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Poll : So did the game meet you expectations?

So did the game meet you expectations?  

1,184 members have voted

  1. 1. So did the game meet you expectations?

    • Absolutely Yes
      401
    • Mostly Yes
      411
    • I feel that something was missing
      260
    • Mostly Not
      79
    • Absolutely Not
      33


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Don't get me wrong, I agree this first act is pitched a bit too easy but it barely affected my enjoyment. I count myself among the 'die-hard adventure game audience', and I know plenty of others who feel the same way - I really do think that it's a minority of people who were SO disappointed by the difficulty that it seriously compromised their enjoyment of the game.

The only reason I'm bringing it up is that I don't want people to get the impression that there's a general air of negativity around the game, because from what I've seen that actually isn't the case at ALL.

No, there's not many so disappointed that the easy puzzles completely ruined the game for them, I also don't think that there is a lot of negativity surrounding the game and I don't think DF thinks so either. It is important that we voice our concerns, however. I may have enjoyed the game even though the puzzles were easy, but I'm not just going to be ok if it continues that way. I would like to insure that DF knows that it is an issue that needs resolving, despite how we may have enjoyed it. It's not a non-issue. That said, I know they do realize this and have already stated even before the beta release that Act II would be harder. As long as they know exactly why we were slightly disappointed and how we'd be much happier and enjoy the game even more if the puzzles were harder, and act accordingly, I'm content to remain happy and enjoy Act II when it arrives. I have no worry of that.

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I enjoyed this game. I backed it mostly for the documentary which already exceeded my expectations and the game has been like icing on the cake... I could have eaten it without the icing even.

Still this game was fun. I just beat it, and sure it only took about 3 hours or so to beat, but there were points that I was completely stumped and had to walk away from the game and try more later. The ending really surprised me actually...

Overall, I'm happy and will recommend this game to friend (more so when Act 2 come out)

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When I saw they had made 10 times what they asked for I thought to myself, "Wow they can really load this this up with content!"

Seems all that money was blown on art (which to me was "Eh", I don't see anything great about it), graphics and animation and the content is severely lacking. We can't even look at objects!

I would have been 100% happy if the game looked like the Blackwell games or Gemini Rue - which IMO gave us a far better "classic point and click adventure game" experience - in fact that was what I was expecting!

I would have hoped all that extra money was put into making multiple solutions to problems, giving a lot of interaction with the world and perhaps even multiple paths or endings.

So no, the game certainly didn't meet my expectations.

However along with the documentary I did get my $15 worth.

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Just wanted to add my two cents to the by-now-overflowing pile:

Loved the game. I can see why some backers were disappointed - the backed an old-school adventure and got something more streamlined - but I loved every moment of it. I especially loved the characters, voice work, art style and writing. The music was absolutely great.

Also felt the puzzles were too easy, but I did get stuck a few times. I think I would have felt a little more satisfied if there were more items populating the world, so that the puzzle spaces felt denser. But on a moment-to-moment level, it was hard not to play through this without a big smile on my face.

I thought it was important to add my impressions, since the first posts I saw on this forum were "I want a refund", "I hope the documentary will explain some negative things" and "Extremely disappointed". I want to be clear: my reaction to the game was the exact opposite. I doubted whether the end result of this whole controversy would be worth it, but Tim Schafer and co really did a great job in my opinion.

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I voted "mostly yes" because of the puzzles that were just a bit too easy, as has already been said.

But I absolutely loved the art and story, just hoping for quite a steep increase in difficulty in part 2.

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I feel like the puzzles really did need some work.

I feel like if I "get" the puzzle immediately, I lose half of what I feel is "exploration" for me in an adventure game. Half of exploring a world is getting to understand the logic behind how the world functions and works, if that's not somehow novel or interesting, then I just feel like I'm being told "Okay, you're going to do this now".

And I dunno, that feels hollow to me.

Without that feeling of logical exploration, of figuring out how things work, I feel like Broken Age has the superficial exterior of a classic adventure game down perfectly, but it's missing the soul.

I voted that I feel like something is missing.

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I feel like if I "get" the puzzle immediately, I lose half of what I feel is "exploration" for me in an adventure game. Half of exploring a world is getting to understand the logic behind how the world functions and works, if that's not somehow novel or interesting, then I just feel like I'm being told "Okay, you're going to do this now".

And I dunno, that feels hollow to me.

Most gamers today wouldn't stand for anything more. They lack the patience to figure things out on their own. That's the difference between then and now. It's not that we just thought of them differently when we were kids, like some have said, there were actual meaningful differences here. It's all based on your outlook, what you're investing into an adventure game, and the reason why. Lately it seems to be "to experience a story while pretending that I'm solving everything because I don't have time to think", which is an extremely narrow-minded view of adventures.

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I voted "mostly yes", however I must say that the puzzles were definitely way too simple, even if this is just the first half of the game.

Same words here. I hope that the puzzles will be more complex in the next part.

But it still being a great game and i don't regret of being a backer.

Thank you, guys!

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Great game and certainly a classic for me. Puzzles were ok, not difficult but not very easy (for classic adventure gamers clearly quite easy...). Years ago when I was playing all the adventures I could put my hands on, I loved difficult puzzles, but over time I "softened up" a bit, plus I had less time to dedicate to gaming, so the puzzles in Broken Age hit my sweet spot with regards to difficulty (they also were logical and fitting too).

p.s. played the first deponia and half of the second: a mess of a game, extremely crowded and colourfull retina-killer screens, long and erratic, didn't like it. I don't know how the soul of Broken Age can be compared with the mediocrity of Deponia (of course, in my humble opinion).

p.s.2 I am not sure I would have liked "a classic adventure game" ... the wedjeteye games are very good at this and I didn't need more than that.. I am actually happy that I got something fresh and with a lot of heart instead. I am much more about story than about puzzles, so for me Broken Age act 1 was perfect.

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I feel like if I "get" the puzzle immediately, I lose half of what I feel is "exploration" for me in an adventure game. Half of exploring a world is getting to understand the logic behind how the world functions and works, if that's not somehow novel or interesting, then I just feel like I'm being told "Okay, you're going to do this now".

And I dunno, that feels hollow to me.

Most gamers today wouldn't stand for anything more. They lack the patience to figure things out on their own. That's the difference between then and now. It's not that we just thought of them differently when we were kids, like some have said, there were actual meaningful differences here. It's all based on your outlook, what you're investing into an adventure game, and the reason why. Lately it seems to be "to experience a story while pretending that I'm solving everything because I don't have time to think", which is an extremely narrow-minded view of adventures.

Wasn't that the point of the kickstarter - to make a game that didn't have to conform to modern gaming/publisher demands?!

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Yeah. The thing is, a percentage of the backers conform to some of those modern gaming/publisher standards.

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Looking at how my preferences in adventure gaming have evolved over the last 20 years, I would say that I fully embrace this change and the new "modern style" over the classical one. And yes, I've played every adventure I could put my hands on, starting with Maniac Mansion up to and including the new Broken Sword launched in December last year. I guess some people are more resistant to change, or their nostalgia is keeping them from accepting this important shift of paradigm with regards to gameplay. It was anyway impossible for anybody, not just Tim, to please everyone but I still feel sorry that some people expected something else from this game to the point where they consider all this (in my opinion excellent) effort in very negative terms.

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I accept that there are multiple forms of adventure games. I don't happen to believe that the old style of adventure is bad or inferior or that I must change my views to a "more beneficial" modern approach. I merely think about these games in a completely different way than you do, which allows me to enjoy the things that you do not, and dislike the things that you embrace. Which is fine. It's not about nostalgia.

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Just finished part 1 and IT WAS AWESOME!

Thank you for: No pixel hunting, no massive inventory, streamlined interface that should work well with touchscreens.

Haven't had any graphics/sound issues.

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I guess some people are more resistant to change, or their nostalgia is keeping them from accepting this important shift of paradigm with regards to gameplay.

The logic that makes you arrive at this point seems like a nasty double-standard.

People who like new things MUST be able to see what makes new things valuable and progressive, and don't just like new things because they are new.

But people who like older things, they MUST be blinded by nostalgia and an inability to enjoy newer things, and they can't have a valid enjoyment of a demonstrably different set of design goals.

You can say anybody who disagrees with you likes old things just because they're old, and have an inability to understand the new progressive, who are hobbled in their musty basements with their antiquated toys because they can't understand a better thing sitting right in front of them.

I can say anybody who disagrees with me only likes new things because "Oooh new shiny!" and an inability to understand the benefits of older design standards, why they became design standards, and what they(when applied well) really do bring to a game.

But I figure that pretending nobody is allowed to legitimately enjoy or not enjoy something based on its age is a weak mental tactic used to avoid the core question:

"What does the thing I like/dislike achieve/not achieve, and why?"

Because that might require actually thinking about the intrinsic qualities of a thing, rather than finding insults for those who disagree.

And that would just be awful.

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Possibly my english (non native) played tricks on me or I just did not put enough thinking into this before writing - for which I am sorry - , but in reply to you (Rather Dashing) and MusicallyInspired I did not want to imply that what I like is "good", and that those who prefer "the old way" and do not embrace this modern way are "bad". It's after all a matter of taste and completely subjective, and there is no right and wrong here. So it was not meant to be a negative statement towards those who do not like this new direction, but more like what I think would keep some people from accepting it.

As a fellow adventure gamer, I know what it would be like for me to be dissapointed after putting all my hopes in such a project, so I genuinly feel sorry for those who are dissapointed and who expected a more "classical" adventure.

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Thanks for the clarification. :) Nevertheless, I still feel it was necessary for Dashing and I to post because there are others who DO think that way.

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I liked the game a lot. There was a lot to love and only little to be disappointed by.

I can't really answer the question though, because I didn't have expectations. I wanted to be surprised. I literally just wanted to see what Double Fine could come up with under these circumstances. Therefore I would have been okay with it either way. I guess one might say I had realistic expectations, if any.

Even if the game would have totally tanked (and considering act 1 it doesn't look like it), I still would have gotten the documentary and all.

Now I'm just looking forward to the rest of the game.

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Puzzles were too easy. Everything else was great. However, puzzles are a huge part of the experience for me. Story and puzzles need to have the same attention given to them. You can't sacrifice one for the other.

I agree - clearly the style, design, artwork, music etc are exemplary, but that is totally lost as the rest of the game is so sorely lacking.

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I'm not sure how drunk I'm supposed to be to play the first act. If the answer is very then this review will hopefully be accurate.

I've watched all the 2PP videos and from what I was seeing I was starting to think the behind the scenes would be the most interesting part for me.

But I fired up Act 1 on Steam before bed tonight and I was pretty blown away by the art and animation, way more detailed that I was expecting and the voice acting drew me in right away. I couldn't put my finger on it but the somewhat dark/meloncholic tone to the early story really caught me. I admit I didn't finish Act1 but I really liked what I played so far.

I sure hope this game will be a success because from what I've played alone it really seems to have a lot of heart and an unexpected amount of polish.

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It's a tricky pool. To say that the production overall exceeded my expectations is an understatement. The game polishing redefined my expectations for independent productions.

... on the other hand, the puzzles are too light, definitely below what I was expecting.

I suppose it averages on "Absolutely yes".

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If I have any complaints, it lacked "edge". The tough bikers of Full Throttle, the classic noir of Grim Fandango, the metal of Brutal Legend, and the mental insanity of Psychonauts... All of these things really serve a slightly skewed worldview that adds a little hint of danger and irreverence to the whole affair. Partially because in each of them the character you play is a bit flawed, a bit shady, and wouldn't think twice about dealing from the bottom of the deck. Raw. BA was very warm and safe, many times I felt like I was playing a children's book. Vella and Shay are both just kind of... nice. Good kids, not the kind that would raise hell or lie their way into a summer camp. Which is fine, I enjoyed it, but didn't lend to much character depth.

Sacrificing young girls and grooming them for it is kind of disturbing. For example, in the Maiden's Feast, when the second maiden decides she doesn't want to die after all and breaks down crying, I definitely found that a little bit dark.

Also, living in The Truman Show is not without its moments either. Cheerfully jumping into a chasm or cutting off your oxygen supply and saying it was worth it seems to indicate some sort of a death wish.

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I enjoyed it, its a good game.

If I have any complaints, it lacked "edge". The tough bikers of Full Throttle, the classic noir of Grim Fandango, the metal of Brutal Legend, and the mental insanity of Psychonauts... All of these things really serve a slightly skewed worldview that adds a little hint of danger and irreverence to the whole affair. Partially because in each of them the character you play is a bit flawed, a bit shady, and wouldn't think twice about dealing from the bottom of the deck. Raw. BA was very warm and safe, many times I felt like I was playing a children's book. Vella and Shay are both just kind of... nice. Good kids, not the kind that would raise hell or lie their way into a summer camp. Which is fine, I enjoyed it, but didn't lend to much character depth.

Wow, we were playing different games, at least for Vella. She vandalizes the controls of a spaceship she was told not to mess with, she takes down a cloud in a cloud colony, she sprays two innocent girls with fish guts that gets them attacked by seagulls, pretends she helped them when they don't realize it, AND takes sap from a tree against it's will by showing it high octane nightmare fuel (for a tree) it until it pukes. And that doesn't even include this option, which is captured wonderfully in this video I did not make (but I did something similar in my run) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hgw2mgrERfc

And Shay didn't have much interactions with others in general, but condemning the yarn people to possible death via train crash...

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Sacrificing young girls and grooming them for it is kind of disturbing. For example, in the Maiden's Feast, when the second maiden decides she doesn't want to die after all and breaks down crying, I definitely found that a little bit dark.

Also, living in The Truman Show is not without it's moments either. Cheerfully jumping into a chasm or cutting off your oxygen supply and saying it was worth it seems to indicate some sort of a death wish.

Wow, our response to the same thing complimented each other quite nicely. :)

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Loved the game although puzzles were too easy, but then looks to be designed for the broader non adventure gaming casual market.

(its worked well for Tell Tale Games)

I think only been giving the hints if you asked for it (like in Broken Sword)

and more clickable items as often it was obvious what to do by only a couple of things were clickable on the screen.

I still cliked very Satisfied though as I do love this game and do feel Tim and the Red team totally delivered..even

if it was perhaps not brain stretching adventure game I was wishful for..but I totally get that for the budget this has

had that game would have been a comercial flop for Double Fine.

I Still would love if Tim considers after this, doing another tiny budget adventure title that uses only the staff recorded dialogue or no voice acting at all. This would allow full emphasis on the story, dialogue and puzzles and just have basic graphics. As I feel with this game the time consuming, stunningly beautiful art and fantastic recorded dialogue meant I suspect puzzles, number of objects and dialogues had to be cut out? After all when recording each response I can imagine it quickly becomes unfeasable to have the triple AAA cast as the responses go up exponentially with the number of objects, locations and clickable objects.

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I thought everything was great with the exception that the puzzles were too easy.

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Sacrificing young girls and grooming them for it is kind of disturbing. For example, in the Maiden's Feast, when the second maiden decides she doesn't want to die after all and breaks down crying, I definitely found that a little bit dark.

Also, living in The Truman Show is not without its moments either. Cheerfully jumping into a chasm or cutting off your oxygen supply and saying it was worth it seems to indicate some sort of a death wish.

Its true, its not all sunshine, lollipops, and rainbows, there are some darker moments. I definitely appreciated them, remember I did like the game. But even still, it was very G rated. Remember Snow White and Rapunzel had some downright gruesome moments, too, but they're still fairy tales. And much like those stories, I think the whispy setting and the whimsical and magical characters unintentionally drain out the darker pathos. Sure Vella and Shay were mischevious at times, but far from antagonists, each was doing their best to escape a raw deal.

I guess what I meant was its missing some type of sharper hook in the top level description. Like if a friend asked you for a one sentence on what the game's about: Full Throttle - Badass Biker in the Future, Grim Fandango - Detective Film Noir in the Mexican Land of the Dead, Brutal Legend - Roadie in the Land of Metal, Psychonauts - Invading Brains in a Summer Camp for the Mentally Unstable, Broken Age Act I - Fairy Tale Boy and Girl Escape Toy Spaceship and Cupcake Eating Monster. BA is definitely the least wild of the bunch, which is NOT a bad thing, change and evolution are good. It was a great game and great first act. But I, personally, I enjoy a bit more bite.

I feel that's coming in Act II. Both Shay and Vella have somewhat resolved their immediately distressing problems, and must now forge their own paths in an unknown situation. That'll draw out a lot more of the inner character of each, and I suspect there will be some darker twists on how that will happen. I really think that Act I was engineered to be excessively saccharine, so it'll make Act II even punchier when it tosses those worlds away. Most coming-of-age tales start with the childish, then introduce a very distressing situation to push them over into the world of adulthood. They never end where they start, and that's where Broken Age Act 2: The Kick in the Ass is coming.

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I voted "Absolutely yes!". The truth is that I didn't expect much with that kind of budget. I was very surprised by Act I. It looked beautiful, VAs are fantastic, humour is just right, a story is enjoyable, no absurd puzzles. I had the warm fuzzy feeling I always have when playing Double Fine games. I also appreciate that I can play as a bad-ass girl.

I can't wait for Act II.

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