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Greg Rice

Localization Bugs: Spanish

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There's an error in a dialogue between Shay and Marek.

Shay says "How long have you been living here?" but in spanish the subject was in plural "¿Cuánto tiempo habéis estado viviendo aquí?" instead of "¿Cuánto tiempo has estado viviendo aquí?".

Also, when you look at a Space Chart, the subtitles appear behind the chart, so it's not possible to read them.

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I didn't get a chance to post this before Greg locked the other general localization thread, so I'm going to post this into each of the FIGS threads...

A HUGE thank you to everyone who has reported localization bugs! If I haven't responded directly to something you've posted, don't worry, I'm keeping track of everything, and am working as fast as I can to fix the issues you've found. I'll do my best to post bug fixing progress too.

I'm glad you're enjoying the game so much and are willing to help us make it even better. :)

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I've seen "space urchin" translated as "rufián espacial", but the actual thing looked more like an urchin-animal than an urchin-rascal so, unless I missed a joke there, the correct translation would be "erizo espacial".

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Not really a mistake, but... When Vella is talking to Car'l in Meriloft, she says "Hey, could you make me a pair of cloud shoes?" wich is translated as "Hola, ¿podrías hacerme un par de zapanubes?". That "Hola" ("Greetings") sounds a little bit strange being in the middle of the conversation. Maybe "Oye" would be more accurate.

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Similar case when Gus tries to grab Vella. She says "Hey!", but it's translated as "¿Hola?" (literally "Hello?"). I'd translate it as something like "¡Eh!".

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When the ship is under attack, the text in the "ship under attack" monitor will be a bit different to what Shane says when reading it (both Spanish sentences being correct, in any case).

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When Vella tries to use the towel with Rocky she says "Do you see any frosting on my face?" or something like that. Vella then responds, "No, you look very neat" but in spanish it says "Te ves muy limpito" when it should say "Te ves muy limpita" since Rocky is a girl.

BTW, Castillian spanish can be very non intentionally funny for latin american people. For example, nobody uses the term Limpito nor Limpita, just Limpio or Limpia.

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BTW, Castillian spanish can be very non intentionally funny for latin american people.
I was about to say that the translation was almost perfect except for the few things we're posting here but, yeah, I'm from Spain and I guess Latin-Spanish speakers will think otherwise...

Before a "this or that expression" war starts between continents, and before the great localization work starts getting dumbed down to more generic expressions that can be spoken in both variations of the language, I'd advise to make separate "Castilian" and "Latin American" selections under the "Spanish" tag in the subtitles language screen.

nobody uses the term Limpito nor Limpita, just Limpio or Limpia.
Not like that's something that people in Spain use to say, but I guess it might be there to add a slight tone of irony or something (not sure what the context was for that one).

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Agree. I felt it was cause Vella is addressing a small child, so it´s way of making the term "Limpia" adequate to her age, or maybe more cute. At least that´s what I got since in Latin America, as a familiar form to make things sound more "likable", people tend to use diminutives a lot, like when they say "hijito" (sonny) instead of "hijo" (son), people feel it has more "heart and feeling" if you put the ITO or ITA at the end of every word.

Actually the fact that the game is in Castillian makes it feel "Classic" in a way, which is the goal of the game. Since back then, all games, specially graphic adventures, came translated from Spain. And even games like Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis (Talkie CD version) or Gabriel Knight II, that were never released specifically in Spanish, got tremendous fan translations from Spain later on that were spot on and very good.

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Actually the fact that the game is in Castillian makes it feel "Classic" in a way, which is the goal of the game. Since back then, all games, specially graphic adventures, came translated from Spain. And even games like Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis (Talkie CD version) or Gabriel Knight II, that were never released specifically in Spanish, got tremendous fan translations from Spain later on that were spot on and very good.

You know, I was going to say the exact same thing! This feels like an (extremely meta) wink to us old-timers who played point and click adventure games back in the day :'). However, I think I should mention that Castillan Spanish sounds awkward to the Latin American public in general since most media tends to have a "neutral Spanish" (usually Mexican Spanish) and a Castillan Spanish version nowadays. That is to say, if you're catering to the niche nostalgia market it's perfect, but if you want to engage new audiences... I don't know how someone from Latin America who might download Broken Age as an app on a whim would feel about this kind of translation, for example. They might go "ugh, Spanish from Spain," and it might be an instant turn-off for them, because that's kind of a thing.

Just my two cents, though! *I* love it. |D

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I don't know how someone from Latin America who might download Broken Age as an app on a whim would feel about this kind of translation, for example. They might go "ugh, Spanish from Spain," and it might be an instant turn-off for them, because that's kind of a thing.

Just my two cents, though! *I* love it. |D

I'm from latin america (Dominican Republic), and I agree to this. No offense to people from spain, but to me the castilian spanish is distracting, somewhat similar to what happens when US people read shakespearean english, it just doesn't sound natural to me since we don't speak like that, and takes me out of the experience. And it probably works both ways, I guess people from Spain probably feel the same way about how we talk, they might feel like we butcher the original language (which we do, I guess :P).

I personally played the game in english, as I'm sufficiently fluent (I hope) in the language to understand it's nuances, and prefer to have the original meaning, which sometimes can't be translated directly (as any manga/anime fan would probably agree). But If I did play in spanish, it would feel weird for me to read "¿Cuánto tiempo habéis estado viviendo aquí?" instead of "¿Cuánto tiempo han estado viviendo aquí?". In fact that's one of the main reasons I play games in english even if there's a spanish option.

TL, DR: I vote for having the option of both neutral and castilian spanish. It would make me want to play again just to see how it was translated.

EDIT: After re-reading my post and seeing how it might be misunderstood, I'd like to stress that I'm in no way attempting to bash Spain, its language or its people, at all. Just mentioning how I personally feel about spanish translations in general, which is a feeling maybe others might share, and for those people the language option would make the game experience better.

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I'm from latin america (Dominican Republic), and I agree to this. No offense to people from spain, but to me the castilian spanish is distracting, somewhat similar to what happens when US people read shakespearean english, it just doesn't sound natural to me since we don't speak like that, and takes me out of the experience. And it probably works both ways
It does. The general reaction to Halo 2's Neutral Spanish dub was not too kind, in Spain.

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Hey guys, remember... this is for localization bugs ;)

Vella ceremonial dress graphic reads "A tu disposicion"... and it should be "A tu disposición" (the last "o" with accent). And in the case of the green ceremonial dress, the graphic reads "¡Délicia!" ("¡Delish!") it should be without accent on the "e" = "¡Delicia!"...

In general the translation is quite good! I'm going to replay it just to see if I find something new... :)

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lnzo.png

On that particular dialog, the second option is translated as "Comprobación [...]", but that's quite a literal and out-of-place translation. That "check" Shay says would be more accurate to its context as "Afirmativo", or "Correcto".

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lnzo.png

On that particular dialog, the second option is translated as "Comprobación [...]", but that's quite a literal and out-of-place translation. That "check" Shay says would be more accurate to its context as "Afirmativo", or "Correcto".

Would vote for "Afirmativo" there, as it's more humorous in that context.

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lnzo.png

On that particular dialog, the second option is translated as "Comprobación [...]", but that's quite a literal and out-of-place translation. That "check" Shay says would be more accurate to its context as "Afirmativo", or "Correcto".

Would vote for "Afirmativo" there, as it's more humorous in that context.

Yep, I also think "Afirmativo" would be the more suitable (and humorous) translation.

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Soylent Dreams was translated as:

zTy0n3P.png?1

Soy[lent] no se refriere precisamente a la soja, es una referencia a la película Soylent Green (Cuando el destino nos alcance).

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Soylent Dreams was translated as:

zTy0n3P.png?1

Soy[lent] no se refriere precisamente a la soja, es una referencia a la película Soylent Green (Cuando el destino nos alcance).

Ya, pero ¿cómo demonios traducen eso? Por desgracia, localizar cosas así es prácticamente imposible para que se entiendan. Podrían dejarlo en inglés, pero entonces desentonaría porque el resto de cajas sí están en castellano.

I think "sojacrispis" is fine, since this has the graphics limitation of being part of a box.

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Las referencias a Soylent Green son muy recurrentes en la ciencia ficción moderna, Soylent se mantiene siempre igual en la traducción, de otra manera sería imposible captar la referencia. En Futurama hay un refresco que se llama Soylent Cola en el original, en la traducción española se mantiene igual. El Dreams se puede traducir por cualquier nombre típico de cereales que suene bien (Soylentcrispis valdría), pero Soylent ha de mantenerse tal cual en la traducción. Salvo que haya una gran conspiración mundial en torno a la soja y esta no sea realmente una planta (siempre lo he sospechado).

No sé si es apropiado usar el español aquí, pero hablar de errores de traducción del inglés al español en inglés me parecía un poco surrealista.

No recuerdo el momento exacto, pero tras hablar con "Madre", Shay dice una expresión que termina con "Brother". Se traduce literalmente por hermano, pero ahí tiene el significado de "tío", de "colega". Probablemente haya una traducción neutra mejor, pero desde luego el "hermano" no procede.

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Soylent Dreams was translated as:

zTy0n3P.png?1

Soy[lent] does not precisely refer to soy, it's a reference to the movie Soylent Green (Cuando el destino nos alcance).

Sure, but how the hell can they translate that?

"Soylent Crispis"? Anybody who got the joke in Futurama will get the joke here.
I don't remember the exact moment, but after speaking to "Mother", Shay says something that ends with "Brother". It's literaly translated as "hermano, but its meaning there is that of "tío", or "colega".

If the expression was "Oh, brother", one correct Castilian translation would be "Ay, madre" (it would be useful knowing the context and full expression, though).

There's probably a better neutral translation, but it's clear that "brother" is not it.
I think that adding parts in Neutral Spanish without making a separate translation for it would clash terribly with the current Spanish script...

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When talking to the tree, Vella insists on knowing what happened to the old shrub with the words "Say it!". This is translated as "¡Confiesa!", which is a more direct translation of "confess!", as in, something you would say in an interrogatory, for example. I believe it's a stronger word than intended in this case. I'd suggest using either:

"¡Cuenta!", or

"¡Dilo!"

2014-01-22_00001.jpg

2014-01-22_00001.jpg.1f26d85f6c20f0c1835

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Something I've just noticed in the options menu, when remapping the controls.

"Interaccionar" (default value for left click) is wrong. The correct term is "Interactuar".

EDIT: Also, I've never seen "Modo buzón" as a translation for "Letterbox mode". I'd change it to "Ajuste de pantalla", or else nobody will know what's it about.

EDIT 2: The option "Guardar manualmente" can be shortened to "Guardado manual".

EDIT 3: Also, I don't think subtitles for yawns and groans are needed for the not hearing impaired... Shouldn't there be a separate option for enabling them?

EDIT 4: In "It looks like a fountain, but it's... flat", the last part is translated as "pero está seca", which means "but it's dry". The correct expression would be "pero es... plana".

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-I'll leave you alone

-Just like mog Chothra did. I'm used to it.

That last "I'm used to it" is shown as "Estoy habituada", but a more correct translation would be "Estoy acostumbrada".

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The "bowls of enlightening" are translated as "antigravity bowls" ("los cuencos de la ingravidez").

In my oppinion, it would make more sense as "los cuencos de la ligereza" ("bowls of lightness").

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