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Mobius187

Costume Quest 2 (Personal) Review

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I finished Costume Quest 2 (CQ2) about ~2 weeks ago. I played the original Costume Quest (CQ1) last year, so it's still fresh in my memory. First off, I wanted to say I enjoyed playing CQ2.

The plot was entertaining and, on its own, satisfying. However, and I'm not even sure if this is possible, CQ2 did not recapture the sense of nostalgia that I had experienced while playing the original CQ. I believe that was due to the nature of the plot (which again, was great on its own merits). Where CQ1 dealt with trick-or-treating in places I would have visited myself back when I was a kid during Halloween, the locales in CQ2 were not as familiar. That, and the trick-or-treat mechanic (i.e. knocking on doors) had taken a back seat.

The new costumes all solid ideas, and I especially liked the super hero. The Cerberus-like hound was also entertaining by virtue of the idea (hot dog costume). I did not care so much for the support costumes, like the Pharaoh (and by mid-game, the Clown) primarily because the game was easier. Unlike CQ1 which had some very hard battles that forced mid-battle heals and resurrections, CQ2 was not that hard, so I found myself not reliant on costumes that dealt solely in support roles. I'm not saying I wanted harder battles, per say, but rather I wish no costume served solely in a support role. Rather, it would be great if every costume had a support power in addition to their main attack powers. Just a thought.

I liked the weak/strong element added to battles, as it did add more of a tactical element to choose your costumes (not much though) or your targets in a battle.

The replacement of the Battle Stamps with Creepy Treat cards was a great idea. The cool down also eliminated another concern I had with the old battle stamps, which was once you found the "perfect" combo you hardly ever changed the stamps you used in CQ1. In CQ2 the cool downs forced you to switch which cards you used, and thus allowed for interesting combos. Great work. In the end I only had 3 minor complaints.

The first complaint about the cards was that I, personally, preferred the original artwork style (CQ1 over CQ2). The CQ Creepy Treat card artwork had a "Garbage Pail Kids" style to it, which I found interesting because it reminded me of when I was a kid and collected GPK cards. Was the new artwork bad? No, it was nice. Just not as good (IMHO) as the original artwork. My second minor complaint was that the effects triggered by some Creepy Treat cards did not thematically match the candy represented on the cards. Obviously it's hard to match effects with candy... and I prefer mechanics over trying to arbitrarily base them on what candy is available. Still, there were a few cases where a more obvious candy could have been chosen. That being said, the awesomeness of the new card mechanic overshadows these minor issues. So overall, again, great job on this aspect of the game.

The last complaint is the way the cards were distributed. I mean, it's fine to have them sold and found in battles/chests... but I would have liked something more like the CCG package element. I remember when I played Xenosaga, they had a mini-game called... well... Xenocards. You used credits to buy packs of cards and in-game you opened them, to the sound of tearing foil packaging. It was, well, satisfying. Then you examined your cards and searched for new ones. As you accessed new areas of Xenosaga, new card packs were made available to refresh the Xenocard game. While the purpose of the Creepy Treat cards is different than that of the Xenocards, maybe the ideas could have overlapped more, buying packs of Creepy Treat cards in exchange for candy... and maybe instead of cool downs the cards could be destroyed on use. Even though I liked the cool down mechanic...

With regards to combat, I've read reviews and I tend to agree. The timing mechanics from the first game required more skill than the new

timed mouse click. Personally I found it harder to time the mouse-click to match the ring. To be honest though, each mechanic had its own pros and cons, so I'm fine with the new method as it eliminated key hunting (which had me look away from the monitor).

The puzzles/secrets and side quests were fine, although like the original CQ, on the thin side. Finding a specific Creepy Treat card, hide-n-seek, or figuring out how to reach a secret location are fine, but it would have been nice to have a few more challenges. The bobbing for apples/eyeballs from CQ1 is gone, and to be honest, I didn't miss it. Then again I stress out super-easy and I'm terrible at twitch/fast-action mini-games. :P

If I were asked what improvements I would make to CQ2 my suggestions would be:

1) Revisit Halloween nostalgia by allowing players to trick-or-treat in rural areas, as in CQ1

2) Increase the difficulty of battles... maybe include "mini-bosses" as random encounters for harder challenges (less grind for more risk)

3) In battles, switch from "click when the rings overlap" to "click when the marker is inside the target zone of the slide" (similar to CQ1)

4) More side quest ideas (i.e. challenges that required restrictions like no cards, specific costumes, or even requiring Candy Corn to be worn for a certain set of battles...)

5) Bring back favorite costumes from CQ1 (mine were: giant robot, vampire, ghost pirate)

6) While battle stamps are gone, the idea of an equippable "item" is still good. Maybe allow each character to equip one traditional Halloween costume prop that grants them a unique power (i.e. plastic fangs = HP drain attack). Maybe restrict certain props to certain costume types, based on their primary (ATK, DEF/SUP).

7) Point #1... so much. I really loved the sense of nostalgia in CQ1.

Just a thought. I wouldn't mind hearing what others thought about the game.

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I finished Costume Quest 2 (CQ2) about ~2 weeks ago. I played the original Costume Quest (CQ1) last year, so it's still fresh in my memory. First off, I wanted to say I enjoyed playing CQ2.

The plot was entertaining and, on its own, satisfying. However, and I'm not even sure if this is possible, CQ2 did not recapture the sense of nostalgia that I had experienced while playing the original CQ. I believe that was due to the nature of the plot (which again, was great on its own merits). Where CQ1 dealt with trick-or-treating in places I would have visited myself back when I was a kid during Halloween, the locales in CQ2 were not as familiar. That, and the trick-or-treat mechanic (i.e. knocking on doors) had taken a back seat.

The new costumes all solid ideas, and I especially liked the super hero. The Cerberus-like hound was also entertaining by virtue of the idea (hot dog costume). I did not care so much for the support costumes, like the Pharaoh (and by mid-game, the Clown) primarily because the game was easier. Unlike CQ1 which had some very hard battles that forced mid-battle heals and resurrections, CQ2 was not that hard, so I found myself not reliant on costumes that dealt solely in support roles. I'm not saying I wanted harder battles, per say, but rather I wish no costume served solely in a support role. Rather, it would be great if every costume had a support power in addition to their main attack powers. Just a thought.

I liked the weak/strong element added to battles, as it did add more of a tactical element to choose your costumes (not much though) or your targets in a battle.

The replacement of the Battle Stamps with Creepy Treat cards was a great idea. The cool down also eliminated another concern I had with the old battle stamps, which was once you found the "perfect" combo you hardly ever changed the stamps you used in CQ1. In CQ2 the cool downs forced you to switch which cards you used, and thus allowed for interesting combos. Great work. In the end I only had 3 minor complaints.

The first complaint about the cards was that I, personally, preferred the original artwork style (CQ1 over CQ2). The CQ Creepy Treat card artwork had a "Garbage Pail Kids" style to it, which I found interesting because it reminded me of when I was a kid and collected GPK cards. Was the new artwork bad? No, it was nice. Just not as good (IMHO) as the original artwork. My second minor complaint was that the effects triggered by some Creepy Treat cards did not thematically match the candy represented on the cards. Obviously it's hard to match effects with candy... and I prefer mechanics over trying to arbitrarily base them on what candy is available. Still, there were a few cases where a more obvious candy could have been chosen. That being said, the awesomeness of the new card mechanic overshadows these minor issues. So overall, again, great job on this aspect of the game.

The last complaint is the way the cards were distributed. I mean, it's fine to have them sold and found in battles/chests... but I would have liked something more like the CCG package element. I remember when I played Xenosaga, they had a mini-game called... well... Xenocards. You used credits to buy packs of cards and in-game you opened them, to the sound of tearing foil packaging. It was, well, satisfying. Then you examined your cards and searched for new ones. As you accessed new areas of Xenosaga, new card packs were made available to refresh the Xenocard game. While the purpose of the Creepy Treat cards is different than that of the Xenocards, maybe the ideas could have overlapped more, buying packs of Creepy Treat cards in exchange for candy... and maybe instead of cool downs the cards could be destroyed on use. Even though I liked the cool down mechanic...

With regards to combat, I've read reviews and I tend to agree. The timing mechanics from the first game required more skill than the new

timed mouse click. Personally I found it harder to time the mouse-click to match the ring. To be honest though, each mechanic had its own pros and cons, so I'm fine with the new method as it eliminated key hunting (which had me look away from the monitor).

The puzzles/secrets and side quests were fine, although like the original CQ, on the thin side. Finding a specific Creepy Treat card, hide-n-seek, or figuring out how to reach a secret location are fine, but it would have been nice to have a few more challenges. The bobbing for apples/eyeballs from CQ1 is gone, and to be honest, I didn't miss it. Then again I stress out super-easy and I'm terrible at twitch/fast-action mini-games. :P

If I were asked what improvements I would make to CQ2 my suggestions would be:

1) Revisit Halloween nostalgia by allowing players to trick-or-treat in rural areas, as in CQ1

2) Increase the difficulty of battles... maybe include "mini-bosses" as random encounters for harder challenges (less grind for more risk)

3) In battles, switch from "click when the rings overlap" to "click when the marker is inside the target zone of the slide" (similar to CQ1)

4) More side quest ideas (i.e. challenges that required restrictions like no cards, specific costumes, or even requiring Candy Corn to be worn for a certain set of battles...)

5) Bring back favorite costumes from CQ1 (mine were: giant robot, vampire, ghost pirate)

6) While battle stamps are gone, the idea of an equippable "item" is still good. Maybe allow each character to equip one traditional Halloween costume prop that grants them a unique power (i.e. plastic fangs = HP drain attack). Maybe restrict certain props to certain costume types, based on their primary (ATK, DEF/SUP).

7) Point #1... so much. I really loved the sense of nostalgia in CQ1.

Just a thought. I wouldn't mind hearing what others thought about the game.

Nice thoughts.

While I haven't finished the game and I don't have the full perspective I would say there are a couple of things that feel different or off:

1. When you attack and get the timing right it shows 'green' to indicate that you earned more damage. Then when you counter an attack correctly and take less damage it's 'red.' To me, each correct timing action should be green. When I see the red during the counter attacks it makes me think I messed up.

2. An easier way to switch the cards. If there's going to be cool downs, that means I will be mixing up using the cards more. Maybe a button push that brings up a wheel where you can quickly select a card (like you do when changing costumes). Flipping through the Y menu is a tad cumbersome.

3. I like that you can use candy to heal, but I am not a fan of the fountains. I feel like it's needlessly extending the length of the game.

That said, I am very happy so far. My kids and I are having a blast reading the candy corn sayings. Where's a candy corn plushie, DF? :)

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I finished Costume Quest 2 (CQ2) about ~2 weeks ago. I played the original Costume Quest (CQ1) last year, so it's still fresh in my memory. First off, I wanted to say I enjoyed playing CQ2.

The plot was entertaining and, on its own, satisfying. However, and I'm not even sure if this is possible, CQ2 did not recapture the sense of nostalgia that I had experienced while playing the original CQ. I believe that was due to the nature of the plot (which again, was great on its own merits). Where CQ1 dealt with trick-or-treating in places I would have visited myself back when I was a kid during Halloween, the locales in CQ2 were not as familiar. That, and the trick-or-treat mechanic (i.e. knocking on doors) had taken a back seat.

The new costumes all solid ideas, and I especially liked the super hero. The Cerberus-like hound was also entertaining by virtue of the idea (hot dog costume). I did not care so much for the support costumes, like the Pharaoh (and by mid-game, the Clown) primarily because the game was easier. Unlike CQ1 which had some very hard battles that forced mid-battle heals and resurrections, CQ2 was not that hard, so I found myself not reliant on costumes that dealt solely in support roles. I'm not saying I wanted harder battles, per say, but rather I wish no costume served solely in a support role. Rather, it would be great if every costume had a support power in addition to their main attack powers. Just a thought.

I liked the weak/strong element added to battles, as it did add more of a tactical element to choose your costumes (not much though) or your targets in a battle.

The replacement of the Battle Stamps with Creepy Treat cards was a great idea. The cool down also eliminated another concern I had with the old battle stamps, which was once you found the "perfect" combo you hardly ever changed the stamps you used in CQ1. In CQ2 the cool downs forced you to switch which cards you used, and thus allowed for interesting combos. Great work. In the end I only had 3 minor complaints.

The first complaint about the cards was that I, personally, preferred the original artwork style (CQ1 over CQ2). The CQ Creepy Treat card artwork had a "Garbage Pail Kids" style to it, which I found interesting because it reminded me of when I was a kid and collected GPK cards. Was the new artwork bad? No, it was nice. Just not as good (IMHO) as the original artwork. My second minor complaint was that the effects triggered by some Creepy Treat cards did not thematically match the candy represented on the cards. Obviously it's hard to match effects with candy... and I prefer mechanics over trying to arbitrarily base them on what candy is available. Still, there were a few cases where a more obvious candy could have been chosen. That being said, the awesomeness of the new card mechanic overshadows these minor issues. So overall, again, great job on this aspect of the game.

The last complaint is the way the cards were distributed. I mean, it's fine to have them sold and found in battles/chests... but I would have liked something more like the CCG package element. I remember when I played Xenosaga, they had a mini-game called... well... Xenocards. You used credits to buy packs of cards and in-game you opened them, to the sound of tearing foil packaging. It was, well, satisfying. Then you examined your cards and searched for new ones. As you accessed new areas of Xenosaga, new card packs were made available to refresh the Xenocard game. While the purpose of the Creepy Treat cards is different than that of the Xenocards, maybe the ideas could have overlapped more, buying packs of Creepy Treat cards in exchange for candy... and maybe instead of cool downs the cards could be destroyed on use. Even though I liked the cool down mechanic...

With regards to combat, I've read reviews and I tend to agree. The timing mechanics from the first game required more skill than the new

timed mouse click. Personally I found it harder to time the mouse-click to match the ring. To be honest though, each mechanic had its own pros and cons, so I'm fine with the new method as it eliminated key hunting (which had me look away from the monitor).

The puzzles/secrets and side quests were fine, although like the original CQ, on the thin side. Finding a specific Creepy Treat card, hide-n-seek, or figuring out how to reach a secret location are fine, but it would have been nice to have a few more challenges. The bobbing for apples/eyeballs from CQ1 is gone, and to be honest, I didn't miss it. Then again I stress out super-easy and I'm terrible at twitch/fast-action mini-games. :P

If I were asked what improvements I would make to CQ2 my suggestions would be:

1) Revisit Halloween nostalgia by allowing players to trick-or-treat in rural areas, as in CQ1

2) Increase the difficulty of battles... maybe include "mini-bosses" as random encounters for harder challenges (less grind for more risk)

3) In battles, switch from "click when the rings overlap" to "click when the marker is inside the target zone of the slide" (similar to CQ1)

4) More side quest ideas (i.e. challenges that required restrictions like no cards, specific costumes, or even requiring Candy Corn to be worn for a certain set of battles...)

5) Bring back favorite costumes from CQ1 (mine were: giant robot, vampire, ghost pirate)

6) While battle stamps are gone, the idea of an equippable "item" is still good. Maybe allow each character to equip one traditional Halloween costume prop that grants them a unique power (i.e. plastic fangs = HP drain attack). Maybe restrict certain props to certain costume types, based on their primary (ATK, DEF/SUP).

7) Point #1... so much. I really loved the sense of nostalgia in CQ1.

Just a thought. I wouldn't mind hearing what others thought about the game.

In reply to your suggestions:

1) Totally agree. I did miss this part of it, though I wouldn't call Auburn Pines rural. More of a suburb.

2) I agree, but they did implement this a bit with characters like the Mole and Snail which weren't part of the story in any way and had higher HP and attack levels than other characters in that area.

3) I agree with this too.

4) There is a mission that requires specific costumes to get to the final costume, maybe you just didn't find it yet. ;) And there is an achievement for wearing Candy Corn throughout all the battles in the game.

5) 4 of the costumes from the first game were available as a pre-order bonus for the PC version, though I also would've loved to have seen them in the PS4 version.

6) That's a neat idea.

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1. When you attack and get the timing right it shows 'green' to indicate that you earned more damage. Then when you counter an attack correctly and take less damage it's 'red.' To me, each correct timing action should be green. When I see the red during the counter attacks it makes me think I messed up.

This actually turned out to be a non-issue for me, but that was primarily due to the fact that I did not utilize counter-attacks all that often. I was also worse at timing counter-attacks than normal attacks using the overlapping ring mechanic.

2. An easier way to switch the cards. If there's going to be cool downs, that means I will be mixing up using the cards more. Maybe a button push that brings up a wheel where you can quickly select a card (like you do when changing costumes). Flipping through the Y menu is a tad cumbersome.

I liked the layout in the book, if only because it had the feel of a card collection. While there are a lot of Creepy Treat cards, I could see a system where you rotate the cards from back to front, bringing a new card to the front (and increasing its size) while the others are semi-minimized or hidden as the whole wheel is rotated.

3. I like that you can use candy to heal, but I am not a fan of the fountains. I feel like it's needlessly extending the length of the game.

Well the fountains, while entertaining to watch heal your party, were no as funny, IMHO, as the pay phone from CQ1 and the many different reasons you call the police. :)

1) Totally agree. I did miss this part of it, though I wouldn't call Auburn Pines rural. More of a suburb.

Agreed. Auburn Pines was definitely a suburb, and then the game progressed to a rural area with the farm/carnival area, which I also enjoyed. I thin CQ1 hits all the most memorable Halloween locations, at least for me.

2) I agree, but they did implement this a bit with characters like the Mole and Snail which weren't part of the story in any way and had higher HP and attack levels than other characters in that area.

The key issue I had with the mole and snail were that they were treated as minions. As such, their battles couldn't be easier with the help of the reverse damage and/or stun Creepy Treat cards. If they were treated as a mini-boss, and those cards had no effect on them, then that would have been more challenging.

4) There is a mission that requires specific costumes to get to the final costume, maybe you just didn't find it yet. ;) And there is an achievement for wearing Candy Corn throughout all the battles in the game.

I thought I had found every costume in CQ2. I don't recall any blank pages...

I do recall the Candy Corn challenge, which I did not take up. I was thinking that maybe, rather than for every battle, there could have been a lesser challenge to use Candy Corn in a short series of battles to unlock a reward.

Overall I really can't complain, these are minor issues for me and hardly kept me from playing. Of all the "issues" the only one that I really cared about was the nostalgia factor. I'm hoping that if they come out with DLC that it will focus on Auburn Pines and trick-or-treating. Obviously it can't involve the Repugnians, as they're on good terms with humans. Maybe time for a fresh face?

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1. When you attack and get the timing right it shows 'green' to indicate that you earned more damage. Then when you counter an attack correctly and take less damage it's 'red.'

Actually, the red means you are weak against the enemy type and therefore are taking more damage from attacks (Blocked or otherwise) and dealing less damage during attacks. Likewise, if you are strong against the enemy type, your attacks and blocks will be green, showing you are dealing more and taking less damage.

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Actually, the red means you are weak against the enemy type and therefore are taking more damage from attacks (Blocked or otherwise) and dealing less damage during attacks. Likewise, if you are strong against the enemy type, your attacks and blocks will be green, showing you are dealing more and taking less damage.

Now that you mention it, I vaguely recall working this out on my own. However, once I realized the icons adjacent to each monster name indicated their "type" (i.e. Tech, Monster, Magic), and so did each player character, I stopped noticing the colour of the damage text as I no longer relied on it to inform me of that combat detail.

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Actually, the red means you are weak against the enemy type and therefore are taking more damage from attacks (Blocked or otherwise) and dealing less damage during attacks. Likewise, if you are strong against the enemy type, your attacks and blocks will be green, showing you are dealing more and taking less damage.

Now that you mention it, I vaguely recall working this out on my own. However, once I realized the icons adjacent to each monster name indicated their "type" (i.e. Tech, Monster, Magic), and so did each player character, I stopped noticing the colour of the damage text as I no longer relied on it to inform me of that combat detail.

Yeah, same here. As I stated when I wrote originally I had just started, now I've finished. I think it dawned on me in the French Quarter.

I give the game high marked overall. I loved the story and the use of...oh never mind I don't want to ruin it for someone else with a spoiler. I'll just say I enjoyed the story more than the first one.

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I give the game high marked overall. I loved the story and the use of...oh never mind I don't want to ruin it for someone else with a spoiler. I'll just say I enjoyed the story more than the first one.

Yes, Double Fine did an excellent job with the plot. I would say it's easily as good as the original, IMHO, if not better. Again, my primary gripe was against the chosen locales, which took away from the overall sense of nostalgia. I think it would have been just as interesting if the time travel elements had been to, say, 1920's Auburn Heights. While the future is the future... not sure what could have been done there, given the plot (with regards to trick-or-treating nostalgia).

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They used the wrong green.

Sorry, that's a meme from the Oddworld Forums that started when people were nit picking New N Tasty like crazy. Not saying that's what you're doing. Apparently, I just felt like I needed to be involved right now.

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the only thing I would rivisit is the combat system, timing quick time events go stale very soon IMO, when a fight triggers always gives me the feeling to be a boring and repetitive interruption from the real game, good thing keeping the stamps as tricks and power ups, but perhaps a deeper fighting system wouldn't hurt

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