive the genre?

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If you look around this forum many people kept asking "How long will the game be?", "Will the game be long?" ect. This was for some reason a very hot issue so I think they without a doubt made the right decision.

Full Throttle has always been accused of being to short which seems to more or less have been in Schafers mind in some way ever since (as I intepreted it based on the documentary).

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No doubt the production values of the art has something to do with the overall production of the game. They've spent a great deal amount of detail on certain aspects for all the characters, environments and lighting. The effect: It looks like an amazing Adventure game. Though, because of the ambitious art direction, and Double Fine's first foray into 2D, having spent more than a decade using 3D, the team at Double Fine found it impossible in order to complete the game with 2.2M. There was just too much art that needed production, and a brand-new engine and pipeline system that they needed to develop from scratch. Because the art direction is an idea that was started from very early on, I'd sum up that Tim and the DF Team visioned a AAA game from the very start, but didn't have the funds. However, due to pipeline issues, more money was required.

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Part of it was undoubtedly over-ambition, stemming from the hype around the campaign and the desire to produce something that lived up to that, but as Broken Age has evolved and the documentary has revealed more and more, I get the distinct feeling that Tim (and by extension DF) has gone all-in with a commitment that suggests he thinks they may never get this chance again...or that this is a chance he *never* thought he'd get and therefore felt he had to grab with all available appendages.

And I wonder about this... To me it certainly seems like BA is the first major adventure to come out after several years of silence, and I wonder if the DF-team feels the pressure to make sure its REALLY good... perhaps with Tim also longing to revive the genre?

It's that and the fact that this game being successful saleswise makes it much easier for Double Fine to make the games they want to make instead of relying on publishers to provide funding. They will get 100% of the profits which can be reinvested into funding new projects. Keep in mind you'll have Steam sales, probably console ports down the line, Humble Bundles, etc. The revenue will trickle in for many years.

Obviously they need to meet the backers' expectations too, or otherwise it'll be harder to crowdfund another game.

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Isn't every game a massive risk? My understanding was that Double Fine had been just barely hanging on for a number of game releases and Broken Age is in some ways a chance to break that cycle because it will be fully owned by DF.

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I get the distinct feeling that Tim (and by extension DF) has gone all-in with a commitment that suggests he thinks they may never get this chance again.

Why would you need a reason like that to go all in? Is there some other way to go?

:)

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Why would you need a reason like that to go all in? Is there some other way to go?

:)

#yolo #IveBeenListeningTooMuchToBrad

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I get the distinct feeling that Tim (and by extension DF) has gone all-in with a commitment that suggests he thinks they may never get this chance again.

Why would you need a reason like that to go all in? Is there some other way to go?

:)

I just hope you are holding a Royal Flush Tim.. and I'm not talking about your new diet...

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Ask any gambler what happens if you go all in every time. Sometimes you win big, sometimes you break even...but you only get to go broke once.

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Isn't every game a massive risk? My understanding was that Double Fine had been just barely hanging on for a number of game releases and Broken Age is in some ways a chance to break that cycle because it will be fully owned by DF.

This is my impression from the documentary as well. To me, every decision that has been made with regard to the DFA has been tempered with business logic. Before the Kickstarter funding Double Fine was apparently living hand to mouth and due to a canceled game was facing the possibility of layoffs. Given the company's trajectory at some point they had to make a big bet if they wanted to break the cycle mentioned above. So why not bet on an adventure game? Why not bet on the kind of game they know and love? That an adventure game plays to Double Fines core strengths combined the high profile nature of the launch of Broken Age makes it's hard to imagine that a better opportunity to break the aforementioned cycle is going to come along.

Their bet on Broken Age is understandable, but whether or not the bet is correct is something that only time will tell.

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I get the distinct feeling that Tim (and by extension DF) has gone all-in with a commitment that suggests he thinks they may never get this chance again.

Why would you need a reason like that to go all in? Is there some other way to go?

:)

:)

Not if you want to achieve something truly great...but I doubt you thought you'd achieve something truly great with the original six-figure KickStarter goal. Something pretty cool, maybe.

I guess I'm interested in the moment when "all-in" became the only way to go, and why that happened. I don't feel that has come across in the docs as yet.

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Isn't every game a massive risk? My understanding was that Double Fine had been just barely hanging on for a number of game releases and Broken Age is in some ways a chance to break that cycle because it will be fully owned by DF.

This is my impression from the documentary as well. To me, every decision that has been made with regard to the DFA has been tempered with business logic.

I think this is one of the things that has been missed by some of the media storms surrounding the game. Yeah, they designed a game too big for the budget - but they realised this pretty early on and have found no end of ways to explore extra funding, most of which weren't available to them at the time of the kickstarter. The Early Access thing is just the latest in a long line, and perhaps the riskiest because at that point the game is out there and so it needs to perform. But it still makes up a very small part of what they have done over the past year to keep the ship afloat.

So also it would astound me if Early Access is the only trick left up their sleeve. The money from Early Access will be important, I'm sure, but crucially as well as being a source of income to keep development going for Part 2, it probably doesn't have to get them ALL the way. By which I mean let's say Early Access buys them 2 months of development - but they actually need 4 months of development to finish. Well, that's still good, because that means they still have those 2 months to secure more funding from other sources.

They've pretty much bent over backwards to ensure they don't need to make big cuts to the game, which means they must really believe in it.

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Here's a tweet from JP LeBreton hinting at more stuff we don't know about:

"There's gonna be a lot of cool stuff coming out of Double Fine in the next two months. Ya'll don't know the half of it... yet!"

Increasingly it sounds to be that the success of Act 2 isn't contingent on Early Access fully funding half a year of development, but it's just to carry them up to the point where they have more things to release.

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Here's a tweet from JP LeBreton hinting at more stuff we don't know about:

"There's gonna be a lot of cool stuff coming out of Double Fine in the next two months. Ya'll don't know the half of it... yet!"

Increasingly it sounds to be that the success of Act 2 isn't contingent on Early Access fully funding half a year of development, but it's just to carry them up to the point where they have more things to release.

I've been thinking along similar lines. It seems that from a business perspective the DFA Kickstater was designed to free Double Fine from the vicious cycle of living day to day, release to release. It seems plausible that, even before any potential profits from Broken Age have been realized, the Kickstarter campaign by being as successful as it was could have already started to give Double Fine some much needed breathing room. It has certainly gained Double Fine a lot of attention and that attention seems to have lead to some outside investment*. At the very least successfully funding the DFA would certainly have improved the studio's credit rating potentially giving them access to bridge loans that they could use to stay afloat until other revenue streams come online.

It very well could be that the funding for Broken Age Part 2 has already been (at least partially) identified but the split happened anyway due to the lag involved in business decisions coupled with the unpredictability of future revenue at the time that they made the decision to make the split. Furthermore, once the split was announced there are doubtlessly several factors that would incentivize Double Fine to proceed as planned rather than going through the hardship of reversing course even if lack of funding was no longer the driving factor**.

It is interesting to speculate about where this new publisher free strategy will take Double Fine provided Broken Age sells well. The near term seems to indicate more projects of smaller scale (such as Spacebase and Hack N' Slash) along with some traditional publisher deals. The mid-term future is more interesting and very well may hold things like an independently funded Psychonauts 2.

* Dracogen, the Massive Chalice Kickstarter, and probably some publisher interest.

** For example, it will no doubt be useful for Double Fine to know the sales from Part 1 to gauge how much to spend on Part 2.

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When it comes to Art, you should be ready to consume the entire world to complete it if that's what's necessary-- that's not realistic of course but Art is already complete when it's thought of. It's the physical act of creating it that takes all the time and money.

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When it comes to Art, you should be ready to consume the entire world to complete it if that's what's necessary-- that's not realistic of course but Art is already complete when it's thought of. It's the physical act of creating it that takes all the time and money.
Hmm... well, the 'suffer for your art' idea needs to die because it's used too often to justify terrible working conditions for people working in creative professions. Not sure that's exactly what you meant by 'consume the entire world' but the point is that Art can be difficult - but we shouldn't romanticize how difficult it is.

Secondly I've very rarely made anything that arrived in my head fully formed. It's the physical act of creating it that takes the time and money, but it also changes it, often quite dramatically. Even music that sounds amazing in my head, so you'd think if I could just recreate the sounds in my head it'd work, I get it down and sometimes it just doesn't work any more. Or something that seems merely passable in my head turns out to suggest more wonderful possibilities as I go through the process of getting it down. It's very difficult to separate the inspirational process from the creative process.

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Why would you need a reason like that to go all in? Is there some other way to go?

:)

And that's what makes Double Fine twice as good as regular fine.

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* Not Call of Duty well, but Grim Fandango well.

So, uh, a catastrophic failure financially, not only causing the company to stop making games of that genre, but prompting the collapse of the genre as a whole?

;)

You forget that for big publishers selling even a few million copies is "disappointing" *cough*squeenix*cough*. For a company like Double Fine, selling 500k copies or so would be great.

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* Not Call of Duty well, but Grim Fandango well.

So, uh, a catastrophic failure financially, not only causing the company to stop making games of that genre, but prompting the collapse of the genre as a whole?

;)

Not sure where you got the "catastrophic failure" bit. Tim himself said in one of the docs that Grim "made its numbers". As for the rest well, yeah, if you're going to destroy a genre, destroy it with style. :)

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* Not Call of Duty well, but Grim Fandango well.

So, uh, a catastrophic failure financially, not only causing the company to stop making games of that genre, but prompting the collapse of the genre as a whole?

;)

Not sure where you got the "catastrophic failure" bit. Tim himself said in one of the docs that Grim "made its numbers". As for the rest well, yeah, if you're going to destroy a genre, destroy it with style. :)

I know he's just joking, but yeah - that and the decline of the genre probably had much more to do with the rise of storytelling in other genres - Half-Life (1998) being one of the first FPS games to do more slightly more explicit storytelling than 'There are some things, shoot them,' and stuff like System Shock 2 and Deus Ex influentual in how they brought RPG elements into a more accessible style of play for the mainstream, opening up the way for more ways to tell stories. That and the sharp increase in the quality of 3D graphics towards the end of the 90s and early 2000s created enough interesting and new stuff that included stories that in comparison the adventure genre was looking stagnant.

Some companies kept making them, particularly in Germany, but I honestly think that such a particular set of skills were involved in creating games of the kind LucasArts were making in the 90s that it's a rare feat to approach them - I'm regularly underwhelmed when I play another company's games by at least one aspect of the design or writing. Luckily I think Double Fine are exactly the right people to be making this sort of game, short of getting LucasArts circa 1992-1995 back together.

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One way I've heard it described (and as SurplusGamer points out it's not the only interpretation) - is that Grim Fandango was not a flop (and certainly not a catastrophic failure), but that it also wasn't a spectacular success. And that was the problem.

It was critically acclaimed and probably as close as you can get to "objectively great". It had a gripping story, well told, with compelling and likable\detestable characters brought to life with marvelous voice acting, an incredible original score, gorgeous art...the full package.

It was an achievement, and one of the greatest video games of all time.

But it didn't perform like that commercially. It sold "well enough".

And if a game that represented the pinnacle of the genre only sold well enough, perhaps other, more obviously lucrative genres were a more sound investment.

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It is not that much of a gamble and neither really a choice. Not only because Tim Schafer is Tim Schafer, but at least so because the situation is the situation.

This game is obviously going to be the most newsworthy game in the history of Kickstarter, mobile gaming and adventure gaming. It might well be among the 5 most talked about games of 2014.

This puts an amount of pressure on Double Fine that nobody had chosen or foreseen.

If the game is in terms of quality and production value not up there with the 4 other most talked about games of 2014, critics will see it as a failure.

But if it is sufficiently good, critics will see it as a, er, game changer and it will rake in huge amounts of money.

So there is not much of a choice but to make it the very very best they can possibly make.

The comforting part is that it is not just an incident that this is happening to Tim's studio. It happens to them because so many people think, or even know that Double Fine can deal with it. If you look at how Machinarium and The Room and the likes are received on iOS, I would say that not only Double Fine is ready for it, but the market too.

It will be a must try game for many people.

That's why I don't think it's too much of a gamble to do it this way. Looking at the attention they are getting, it would have been riskier if they had delivered something costing only a bit more than three million to produce.

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The money did not go to the Broken Age only.

The money also went to creating an amazing 2d adventure game engine and workflow.

Future DF adventure games will be equally cool with less effort and budget.

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It is not that much of a gamble and neither really a choice. Not only because Tim Schafer is Tim Schafer, but at least so because the situation is the situation.

This game is obviously going to be the most newsworthy game in the history of Kickstarter, mobile gaming and adventure gaming. It might well be among the 5 most talked about games of 2014.

This puts an amount of pressure on Double Fine that nobody had chosen or foreseen.

If the game is in terms of quality and production value not up there with the 4 other most talked about games of 2014, critics will see it as a failure.

But if it is sufficiently good, critics will see it as a, er, game changer and it will rake in huge amounts of money.

So there is not much of a choice but to make it the very very best they can possibly make.

The comforting part is that it is not just an incident that this is happening to Tim's studio. It happens to them because so many people think, or even know that Double Fine can deal with it. If you look at how Machinarium and The Room and the likes are received on iOS, I would say that not only Double Fine is ready for it, but the market too.

It will be a must try game for many people.

That's why I don't think it's too much of a gamble to do it this way. Looking at the attention they are getting, it would have been riskier if they had delivered something costing only a bit more than three million to produce.

My one hope is that they can release it at a tempting price. The trouble with the kickstarter having SO many backers is that's already a pretty sizeable chunk of the audience for this sort of game. Even in the heyday of adventures you were looking at 200-300k sales for a very successful game (though Full Throttle did better). Which I know is different because this game is already paid for, no publisher recoupment to worry about, but it still gives an idea of how these kinds of games sell.

Now, this game is a little different because it's 15+ years later, the audience for games has grown and there are newcomers as well as people with nostalgic feelings. So there are two main types of people they might be hoping to reel in with the release:

* Adventure game fans who just weren't comfortable with the kickstarter

* Non-adventure game fans who are drawn in by the way the game looks, the marketing, etc.

with 90k backers they've already picked up a very sizeable chunk of the bona fide adventure game fans, I'd say. Not all of them by any means, but a lot of them. So that means they need to price the game at a level that's going to appeal to the more speculative buyers if they're going to sell what they need.

It's difficult to estimate without really knowing the size of the game, but I think at more than $15 they might struggle to catch the interest of newcomers. Spacebase at a higher price made sense, because it was a different, more niche proposition, but this they're looking for a success - even though the game has been made 'for' us.

/thoughts

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It is not that much of a gamble and neither really a choice. Not only because Tim Schafer is Tim Schafer, but at least so because the situation is the situation.

This game is obviously going to be the most newsworthy game in the history of Kickstarter, mobile gaming and adventure gaming. It might well be among the 5 most talked about games of 2014.

This puts an amount of pressure on Double Fine that nobody had chosen or foreseen.

If the game is in terms of quality and production value not up there with the 4 other most talked about games of 2014, critics will see it as a failure.

But if it is sufficiently good, critics will see it as a, er, game changer and it will rake in huge amounts of money.

So there is not much of a choice but to make it the very very best they can possibly make.

The comforting part is that it is not just an incident that this is happening to Tim's studio. It happens to them because so many people think, or even know that Double Fine can deal with it. If you look at how Machinarium and The Room and the likes are received on iOS, I would say that not only Double Fine is ready for it, but the market too.

It will be a must try game for many people.

That's why I don't think it's too much of a gamble to do it this way. Looking at the attention they are getting, it would have been riskier if they had delivered something costing only a bit more than three million to produce.

My one hope is that they can release it at a tempting price. The trouble with the kickstarter having SO many backers is that's already a pretty sizeable chunk of the audience for this sort of game. Even in the heyday of adventures you were looking at 200-300k sales for a very successful game (though Full Throttle did better). Which I know is different because this game is already paid for, no publisher recoupment to worry about, but it still gives an idea of how these kinds of games sell.

Now, this game is a little different because it's 15+ years later, the audience for games has grown and there are newcomers as well as people with nostalgic feelings. So there are two main types of people they might be hoping to reel in with the release:

* Adventure game fans who just weren't comfortable with the kickstarter

* Non-adventure game fans who are drawn in by the way the game looks, the marketing, etc.

with 90k backers they've already picked up a very sizeable chunk of the bona fide adventure game fans, I'd say. Not all of them by any means, but a lot of them. So that means they need to price the game at a level that's going to appeal to the more speculative buyers if they're going to sell what they need.

It's difficult to estimate without really knowing the size of the game, but I think at more than $15 they might struggle to catch the interest of newcomers. Spacebase at a higher price made sense, because it was a different, more niche proposition, but this they're looking for a success - even though the game has been made 'for' us.

/thoughts

I respectfully disagree on several points.

1) You are forgetting that the Adventure genre has grown in the last couple years, thanks to Telltale Games and The Walking Dead, Game Of The Year.

2)Documentary enthusiasts and people who just thought a game developer avoiding traditional publishing is a neat, new idea also backed this project, and not just adventure game fans.

3) Games that tell a story, like Gone Home, are quite expensive. I see Double Fine requesting $30 tops for Early Access, but I personally think $20 for the final release.

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It is not that much of a gamble and neither really a choice. Not only because Tim Schafer is Tim Schafer, but at least so because the situation is the situation.

This game is obviously going to be the most newsworthy game in the history of Kickstarter, mobile gaming and adventure gaming. It might well be among the 5 most talked about games of 2014.

This puts an amount of pressure on Double Fine that nobody had chosen or foreseen.

If the game is in terms of quality and production value not up there with the 4 other most talked about games of 2014, critics will see it as a failure.

But if it is sufficiently good, critics will see it as a, er, game changer and it will rake in huge amounts of money.

So there is not much of a choice but to make it the very very best they can possibly make.

The comforting part is that it is not just an incident that this is happening to Tim's studio. It happens to them because so many people think, or even know that Double Fine can deal with it. If you look at how Machinarium and The Room and the likes are received on iOS, I would say that not only Double Fine is ready for it, but the market too.

It will be a must try game for many people.

That's why I don't think it's too much of a gamble to do it this way. Looking at the attention they are getting, it would have been riskier if they had delivered something costing only a bit more than three million to produce.

My one hope is that they can release it at a tempting price. The trouble with the kickstarter having SO many backers is that's already a pretty sizeable chunk of the audience for this sort of game. Even in the heyday of adventures you were looking at 200-300k sales for a very successful game (though Full Throttle did better). Which I know is different because this game is already paid for, no publisher recoupment to worry about, but it still gives an idea of how these kinds of games sell.

Now, this game is a little different because it's 15+ years later, the audience for games has grown and there are newcomers as well as people with nostalgic feelings. So there are two main types of people they might be hoping to reel in with the release:

* Adventure game fans who just weren't comfortable with the kickstarter

* Non-adventure game fans who are drawn in by the way the game looks, the marketing, etc.

with 90k backers they've already picked up a very sizeable chunk of the bona fide adventure game fans, I'd say. Not all of them by any means, but a lot of them. So that means they need to price the game at a level that's going to appeal to the more speculative buyers if they're going to sell what they need.

It's difficult to estimate without really knowing the size of the game, but I think at more than $15 they might struggle to catch the interest of newcomers. Spacebase at a higher price made sense, because it was a different, more niche proposition, but this they're looking for a success - even though the game has been made 'for' us.

/thoughts

I respectfully disagree on several points.

1) You are forgetting that the Adventure genre has grown in the last couple years, thanks to Telltale Games and The Walking Dead, Game Of The Year.

2)Documentary enthusiasts and people who just thought a game developer avoiding traditional publishing is a neat, new idea also backed this project, and not just adventure game fans.

3) Games that tell a story, like Gone Home, are quite expensive. I see Double Fine requesting $30 tops for Early Access, but I personally think $20 for the final release.

I'm not forgetting that the genre has grown, I just think Telltale is chasing a slightly different audience there.

As for 2 I think I was mainly adventure fans, but sure.

as for 3, we'll wait and see!

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My one hope is that they can release it at a tempting price. The trouble with the kickstarter having SO many backers is that's already a pretty sizeable chunk of the audience for this sort of game. Even in the heyday of adventures you were looking at 200-300k sales for a very successful game (though Full Throttle did better). Which I know is different because this game is already paid for, no publisher recoupment to worry about, but it still gives an idea of how these kinds of games sell.

Yes, exactly. I couldn't agree more with this concern. Still, I would think that the market for Broken Age will be as big as any modern market for adventure games will ever be, so they have that going for them.

It's difficult to estimate without really knowing the size of the game, but I think at more than $15 they might struggle to catch the interest of newcomers. Spacebase at a higher price made sense, because it was a different, more niche proposition, but this they're looking for a success - even though the game has been made 'for' us.

I may be persuaded to gift it to a personage or two at that price (assuming it's good, natch!).

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