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Thimbleweed Park: A New Classic Point & Click Adventure FROM RON GILBERT! AND Gary Winnick

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Yup, it can be hard trying to achieve (almost) the same thing in low and high res. The original DOTT (like others) has its own consistent form, thickness and flat & shaded look due to the res/aliasing. There exist subtile but very recognizable differences and stuff which works in low res doesn't automagically work in high res and the other way around. It needs special treatment (look at the characters, specific areas in the scenes). New gamers might just be fine with the way it will be. It could have been nice seeing Grossman returning to adventures, after he left TTG.

3D has introduced many enhancements over 2D and is pushing the borders of what you can do in video games and serious applications but it's often still caged by todays common display and input devices. You can do great stuff in 3D when, project related, you don't get into conflict with its constrains or you're aware of these issues and can address them (controls/cameras/interfaces/awareness of what you can do & see/...). Some genres/games are making a good effort here. DF has a tendency of not caring enough about these things, which is unfortunate as they put all this efforts into the other aspects of their games already.

Anyway back to DOTT, the salt of the DOTT's RM lies within the documentary track and possible sfx enhancements (not sure about music yet, as the AbLib sound was just fine.) It would be nice if DF could add the original version this time (as they should have provided the original with GF RM too). Reasons: many platforms/resource friendly/ScummVM comfort/being able to play/own the original as well).

DOTT has focus and you already connect with new scenes because you know them from other timelines (pros and cons), which again they can use as a design element. What i disliked was that the timelines in the past and the future just weren't this exciting. I mean there could have been dinosaurs and stuff. There exist more interesting things than US history or the future they've shown but i very much enjoyed Bernard's timeline and thinking on these three connected layers. Sam & Max probably would have used this potential on a different level.

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The ONLY thing I don't like about this new age pixel-art is that most indie devs seem to miss the point of how graphics were designed to work in specific ways back then, many games on the NES/SNES/Genesis/Neo-Geo, etc, were designed to take scanlines and CRT bloom to their advantage, most "retro" games these days tend to look a bit flat, a bit too clean perhaps, for example that image above, it does look great, but if taken a step further to portray how it would actually look if it was on an old school "retro" system it would be closer to this:

http://i.imgur.com/31UKOy2.png

Now that might be a bit too much for some people, but I'm always surprised when these Retro devs don't at least offer the option of Scanlines and CRT effects, or even take up the challenge of designing their artwork to take advantage of these effects.

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The best is when you scroll such content.

Yep, i also often have to think of this when watching all the retro stuff.

Curved TVs, monochrome (green/amber) monitors, higher quality computer CRTs, digital displays, retina displays. Pixels came a long way. On a typical home computer CRT the gfx weren't as sharp and direct like on todays displays (the video signal from your gfx chip/card/da-converter mattered a lot) which blurred the content and (together with blacklines) increased the otherwise low resolutions you could afford for games related content. Nontheless we were sitting pretty close to those displays and enjoyed the gfx a lot. The 1081's afterglow was fantastic for smooth movements with contrast. The worst things i remember were Amiga's PAL interlacing mode and early days VR goggles, these hurt in your eyes and head real quick.

Magnetic Realms did a nice job with Inescapable (looking forward to Exile's End) in trying to achieve such a look.

Naturally these limitations influenced your designs, you took advantage of them or tried to avoid certain stuff. Earlier LucasArts adventures had a clean look for their sprites, well chosen colours/tinted outlines. It depends on your style but it can be easier coming up with a nice pixeld gfx than something which looks convincing and consistent in high res. Some artists shine with pixels, others show their true talent in high res. The Wadjet Eyes games often look wrong to me, they make me want high res. You also might want to differ between 2D and 3D, 3D often cries for high res whilst low res still looks nice in 2D, also without any CRT mimicking. Filters and interpolation in ScummVM looks rather bad, better going with something like plain x4 instead.

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It would be cool if Gilbert decides to release his adventure engine. After the game will be finished and there will have been time to relax and preparing the code. Looking at the available options, i think there exists a lack of a focused, modern, crossy and not bloated engine for these type of games. It might be able to get some people into programming or playing around with this stuff. Others might use it for non-/commercial work (as long as the source is provided). AGS/...just aren't sexy options. I'm glad that he decided to write his own. Btw. Terrible Toybox is a ter... nice name.

This also was one of the aspects DF went silent about during the end of the campaign.

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