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KuroShiro

Some Constructive (I hope) Criticism

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****SPOILERS*****

I was not in any way disaspointed, here are my experiences with the game though:

whole playthrough was 4 hours and I tried to look at EVERYTHING. Had no problem with the interface, verbs get akward but do provide for more useless dialog. "I'm not putting my mouth on that" (can you tell I was a full throttle fan?)

started with shay, the art style and cuteseyness of it made me squee

I felt kinda cheated when I blew through the missions without even trying them all once, I picked train then hugs then trains again and beat the puzzle. Seriously though, how many breakfast cereals are there? Jeez, i'll have to go back when I play it again in 8bit mode tonight and see how long I can go. I skipped the computer suprise room you're not allowed in and kitchen and didn't get back there till the end of the shay area.

Switched to vella and spent quite a bit more time in her house trying to get all dialog from everyone. Knife/cupcake took an appropriate amount of exploration to solve for me and gave me a good sense of the world.

the tension at the sacrifice was perfect figuring it out. Did I mention that I'm in love with the music yet?

back to shay I really was hesitant to help marek, and I won't know his motiviations till part two if ever, but I was really happy with that arc and the mystery that remains.

Laughed so hard at the transporter puzzle, but it was pretty quick to find the answer.

The space weaver was a fun puzzle, the abstract designs help obfuscate the puzzle.

The most exciting puzzle was the pyramid, though I thought there would be a line about sneaking past using the cloud shoes and didn't get one.

It's hard to make a critique about story things missing since there is the whole act II, but talking about pacing it was very good, if a bit too linear easy for my tastes. So many items are used and thrown away instead of funny useless dialog later, but hey, budget is budget.

The JOKES! So much fun, and had the only toilet humor jokes I ever liked, usually HATE them. That deserves recognition. The crochet hook joke came outta nowhere and I laughed so hard.

The animation felt kinda choppy over the whole as a style choice, but for some reason vella's mother stood out as beautiful and vivacious, seemed smoother or more subtle movements or something. Took me a while to realize why marek had no moving mouth.

Thank you all for such an entertaining, fun and exciting game to play. I'll be puzzling out what the open threads will mean for act 2 till the day it comes out. Happy to see my name in the credits and find out they are navigable with arrow keys. Can't wait to try a playthrough in 8 bit mode tonight.

*REALLY SPOILERY*** so cool to be economic in the use of the spaces, yet completely change how your will play through them. It was driving me nuts to getting to use everything like the trash or the vaccuming heagon (checkov's gun right?), and not being able to defeat the damn snake (or i'm just dumb). Act 2, please don't hurt yourselves, but I can't wait. Do it right like you always do.

Thank you thank you thank you!

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I think I've been spoiled by great adventure games in the last years.

Games like primordia, gemini rue, resonance, the cat lady, the sea will claim everything, some daedalic stuff...

I was expecting this game to blow everything out of the water, but it didn't. Even the writing was hit or miss.

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Mostly agree.

My biggest issue is definitely the lacking depth, not the length or easy puzzles. When you talk to a character and exhaust the dialog tree, you are DONE with them. As things change in the story, I expect to come back to the character and have things be different, or new options open up. As good as the writing and voice acting is, this makes them feel less like characters and more like signposts. The short sacrifice scene at the beginning of Vella is a good counterexample - there was more depth in that scene then all of Meriloft, with the changing scenario making your fellow tributes seem like real actual people. Which doesn't quite seem appropriate, considering how long they last!

I think a lot of effort was spent on the art style and really selling that. And it sells pretty well. But I would have gladly taken a little less polish on the surface to have more under the surface.

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For a PC adventure game, it was a bit too streamlined and void of sidetracks and confusions. Playing it was not quite as joyful and challenging as I would have loved it to be. The inventory for example remains relatively empty throughout the whole act. The puzzles seemed to play out in a single room and some important items just landed on your lap without effort. (Spoiler: like the cloud shoes. Those you can acquire without ever knowing what point of the game requires their use. I like it when you are made to fail or meet a challenge you can not pass, then need to work your way trough. Meaningful gameplay could have been created from having Vella learn about the shoes, have her find some 5 pairs of shoes the wrong size, then be forced to make them herself.) I love games where you are given a magnitude of options and coming up with the right one by brute force is "seemingly impossible".

BUT

If I were to find this in the app store and play it on my phone / tablet, the game would have (and will) absolutely rocked.

I think that that is where the real success will lie!

And if act 2 is really hardcore difficult and item laden, all will be forgiven!

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I have 95% of the same feeling of the person that open the topic.

I used as mouse a touchpad of my mac laptop, and I wished to have some better interface, instead than the one dumbed down for tablet of one single click.

Drag and drop it is painful respect of an hover effect going down to the menu, the menu automatically appearing and one click on the object would be enough instead of dragging.

I am playing as well Time, Gentleman please, and I love all the thing that you can do that don't make sense, like look, touch, and taste of the classic adventure game.

I missed those very much for the one single button do everything.

I missed as well push the number instead of going with the arrow exactly on the phrase of the conversation.

It is a lovely game, but it doesn't feel like a point a click more a story to read, it doesn't feel for hardcore point and click genre and I found Deponia more in style than this.

I really really miss Monkey Island, Day of the tentacle and even that crazy and difficult Maniac Mansion style. Sigh.

I still didn't finish the game, but I am very worried and concerned on the short length of the game that I feel that I have to try everything instead to relax and enjoy it, because I know that it is gonna end quickly. Maybe something with the classic sword monkey island fighting? it is repetitive, but it feels like an actual challenge and it is fun to try to discover the similarities of the phrases.

* spoiler *

* spoiler *

* spoiler *

I felt as well that the start of Verla didn't explain and ease into me in the shocking way of being a sacrificial person, it just gone from the party, to the immolation place. I felt that something was cut and left out.

* end spoiler *

* end spoiler *

* end spoiler *

I love the documentary and I am impressed with the art of the game. Voice acting it is good, but I didn't feel anything special when I was hearing the Jack Black character as I was expecting. I felt that it was just ok, when I was expecting something very great, or much longer and fun conversation, I felt that was just a simple talk.

I hope that this feedback will help you for act 2, good luck and good work!

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I think the puzzles were not super easy, there was just too few hotspots, items and stuff. So brute force was easy (the fish guts thing and the solution of the riddle were in my opinion difficult, but I could brute force it very quickly because of what I just said).

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I think I've been spoiled by great adventure games in the last years.

Games like primordia, gemini rue, resonance, the cat lady, the sea will claim everything, some daedalic stuff...

I was expecting this game to blow everything out of the water, but it didn't. Even the writing was hit or miss.

Primordia was terrible in my opinion. Too many memory/numbers/letters puzzles. I hate those.

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I also do agree with most of your comments, the controls don't bother me however and I am enjoying it. I'm currently 2 hours into the game.

I do feel that the worlds that the stories take place in is not fully realized. As have been said earlier there are not many things to do in the game, except the linear solution to it. For a person like me who loves adventure games but always use hints, and walkthroughs i think it's great since it's just on the correct level of difficulty. I haven't needed to use cheting yet;) But it would do some good to actually be stuck for atleast a short while.

What really takes me out from the experience, and this I have not seen mentioned before is how when zooming in on some scenes the background illustrations are also zoomed in and becomes grainy. This really destroys, for me, a great experience where the art had true potential. I also do feel that the worlds feel less alive, and more static and "picture on the wall" like instead of me walking around in the world. Machinarium has the same concept, but atleast the main characters blend in more in that world.

It's hard to put words on it, but perhaps you understand.

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What really takes me out from the experience, and this I have not seen mentioned before is how when zooming in on some scenes the background illustrations are also zoomed in and becomes grainy. This really destroys, for me, a great experience where the art had true potential. I also do feel that the worlds feel less alive, and more static and "picture on the wall" like instead of me walking around in the world. Machinarium has the same concept, but atleast the main characters blend in more in that world.

On mobile, this problem also goes away.

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KuroShiro, I'm totally with you and your very well written critic.

Just finished the game a second time today and I'm even more disappointed than I was after my first play-through and after reading some of the comments here, I lowered my expectations for Act 2 a lot!

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For a PC adventure game, it was a bit too streamlined and void of sidetracks and confusions. Playing it was not quite as joyful and challenging as I would have loved it to be. The inventory for example remains relatively empty throughout the whole act. The puzzles seemed to play out in a single room and some important items just landed on your lap without effort. (Spoiler: like the cloud shoes. Those you can acquire without ever knowing what point of the game requires their use. I like it when you are made to fail or meet a challenge you can not pass, then need to work your way trough. Meaningful gameplay could have been created from having Vella learn about the shoes, have her find some 5 pairs of shoes the wrong size, then be forced to make them herself.) I love games where you are given a magnitude of options and coming up with the right one by brute force is "seemingly impossible".

BUT

If I were to find this in the app store and play it on my phone / tablet, the game would have (and will) absolutely rocked.

I think that that is where the real success will lie!

And if act 2 is really hardcore difficult and item laden, all will be forgiven!

Yeah it does feel very linear and streamlined which is sad.

Tim shafer can always consult Wadjet eye games and then get a hold of those point n click developers if he needs some help :) They make and combine the best of old school and new school imo.

Still complex, hard puzzles, not streamlining or dumbing down to much.

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I've just beaten the game. My very brief impressions:

+

old-school adventure, a couple of nice puzzles, "don't-know-whatta-do" moments, unique art style, perfect rhythm, very good story, very good dialogues, other games refferences, some acid critic to nowadays gaming industry, well thought interface, correction of the characteristic "slowness" in adventure games

-

I'd say there are more dialogue than puzzle-solving, few puzzles, some puzzles are really obvious, generally an easy game

Basically, regarding it's just the first chapter of a whole new game, it leaves me with an "I WANT MORE" sensation. I imagine and hope that summer release will be not only longer, but difficult as well. And less focused on dialogue but in the puzzles. But, hey, I have to say that if Tim Schafer meets all expectations, Broken Age would be at the Olympus of gaming.

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I feel your pain KuroShiro. I really enjoyed the game; it looked and sounded great, it was funny, and it was fun, and I don't regret backing. But it was easy, and quick, and I think I know why.

Ultimately you can brute force any adventure game. Apart from the odd timed puzzle or maze, the solution to every single problem is to say the right thing to someone, look at the right thing to set off a trigger, or rub two or more objects together. So the problem isn't that the Broken Age part 1 puzzles are easy, it's that they aren't obfuscated. In what we think of as classic adventure games, the required interactable items made up a surprising small proportion of all the interactable items in the game. Not only did this make the world seem fuller and more alive (another problem Broken Age suffers from, in how streamlined it is) by hiding the linear path, it meant that you had many more possible solutions to consider. Take any seemingly bizarre monkey island or grim fandango puzzle, then remove all of the elements in the world not directly required for solving that puzzle, and I'm guessing most people who'd been stumped for days and nearly given up...would figure it out pretty quickly. It's my contention here that people don't get stuck because they can't figure out to use a monkey's tail as a wrench, but because they're too busy trying to get the toolkit just out of reach, or use the incorrectly sized wrench they already have. It's the double edged sword of classic adventure games, that what we like about them the most is what most infuriates us. Double Fine have avoided that problem by streamlining (there are no toolkits, no wrong wrenches, only monkeys with tails), but have lost the allure of classic adventure games in the process.

I have to point out though that the riddle to get into the Dead Eye God's Pyramid was exactly right, at least how it played out for me. It took me a while but I worked it out and felt great about that, but then I couldn't find the item in the world to show to the guards. This was frustrating and I got stuck, because its location had been obfuscated. When I thought about it a bit more though, I was able to reason out/check every room for where I might find the item, and then I got to feel clever for figuring that out too.

If I'd had the item in my inventory because I accidentally solved the puzzle earlier to pick it up, I wouldn't have gotten stuck, but I wouldn't have been able to figure it out, because like with the other puzzles I would need a monkey wrench and only have a monkey in my inventory. With less options the right one, even to a complex puzzle, becomes obvious.

Yes!!! This is all so true. It's the core of my feelings about this game.

And it just shouldn't be possible or *that* easy to collect all the necessary items in advance so that you don't even have to go back and look for them.

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Pretty much agree with the general vibe in this thread. This post will contain minor spoilers - you probably shouldn't be reading the feedback forum if you haven't finished the game anyway.

It felt like the adventure game was sold out to the tablet and casual gamer market with this. The art was gorgeous, the music even more so, the story was captivating, the voiceover work was excellent.

But the game was non-existent. I didn't even try to solve most of the puzzles. It seemed like most of the characters were just giving me stuff, I never had to work hard to achieve any goal. In fact, the only time I was stopped was because I forgot to grab an item (Curtis' art) and when I went back I was like oh, here's a puzzle. Nope, Curtis just gave it to me.

Every fear I had whenever I saw Tim discussing adventure games with other developers, or discussing a streamlined ("they're all a use button!") approach came true. I've never played an easier adventure game in my life. I completed the whole thing, complete with bugs that made me start over, and trying to interact with everything possible in the game, in under 3 hours. I took longer on one episode of Tales of Monkey Island.

The lack of a "Look At / Examine" type deal just cut out half of the exploration feeling that adventure games have. The click-and-drag approach was annoying as hell all the way through the game for me. Clunky. It's just so disappointing to me, because outside of the gameplay, everything else was spot on.

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The puzzles gave me little trouble, yeah. I got almost all items as I went along, so I never had to backtrack far to get any. The only puzzles that took me a while were the propulsion one, as I missed that the gun was a pickup, and the guy stuck in the tree, had to use a walkthrough to know to fall through the hole. I enjoyed the game! Look forward to Act II.

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I just finished the game and I completely agree with the first poster. I've also been playing adventure games for the last 20 years. From the way the game was talked about on Kickstarter, I really did thing it would be a 'classic adventure game' - ie challenging. It seemed to be aimed at people like me, who miss the mind-bending puzzles of well-crafted old-school adventure games. But it's more like the Telltale Games, with very simple puzzles and more of a focus on story. That's fine, and I loved the game, but I wish that they'd struck a better balance with it.

A few puzzles actually took me quite a while to finish because I wasn't expecting them to be so EASY - I kept looking for more complex solutions. It took me an embarrassingly long time to

*spoiler*

*spoiler*

*spoiler*

wake up the mountain, because I assumed the solution to the puzzle couldn't possibly be so straightforward!

*end spoiler*

*end spoiler*

*end spoiler*

But once I settled in to the groove I got the hang of it. The pleasure of the game is really in the artwork and world-building.

The other disappointment for me was the lack of flavour-text. As I do in all adventure games, I tried using every item on everything to see what hilarious responses the characters would come up with. I was disappointed to find I got the same standard response for almost every combination. Where there was flavour-text, it was inconsistent - for example:

*spoiler*

*spoiler*

*spoiler*

If you try to use the peach on some of the signposts in the cloud colony, Vella will say something like, "I really don't think those guys would appreciate me vandalising the place." But it only works on SOME of the signposts. Other signposts just have the standard response.

*end spoiler*

*end spoiler*

*end spoiler*

I really think flavour-text and having some more depth and interactivity to the world would have made up for the easy puzzle design. In Telltale's Sam and Max series, they make up for the simplicity by providing a huge amount of flavour-text, and part of the fun in those games is coming up with the most bizarre combinations of things you can think of to see what Sam and Max will say about it. It also has the benefit of being optional, so players who are bored by that kind of thing can skip it.

Anyway, I'm still really pleased with the game. I think it's an amazing achievement, and I'm wowed that we've all brought this in to existence. It was a joy to play, but as the first poster said, I think it's worth noting the drawbacks.

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I don't think that being too easy stops this game from being a classic adventure, and while I would love to have more "useless" interactions and other things thatr add depth to the world, I actually thing that it's better to have less content, but all great, rather than wasting time and money on making fillers (like in Larry HD, where you can click on many things, but because of that jokes are getting repetitive rather quickly).

Still, designing Broken Age with mobile devices in mind was NOT a nice thing to do. Screen resolutions of 16:9 are cutting the picture, while 4:3 are giving the full view (while it should be the other way around)? Not nice. Having to click on inventory every time, when you should be able to simply drag a mouse to the bottom of the screen to get it open? Not nice. Having to drag and drop items instead of picking them by clicking? Not nice.

I just hope that all this things with controls will be patched out - the interface we have now is quite close to normal and making it feel right and work comfortably on PC should be an easy fix.

Other than all this mobile-based design stupidity this game is awesome.

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I only got stuck on the ladder/shoes puzzle, and it was because I thought I had already tried combining those two items (I guess I tried it in another area and it didn't work there).

I think they are easy mostly because there aren't many places to explore. Everything is there and you get it almost by accident sometimes.

There are some good puzzles though. Not difficult, but entertaining and well done.

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Thank You for a well written rundown of what seem to be the main issues with Act 1 KuroShiro, which also seem to be echoing many peoples sentiments even here. Haven't touched the game myself (and probably won't until I get my hands on the DVD) but I'd read similar "testimonials" on the few other boards I frequent, and I've gotten pretty concerned both about the interface and difficulty.

I recall a discussion between Tim and Greg about the game length in one of the Documentary episodes, where Tim was worried about making it too short, and people feeling let down due to an abrupt ending, and with Greg on the exact opposite side - "there's no way it'll be too short". Seems like there is a possibility of Tim's concerns coming to life, not due to the amount of content per se, but the difficulty and gameplay not "carrying" the game enough.

(ergo, never listen to Greg! %-P )

I hope posts like Yours will be taken into consideration, ideally upping the ante with the puzzles in Act 2, and certainly rethinking the interface for non-mobiles.

(I'll probably enjoy it anyway, but we should never settle for anything but perfection! Especially when it comes to sausages!)

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Yeah it does feel very linear and streamlined which is sad.

Tim Schafer can always consult Wadjet eye games and then get a hold of those point n click developers if he needs some help :) They make and combine the best of old school and new school imo.

Still complex, hard puzzles, not streamlining or dumbing down to much.

I agree, those puzzles are a different league of difficulty, the integration with the narrative is usually top-notch, and yet they seem fair and logical. This would be such a better direction for the genre to go, and any of those games would look brilliant with the level of craftmanship Double Fine put into a game.

I dont think so. I love the blackwell games (must be what youre talking about) but played through them in a similar fashion as BA. ie not getting stuck and clicking through in around 4 hours. I think they have a fairly similar difficulty and length. and this is just part 1.

resonance & primordia (both not being primarily in-house) I remember as being a little harder but Im a little fuzzy on the details of it now.

That's... taking an eraser to the history book, I believe.

oh yeah? any examples? I cant think of any right now (Im sure there are a precious few though) mostly its about what you missed to pick up or something like that. not realizing you can get clay from the riverside to make a perfect imprint for a bracelet...not noticing the keys in the back of the door. could take hours to "solve"...I suppose. 95% at least is this kind of stuff.

DOTT did have some good lateral thinking style stuff though, and parallel complexity that actually works. great great game.

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I had the fruit ready when I met the guards and I went through my list in order, it was second. :P So, uh, didn't get stuck there.

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oh yeah? any examples? I cant think of any right now (Im sure there are a precious few though) mostly its about what you missed to pick up or something like that. not realizing you can get clay from the riverside to make a perfect imprint for a bracelet...not noticing the keys in the back of the door. could take hours to "solve"...I suppose. 95% at least is this kind of stuff.

DOTT did have some good lateral thinking style stuff though, and parallel complexity that actually works. great great game.

From the top of my head gabriel knight had some really good ones:

- The chess stuff in GK3

- The tomb code in the first.

- Le serpent rouge in GK3 was awesome (some people say it's the best puzzle of any AG).

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From the top of my head gabriel knight had some really good ones:

- The chess stuff in GK3

- The tomb code in the first.

- Le serpent rouge in GK3 was awesome (some people say it's the best puzzle of any AG).

oh yeah the tomb and drum code stuff was great. hmm...yeah maybe those two would actually make up 5-10% of that game or thereabouts. good call. not familiar with GK3 since its so hideously 3D but Ill take your word for it.

still, I hold that its mostly NOT that kind of puzzle (but its what everyone wants of course. people do want to solve puzzles) and youd consider yourself lucky if each game has _one_ of them at some point.

(that reminds me I should try that moebius game already.)

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I am assuming the next part will be more difficult since this was more of an intro. As someone who doesn't play many adventure games like this I got stuck on a few parts. I didn't know you could combine items and that led me to being stuck for a while.

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I didn't need to be told by Shay that maybe he should take a dive on one of these missions when I hadn't even completed two full circuits through them yet. I think it even started eliminating missions from the list until I was left with the one that would let me advance. I dunno, it's cool anyway. What we can hope for is that it's a hit and we can get more games like this. ~87k backers wasn't ever going to be enough to be okay with 0 sales beyond that. So personally, I'm cool with it all, if the ease of Act I makes people excited to play Act II or if it inspires them to suggest it to their friends then hey that's great. If it leads to DF or other game companies making more adventure games, that'd be super awesome. We're trying to prove that Adventure Games Are Not Dead, right? If it sells then we may get even more games with their own twists and takes on the genre. This touches on why adventure games are difficult to make. With a system based game, like say Planetary Annihilation, you can really determine if it's actually truly fun for people-- giving away an alpha doesn't spoil the game for people. However, with a purely story based game like Broken Age you don't want to give away the story so it's harder to know what your audience really wants, you just have to do your best and hope people love it. I can think of so many friends who will play easy-going games like puzzle games or The Sims but are totally turned off by twitch or excessive strategy requirements, in fact, I know more of those people than I know hardcore gamers. I definitely have a lot of people to recommend this to.

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I agree with the criticisms here. I love the story, but the interface wasn't great, and the easy puzzles made it hard to 'live' in any one area.

I'd love if they had a "mega-monkey!" Difficulty setting unlocked when part 2 comes out. That doesn't require a ton more assets, some items and dialogue, and having a puzzle be 3 steps instead of 1 step adds a lot of time to the game

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Yeah, the dialogue is the hard part. But I would love a hard mode.

I don't think it will need more dialogue, maybe some animations.

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I didn't need to be told by Shay that maybe he should take a dive on one of these missions when I hadn't even completed two full circuits through them yet. I think it even started eliminating missions from the list until I was left with the one that would let me advance. I dunno, it's cool anyway. What we can hope for is that it's a hit and we can get more games like this. ~87k backers wasn't ever going to be enough to be okay with 0 sales beyond that. So personally, I'm cool with it all, if the ease of Act I makes people excited to play Act II or if it inspires them to suggest it to their friends then hey that's great. If it leads to DF or other game companies making more adventure games, that'd be super awesome. We're trying to prove that Adventure Games Are Not Dead, right? If it sells then we may get even more games with their own twists and takes on the genre. This touches on why adventure games are difficult to make. With a system based game, like say Planetary Annihilation, you can really determine if it's actually truly fun for people-- giving away an alpha doesn't spoil the game for people. However, with a purely story based game like Broken Age you don't want to give away the story so it's harder to know what your audience really wants, you just have to do your best and hope people love it. I can think of so many friends who will play easy-going games like puzzle games or The Sims but are totally turned off by twitch or excessive strategy requirements, in fact, I know more of those people than I know hardcore gamers. I definitely have a lot of people to recommend this to.

I like the game. but I don't agree with this comment. You are talking like open the game to everyone and making a game less fun from the original standards for more people to appreciate it. A bit like the original Dragon Age of bioware, that felt dumb down to Dragon Age 2 a very flashy game, rushed down that didn't have the same intensity of the original for the mass and more console type of player to appreciate it.

it is never the end of the travel that count, but the way your reach at the end. Easy end, it feels like cheating to me.

The backers where already your buyers, and I guess that where all hardcore gamer. We bought ahead of time. Other buyers after the game shouldn't have such influence as the backers, but maybe I am wrong, you know better the business in gaming.

BA didn't feel like any other classic adventure game to me (example: MI, DOTT, GF), and it doesn't feel like something recent as Deponia, as well doesn't have the thrill of a TellTale game because the style of the game it is more Adventure and not "movie" style.

It is just simple and quick, like someone else said "click through story", good for kids, bad for all the old kids in here that backed the game that had another kind of experience with adventure game that was better. It didn't matter the quality of the voice, of the graphic or the music (which guys those are really top notch in BA), but even if the story it is right, I am sorry to say it feels that just miss the target.

If I would vote, I would give 7/10 to the game, when on the paper on the quality of the whole team involved it could have been a 9/10 if not a 10/10. I would have bought this game, only in sale normally.

The pleasure that I had in the documentary and the amazing soundtracks are the fact that I am not screaming in despair, because those where greater value than the game itself for me, and so at the end I feel satisfied with the purchase, but not with the game as "revival of the genre"

I have hope for act 2 because I know that double fine team listen and will try their best to make it interesting.

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Yeah, I really have to disagree with most of you here. I know I'm probably in the minority but what the hey.

I found classic adventure games frustrating with the obfuscating extra items that essentially just delayed you thinking through the puzzles by presenting tons of red herrings. (that isn't to say I didn't like them, but I never completed one when I was a kid- I got back into the genre later, after it was mostly "dead") I think one of the really strong things about Broken Age, is like The Longest Journey, every item has a purpose, and if you use it for something other than its final purpose, it stays around or can be re-acquired, and that it puts its focus on the story as much as on the puzzles. I never played an adventure game for the puzzles, I just put up with them as a necessary gameplay device. *shrug*

Likewise, the interface is not poor. It does have to make some compromises to the fact that it's going to be a mobile game as well, so there can't really be a unique second-button function. But it's not hard to understand, and it doesn't make us use unnecessary clicks. Yes, not having a verb wheel is probably about the game being accessible, but this game needs to be a commercial success to make it to part 2. It won't be a commercial success if it's not accessible, which includes people getting frustrated too easily at the beginning of the game, or people new to the genre having to battle the interface. If Double Fine ends up making more adventure games, more complicated interactions might actually be on the table- who knows?

Criticism about the game dialogue being a little sparse would be valid, if it weren't on a kickstarter budget and being voice-acted. I felt the visual style of the game made up for this, but YMMV. If the game had five times the budget and a $50 price tag it would absolutely be reasonable to expect multiple look dialogues for everything, but one way or another, I think we'd have to pay more to get that.

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