Jump to content
Double Fine Action Forums
Sign in to follow this  
Dexter

Developing games for a “broader audience”

Recommended Posts

Like I said, there is something preventing me. I'm broke, and I refuse to illegally download them. The fact that some of them have never been ported to Mac also doesn't help. We didn't have a ton of money when I was a kid, either. It's not like I didn't want to play them. I backed this because I wanted to make up for that. I backed it also because I'm familiar with Tim's writing, and I know I like his stuff.

The comic book comment was a response to the kinds of fans who have read 50+ years of canon on a character, and get annoyed when a newbie comes in and might want something to make the story easier to get into without having to read as much. "Newbies' opinions don't matter. We don't want you here. You're not allowed to like this." It just makes me feel really unwelcome both with adventure game fans, or gamers in general, and comic book fans. That's why I put myself down earlier. I felt horrible, I still do. It's like I'm not permitted to be happy with the game.

I think the "broader audience" thing was to avoid what happened with Psychonauts and Brütal Legend, the "critically loved but didn't do well financially" problem.

"newbie's opinions" do matter - in general

..but newbies opinion on difficulty? nah, at least not very much

especially as we're talking of a game which was supposed to be made for those who are missing the old ones

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Like I said, there is something preventing me. I'm broke, and I refuse to illegally download them. The fact that some of them have never been ported to Mac also doesn't help.

ScummVM can help you play most of the classics, even on a Mac: http://scummvm.org/

And some games like Beneath a Still Sky are now freeware, and can be legally downloaded for free: http://www.gog.com/game/beneath_a_steel_sky

right!

..and beneath a steel sky is one of the greatest non-lucas-arts adventures from the 90s ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yeah, I think all this talk about broader audience is a complete red herring. I don't think Tim has ever expressed any feeling of pressure to cater for a broader audience - quite the opposite in fact.

Tim Schafer HAS talked about how desperate he is to SELL OUT before.

How we are supposed to trust the guy saying these things, and then saying things like "classic" and "old school" in a pitch video to gather money? It's clear he's trying to thread some needle between "massive sellout" and "for the fans," but none of us deserve that compromise.

I can't imagine a hard/easy mode making a comeback, since the costs and market forces (which shouldn't even apply to a Kickstarter project to begin with) against the creating all of that "missable" content are apparently crazy.

Oh, please - it was rather obviously a tongue in cheek comment about how overused the phrase 'sell out' is, and how it's obviously used in meaningless ways. I could deliver about 20 quotes from Tim Schafer specifically about how with this game it's been a different process to before because their main audience has already spend their money on it and so on.

Surely you've heard the man speak before. He spends half of every interview making self-deprecating digs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't want "newbies" to feel unwelcome. I'm not saying 'take a hike, new guy', I'm saying 'Hey! Welcome! Glad you could come! Now, this probably won't be what you're used to, but give it a good try. You might surprise yourself and discover what we've all loved about the genre for years. Welcome aboard! It's a tough genre, but we're all here to help you get started!' What it actually feels like is happening for us is that most of us old-schoolers are being kicked out of the club in favour of newer members and we were here first.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't want "newbies" to feel unwelcome. I'm not saying 'take a hike, new guy', I'm saying 'Hey! Welcome! Glad you could come! Now, this probably won't be what you're used to, but give it a good try. You might surprise yourself and discover what we've all loved about the genre for years. Welcome aboard! It's a tough genre, but we're all here to help you get started!' What it actually feels like is happening for us is that most of us old-schoolers are being kicked out of the club in favour of newer members and we were here first.

I think 'most of us' might be a little bit of an exaggeration since the best evidence we have suggests that there's a high level of satisfaction, even among old-schoolers. Yes, it's the old school fans that have the loudest complaints, but I would venture an educated guess that most of us don't feel like we're being 'kicked out' of anything.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, art- and culture-wise it is just sad that some quailties from back in the days like using your brain became worthless.

Instead there is only money and easy to solve puzzles. Well, isn't the market not even yet oversaturated with products for people who doesn't like to make any effort - at all - while solving puzzles?

What about games that teaches once more the people to use their brains? Not interesting for investors? Wait, we are the ones thad did invest?

So it are the game designers really, that doesn't want to do smart games any more? Aha aha … okay, well, so than i'm done here!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And i mean really, if you want to have a game that is successful, you have to give something to it, that is outstanding!

If you are doing the same stupid shit, everyone is doing … than why should they prefer your product against someone elses product who is doing also the same stupid shit.

And if you look at some Popstars who are a long time in the business. And earning damn much money. Than you would know: If you allready got fans, than you damn shure should keep them! The more longer they stay with you, the more they gonne keep liking your stuff, the more money they will spend and the more loyal they will be.

Letting down the fans of the genre will shurely not help - at all - reviving the genre. I mean, if you are loosing the old fans, what exactly makes you feel your product is so damn great that it would make new fans just by its own?

And games like portal or minecraft just have shown that sometimes a good idea and beeing different is, what is gonne make a good success.

And portal that damn good puzzles … well, sell damn good.

There are plenty adventure games out there. And many of them do not have interesting puzzles at all. Or, those who do have interesting puzzles don't have an interesting storyline or any kind of grafic-quality even slightly near broken age and double fine in general. (When i played Broken age it reminded me how really truly impressed i was by the graphics in the cave!).

The one game i do think of did match those two things was machinarium. Machinarium made even tim AWARE of the chance to revive the genre. Aaaaand he made a game that was more difficult to solve. Maybe even near Machinarium. Aaaaand than they simply cutted it down till even a 4 year old could have solved the game without any further help.

It's just a total waste of money, having done all this beautiful world and than just letting your fans down and having no gameplay at all that would be worth it to be mentioned as "a reason to buy that game".

What is it even for a strategy? Making everything absolutley awesome, so later people won't mind the poor gameplay? Cause that is what critics say: Nah, the gameplay, no, not really worth it. But hey! It is f'*#ing beautiful!

If you want to make money, than maybe you better go all the way and make critics say:

Oh wow, absolut genius writing, awesome drawn world, perfect animation. And even puzzles that will keep you awake all night and keep you trying in this wonderful ambiente!

No. Whatever. They allready got the gaphics. So just f'^# it, gameplay, whatever. Dah. What do you even need it for in a computer … what, what was it again? Ah right, in a computer game. Pah. This game is just to be watched. So we gonne help everyone as good as possible, not in any way to have to wait for the next great screen, or to have to have the feeling he won't get further just that very next second at once!

-.-' Woooow. What a strategy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"newbie's opinions" do matter - in general

..but newbies opinion on difficulty? nah, at least not very much

especially as we're talking of a game which was supposed to be made for those who are missing the old ones

Can you then please tell me how to not be a newbie anymore? It can't be a matter of having played many of these games for a long time, as I've been playing adventure games since 1995, and still identify more with medacris than you. Is it possible to learn to become better at solving adventure games? If so, I'd love to hear your suggestions, because adventure game are my favourite genre.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Learn patience. Resist that urge to look up hints. Try taking a step back and thinking about the problem in a different way, maybe the way you're going about it, though clever, is all wrong. You also don't need to solve the game in one sitting. It's alright to leave it alone for a day or two and return. Or a week. Also resist the urge to just try every object on every other object. Talk to as many characters as possible. Look at as many things as possible. Every game will plant at least one subtle hint, as to what you're supposed to do or how you're supposed to think, in the are somewhere. Believe that everything you need to know is in the game. Trust that. The answers are all there and you are capable of finding them. Trust yourself. That's really all there is to it. Oh, and don't give up. If you don't have the time or the patience, you'll never not be a "newbie".

I'm practicing what I preach as I've just started playing Deponia and the puzzles are proving fairly difficult for me. However, I haven't looked up any hints and I've solved every puzzle by myself so far. It's not the hardest game I've ever played, but it's surely much more difficult than Broken Age was. A couple times I was tempted to look up hints, but I ignored that urge and just stayed with the game. When I got stuck I left it for the night, the next day I came back to it afresh and solved more puzzles. Now I'm stuck again and ready for another break. THIS is what adventure games are all about! Not the greatest example of that perfect adventure from the 90s, but it certainly is far closer than Broken Age ever got.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And i would guaranty you, that if i told some people i know, someone made a game, just with the same awesome gameplay and puzzles like in monkey island or day of the tentakle. And i am handing them over my tablet (i never minded that part, i do love playing games on my tablet, but whatever …) and they try it, and they are like: Oh damn, that is JUST like monkey island back than. Oh damn is that cool! Where did you buy it?

I promise you, it would work as a hit. Especially as Broken Age allready would have had everything else it needed to be awesome. That Shay-world shurley would have convinced many guys i know.

But it simply didn't happen. (yet? I don't know … maybe even "yet" but they went quite far in the "easy puzzle" direction allready … the more i think about it, the more i am unshure about if there is even a way of making the game complicated enough again)

I mean, on the one hand i am cool with it, when this myth "Games for people we think are stupid sells best" is proven wrong with broken age.

But as i just recently read that "Sold Out" link, i would suggest: Maybe they should just stop trying to be liked by everyone and just doing their thing. So than maybe just because those things are awesome, they gonne make theyre money. Not because they tried to make even the last thing as if even the last one would be okay with it. That never was the story of how someone have made a success.

And one more, maybe even a little mean thing: Machinarium was bought also by those, who thought it was too hard later!

But the word was spread by those who said the gameplay was nice, and the puzzles was fun! So this way you gonne get extra money. The other side around you got people who don't like puzzles telling other people, that they love this puzzle game because the puzzles are so easy, even they did play that game through. Yhea. There you got a argument why to buy that game on your hand.

And just to quote even Tim's writing: I am tired of playing childs games!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Learn patience. Resist that urge to look up hints. Try taking a step back and thinking about the problem in a different way, maybe the way you're going about it, though clever, is all wrong. You also don't need to solve the game in one sitting. It's alright to leave it alone for a day or two and return. Or a week. Also resist the urge to just try every object on every other object. Talk to as many characters as possible. Look at as many things as possible. Every game will plant at least one subtle hint, as to what you're supposed to do or how you're supposed to think, in the are somewhere. Believe that everything you need to know is in the game. Trust that. The answers are all there and you are capable of finding them. Trust yourself. That's really all there is to it. Oh, and don't give up. If you don't have the time or the patience, you'll never not be a "newbie".

And one thing that worked for me best, allways: If you are stucked, just turn of the computer or just even end the game. (play another? ^^haha i do have the talent just to play to much games at once sometimes ^^)

Do something different. Than when you like to play on in the game, maybe you are just gonne walk around that same place that very same way again without a solution first. But as you have a new distance to it, and your brain could "sleep over" that problem anyway, or is used to that problem, you certainly will be more capeable to think: Hey, that way! I could try it that way! (whenever you think something like that, you should of course try it … do never think: No, certainly not that way … )

Its better to try whatever comes into your mind and fail than doubt any idea you have. Mostly those ideas that seems unlikely will bring you on.

And i have to say. In every game i did in the end once looked into someone elses walk through! ^^ haha Well yes. Back than, in 1998 or something, you didn't have the possibility to go into the internet and search the answer. So with monkey island 3 it was really taff!

But i wanted this game to go on! So i spend really long time in puerto pollo doing nothing, and getting unpatience. But than, when you than discover a new room you get excited. Like you never will when everythink at once works out.

Yes. But indeed i only did this with monkey island 3. Because no internet.

Even with monkey island 4, when i didn't knew yet, that the solution also was online, i even bought the solution book haha there was a really really bad written puzzle in it, many people later did complain about that one. Thou i liked that game never the less.

With the Cave i even looked into a youtube walk through twice ^^

Haha. You see. It is all no magic. We are all just boiling with water. (okay, it's a german prhase, so i just translated it … mhm, whatever ^^)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Learn patience. Resist that urge to look up hints. Try taking a step back and thinking about the problem in a different way, maybe the way you're going about it, though clever, is all wrong. You also don't need to solve the game in one sitting. It's alright to leave it alone for a day or two and return. Or a week. Also resist the urge to just try every object on every other object. Talk to as many characters as possible. Look at as many things as possible. Every game will plant at least one subtle hint, as to what you're supposed to do or how you're supposed to think, in the are somewhere. Believe that everything you need to know is in the game. Trust that. The answers are all there and you are capable of finding them. Trust yourself. That's really all there is to it. Oh, and don't give up. If you don't have the time or the patience, you'll never not be a "newbie".

Thanks for a serious answer!

Your mention of trust made me remember a game that was a horrible disappointment to me, but more importantly a game that made me lose trust in games: Discworld 2. I was stuck in that one for a long time. When I finally gave up and looked in a walkthrough, it turned out that the solution was to talk to a person that I'd never seen. Due to a bug in the game, that person simply wasn't there. Maybe my view would have been different without that experience. (I do of course intellectually realise that DW2 is an exception, and that most games aren't that awful.) It probably would be interesting to take one of the classics (I've only played the beginning of GK1, so that might be a good candidate, or maybe the Pandora Directive which also sits in my unplayed pile, and I should play that one before the new Tex comes out), and play it with a determination to go nowhere near a walkthrough. I think we all can agree that playing with a walkthrough lessens the experience quite a bit.

I'm curious, though: Were you ever crap at solving adventure games? Are you proof that it is possible to improve ones skills in this area, or are you just guessing? (Strangely enough, I ought to be not crap at it: I was quite good at maths in school, I enjoy programming, and I like solving logic puzzles and stuff.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Even with monkey island 4, when i didn't knew yet, that the solution also was online, i even bought the solution book haha there was a really really bad written puzzle in it, many people later did complain about that one. Thou i liked that game never the less.

Let me guess… the swimming jump? (That's my first place for turning to a walkthrough in that game. I don't like timed puzzles.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And one more: I expect from an adventure game to keep me busy for around a week AT LEAST.

And if i don't play it for 2 weeks till i go on, it is usual for me as well! ( i did this often with telltales devils playbox and tales of monkes island, good games by the way)

That is, because i am a slow gamer. Anyway.

So okay. When i played broken age in 4 h i was like: What? I was fast? How could it be?

But later i read some people played it in 2 h and i was like: Okay, the world is back to normal …

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Even with monkey island 4, when i didn't knew yet, that the solution also was online, i even bought the solution book haha there was a really really bad written puzzle in it, many people later did complain about that one. Thou i liked that game never the less.

Let me guess… the swimming jump? (That's my first place for turning to a walkthrough in that game. I don't like timed puzzles.)

Oh no, it was that part with the prosthesis shop. If i hadn't had the solution book, that would have been the end of the story for me, i guess.

I just didn't realize even the system behind it. I today allready have forgotten what was the problem or the puzzle aswell anyway. ;)

It wasn't something too logic as i remember it. Some of those "How should i have thought about that?" puzzles.

When there was the swimming jump i allread got the solution book. ^^ So you even solved easily one puzzle more than me. I don't know what you are complaining about? ;) I have to confess, as i had bought the solution book than anyway, i liked sneaking into it sometimes. ^^

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for a serious answer!

Your mention of trust made me remember a game that was a horrible disappointment to me, but more importantly a game that made me lose trust in games: Discworld 2. I was stuck in that one for a long time. When I finally gave up and looked in a walkthrough, it turned out that the solution was to talk to a person that I'd never seen. Due to a bug in the game, that person simply wasn't there. Maybe my view would have been different without that experience. (I do of course intellectually realise that DW2 is an exception, and that most games aren't that awful.) It probably would be interesting to take one of the classics (I've only played the beginning of GK1, so that might be a good candidate, or maybe the Pandora Directive which also sits in my unplayed pile, and I should play that one before the new Tex comes out), and play it with a determination to go nowhere near a walkthrough. I think we all can agree that playing with a walkthrough lessens the experience quite a bit.

Yeah, I can imagine it would be hard to trust again after being burned like that in such a way. But it really is for the best. Looking up a walkthrough, and sometimes even hints, indeed does lessen the experience. But hints are a little better (UHS style, that is).

I'm curious, though: Were you ever crap at solving adventure games? Are you proof that it is possible to improve ones skills in this area, or are you just guessing? (Strangely enough, I ought to be not crap at it: I was quite good at maths in school, I enjoy programming, and I like solving logic puzzles and stuff.)

I'll repost something I added to the post you quoted, it's now on the previous page and I don't think anybody got to read it so here it is:

I’m practicing what I preach as I’ve just started playing Deponia and the puzzles are proving fairly difficult for me. However, I haven’t looked up any hints and I’ve solved every puzzle by myself so far. It’s not the hardest game I’ve ever played, but it’s surely much more difficult than Broken Age was. A couple times I was tempted to look up hints, but I ignored that urge and just stayed with the game. When I got stuck I left it for the night, the next day I came back to it afresh and got past it, solving more puzzles. Now I’m stuck again and ready for another break. THIS is what adventure games are all about! Not the greatest example of that perfect adventure from the 90s, but it certainly is far closer than Broken Age has gotten so far.

Yes, I was terrible at puzzles when I was younger. Or rather, I didn't have the patience. A few of everyone's favourite classics (some by Sierra and LucasArts) were ruined for me because I was stupid and looked up walkthroughs for them. Later on I caught on and a few games were spared being ruined for me. But I'll never regret much anything more than that as long as I live, which is why I've since sworn off walthroughs and hints from then on to atone for my cardinal sin. It's why I believe, why I must believe, that it is worthwhile to solve these games without outside help (or too much inside help). And everyone else can too, if they can just find that patience. Luckily, I still have some classic adventures that I haven't played yet and those experiences are, to my joy, saved from being ruined. I still have Grim Fandango to play, which everyone has been saying was a masterpiece, along with Zak McKracken, Maniac Mansion, and The Last Crusade. I've played them, but not sat down to finish them. I'm happy that I still have that to look forward to without being ruined by my much younger self's need for a walkthrough.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My house was stacked with those magazines that carried the solutions... since I was too young to play on my own, I'd just read those again and again and act them out with my friends :P And that's how I never had a chance to solve a LucasArts puzzle on my own : (

Embarrassingly enough, the first game I beat without a walkthrough was MI4. I felt proud of myself, but it was still kind of a sour victory...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"newbie's opinions" do matter - in general

..but newbies opinion on difficulty? nah, at least not very much

especially as we're talking of a game which was supposed to be made for those who are missing the old ones

Can you then please tell me how to not be a newbie anymore? It can't be a matter of having played many of these games for a long time, as I've been playing adventure games since 1995, and still identify more with medacris than you. Is it possible to learn to become better at solving adventure games? If so, I'd love to hear your suggestions, because adventure game are my favourite genre.

This here. I'm sorry if I was an idiot or made a bad first impression on you all-- I hope nobody's upset. I don't want to be a newbie forever, I'd prefer to earn your respect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you then please tell me how to not be a newbie anymore? It can't be a matter of having played many of these games for a long time, as I've been playing adventure games since 1995, and still identify more with medacris than you. Is it possible to learn to become better at solving adventure games? If so, I'd love to hear your suggestions, because adventure game are my favourite genre.

is it possible? yes, absolutely, as i also couldn't finish my first adventure games without walkthrough..

but how? dunno, it just happened, so i have to guess - at that would be quite as MusicallyInspired already said:

-be patient (with yourself)..if the time you didn't solve a puzzle can't at least be counted in days, don't even think about looking it up

-trust in the game! (no, it's not a bug! that one was really hard vor me to overcome...mmmh maybe i'll take a quick look in the walkthrough, just to be sure...:P)

-try to think outside the box

-if you have to look something up, try to find out why you didn't come up with the solution yourself - what did you miss? don't just play along

extra: play together with a friend / girlfriend / brother / sister...not only creates that a little different kind of game experience, you also get a greater mix of ideas and therefore a higher chance of finding the solution + it may be some extra motivation to try to be the one who finds the solution first...i used to play some of the games together with my brother and it was real fun ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think using walkthroughs is bad, it's part of the genre. My best times with adventures was when I played the Bestseller Games version, which was a magazine that had the walkthrough in it and the game on CD. Just 2 weeks ago I played through the Hector series and after a crash I lost an item. When I realized it was gone I checked a walkthrough, then the official forum and then I started from the beginning. If I hadn't checked the walkthrough I would've tried for hours and then given up on the whole series, which turned out to be great after I restarted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't think using walkthroughs is bad, it's part of the genre. My best times with adventures was when I played the Bestsellewalk through, sion, which was a magazine that had the walk through in it and the game on CD. Just 2 weeks ago I played through the Hector series and after a crash I lost an item. When I realized it was gone I checked a walk through, then the official forum and then I started from the beginning. If I hadn't checked the walkthrough I would've tried for hours and then given up on the whole series, which turned out to be great after I restarted.

sssh...don't tell such a story! ;)

let's put it that way: it is very unlikely that you got stuck because of a bug - especially in high quality work like the la adventures with lots of play testing it may be a little more likely on a low budget game like hector (which is great btw) it may happen, but as a beginner you should make sure that its not your fault FIRST (at least in my opinion)

the problem is that it's to easy fall back to the bug theory over and over to get a look ("well it wasn't a bug last time, but maybe its one now")

if it is you might still find it out after wasting some playtime - i didn't say never lookup, i say'd give yourself some time first

i'm pushing that because in my early days possible bugs where the most common excuse i used on myself for "cheating" ;)

looking up solutions is a bad habit, you definitely have to get under control :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ok guys....you got me...if its not possible to release the second act in 2 levels, be it for time or money, let it be not more than slightly harder than originally planed - not as hard as we or at least some of us would like it to be..

it may be sad, but lets face it: otherwise the result would be a weirdo game letting beginners gain momentum throughout the first ours just to suddenly throw them at a wall at full speed ( and likely leaving the genre) whereas advanced gamers have the great opportunity to feel like shay for whopping 3 hours before things get interesting..

so, as sadly as it is, i think a real adequate second act would harm us all (as others said before, i know)

it still would be nice if they'd patch in a megamonkey mode a few months later in that case...otherwise i'm not sure if i'd bake another project of them

and btw it would be really awesome, if someone of the da stuff could tell as wether where're going to be difficulty mode, because than we could finally stop discussing the same things over and over again ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hesitate to tell other people what does and doesn't lessen the experience. The following is brought to mind:

photos.png

Confession: I played through almost the entirety of The Secret of Monkey Island with a walkthrough. I was about 9 at the time, probably, and it was the most amazing thing I ever played, but I wasn't really familiar with the language of adventure games so I didn't get a lot of it. Me playing that game is probably directly responsible for most of my current interests in game design, writing, music and so forth since it started a lifelong love for adventure games. So I'm sort of unsympathetic to the idea that I played it wrong.

Don't get me wrong, I rarely use hints nowadays and I like solving adventure puzzles, but The Secret of Monkey Island made no less of an impact on me because I had a book that told me what to do. It literally changed my life, and I wonder that if I hadn't had that walkthrough, my 9 year old self might have been discouraged from continuing to explore adventure games.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

as i said before i used walkthroughs myself in the early days. it wasn't my point to say you shouldn't ever use them. but if you want to get better (and rid of the need of the walkthroughs) you have to restrict the use....it was my response to the question of the "newbies" on how to get better, not me trying to make any- or even everybody stop using walkthrough because of my personal beliefs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mm, I think the best way to get better is just to play loads of adventure games, regardless or walkthrough use. Eventually the puzzle language becomes apparent, and I'm not convinced that happens more slowly with or without walkthroughs. At some point most people don't want to use walkthroughs any more - mainly because they don't feel they need to, or can get by with more subtle hints. But some people still like to use walkthroughs and that's okay too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wrote…

I think we all can agree that playing with a walkthrough lessens the experience quite a bit.

…and then I was proven wrong. This is turning out to be quite an educational thread for me. A lot to think about. To me, every time I open a walkthrough or otherwise obtain a hint (such as uhs-hints that someone mentioned, that I agree is often a less spoilery alternative) that's a failure. I feel bad about it, and as a consequence it lowers my enjoyment of the game. It's interesting to hear completely different points of view.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I wrote…
I think we all can agree that playing with a walkthrough lessens the experience quite a bit.

…and then I was proven wrong. This is turning out to be quite an educational thread for me. A lot to think about. To me, every time I open a walkthrough or otherwise obtain a hint (such as uhs-hints that someone mentioned, that I agree is often a less spoilery alternative) that's a failure. I feel bad about it, and as a consequence it lowers my enjoyment of the game. It's interesting to hear completely different points of view.

Ah i don't know, it is true. But when i feel the urge looking into a walkthrough, i alleady stopped likeing that puzzle. ^^

Its more like a "Okay, so just move on to the next one" ;) But whatever. In some way it helps enjoying that game never the less in some way. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...