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Questions for the DoTT Remastered Team

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I would have liked to see a small orchestra version of this. Most of the soundtrack doesn't demand a big orchestra sound, but live sounds would be nice. But it's very expensive for such a large soundtrack, so I guess this time they're going with just trying to improve the sounds used.

I think this can be done well, too.

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It's true though. Because now you can load a lot more information into memory and also process a lot more, very accurately reproducing the sounds of certain instruments and the locations in which they are played has become within the realms of possibility and every year it's getting better.

I made this version of the Largo theme from MI2 from memory, https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/20534082/largo.mp3 using some of my new instruments, and I think the bassoon and clarinet sound great. And that was my first go with them. Listen to how good it's got to modeling things like the transitions between notes, and how natural those clarinet glissandi sound compared to regular midi pitch bend.

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In case it wasn't clear, I was being pedantic about the use of "literally"! (So no, no it is not true :P)

No, it wasn't clear, sorry haha :PP I guess some figures of speech just don't translate well from italian to english, my bad

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In case it wasn't clear, I was being pedantic about the use of "literally"! (So no, no it is not true :P)

No, it wasn't clear, sorry haha :PP I guess some figures of speech just don't translate well from italian to english, my bad

Your English was perfect -- it's just a recent change in English that some of us (myself included) aren't fans of.

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Also, note that they don't ONLY use real instruments. They mix it which can sound really good in my opinion.

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Nope. I don't want to wait until the Full Throttle dev questions to get an answer!

I've got so much hype for this one, and not as much for Full Throttle, but it's still a lot! :)

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Nope. I don't want to wait until the Full Throttle dev questions to get an answer!

But didn't you get an answer with the flying Edsel?

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But didn't you get an answer with the flying Edsel?

Hmm. Debatable. I'd very much like to hear Tim's explanation.

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Cool, me too :)

I didn't get around to posting in the other thread that the landscape they drive through in DOTT feels quite Full Throttle-y!

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I never really considered that. Although I imagine the scenery in DOTT to be New England-y... and yet we see them driving through canyons and things. How weird!

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If anyone could confirm the requirements it would help a lot , i got burnt pre ordering grim fandango thanks to its steep requirements

Minimum system requirements - Windows: XP (Service Pack 3) / Vista / 7 / 8 / 10

Processor: 1.7 GHz Dual Core

Memory: 2 GB

Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 260, ATI Radeon 4870 HD, Intel HD 3000, or equivalent card with at least 512 MB VRAM

DirectX Version: 9.0

Disk Space: 2.5 GB

Sound Card: DirectX Compatible Sound Card

Additional Notes: Must have OpenGL 3 with GLSL version 1.3

Recommended system requirements - Windows: 7 / 8 / 10

Processor: Intel Core 2 Duo at 2.2 GHz, AMD Athlon 64 2.2 GHz

Memory: 3 GB

Graphics: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460, AMD Radeon HD 6850

DirectX Version: 11

Disk Space: 2.5 GB

Sound Card; DirectX Compatible Sound Card

Additional Notes: Must have OpenGL 3 with GLSL version 1.3

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Now that this is pretty much complete, any chance of a peek at the Singapore version assets. For history purposes :). No doubt Double Fines is the best but I would love to see what may have happened.

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Now that this is pretty much complete, any chance of a peek at the Singapore version assets. For history purposes :). No doubt Double Fines is the best but I would love to see what may have happened.

Spaff posted this in December, so probably not, unfortunately:

@thunderpeel and other guys asking, please stop asking about the 'Singapore version' - we're not allowed to comment on the theoretical existence or non existence of it and I don't want anyone to get in trouble!

I know it's dumb, but that's the way it is right now - if anything changes I'll letcha know!

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In response to some of the music oriented questions, Matt's wrangled us this lovely writeup:

The technical high level explanation of how the midi sound stuff works on PS4…

We're basically using the FMOD low-level library as a back-end solution that the original iMUSE audio engine drives. Day of the Tentacle music was all in MIDI format but their MIDI sequencer implementation did a lot more that just play a MIDI file. It provided a way to create a more dynamic audio experience that supported track fade in/out & looping. It also had the ability in real-time to do things like:

* Adjust playback speed with key correction

* Transpose the output by +/- 12 semitones

* Detune

* Fade in/out specific instrument parts

In addition to the iMUSE feature-set, we're also supporting the playback of both a 'Remastered' and 'Classic' set of musical tracks. 'Remastered' tracks are re-voiced waveform versions of the original MIDI file with higher fidelity instruments and 'Classic' tracks are waveforms that are output from an emulated Yamaha OPL3 FM Synthesis chip.

The Yamaha OPL-3 FM was a discrete chip on the SoundBlaster 16 to construct audio from the MIDI data. SoundBlaster 16 also supported 16-bit digital audio sampling & CD-audio input on the card in addition to the MIDI sound synthesis. The original Day of the Tentacle music was MIDI format & the 'talkie' voice data and sound effects were digital audio. Therefore the SoundBlaster 16 would have used both the discrete Yamaha OPL-3 FM chip as well as the digital audio processing.

Both 'Remastered' and 'Classic' tracks are generated offline and then encoded into a platform-specific format (AT9 for Sony) and then placed in an FMOD sound bank. When a track is selected for playback, both the 'Remastered' and 'Classic' tracks are enabled side-by-side so the user can switch between them in real-time. If there's an additional dynamic instrument part to be faded in/out, that is a separate track set to playback along with the main track.

* iMUSE is pulling all of the strings and FMOD allows us to still support the original iMUSE feature-set:

* All music tracks contain a DSP Pitch Shift which allowed us to use Detune, Transpose & Key Correction messages from iMUSE.

* We're also letting iMUSE adjust the playback speed of a track which was used in various places from the original game.

* The simplistic ability to stream from FMOD sound banks allowed us to focus on keeping the game audio feel as original as possible.

* The profiler allowed us to know exactly what iMUSE was doing behind the scenes.

* The game is running on multiple platforms & we only needed to write one implementation that wrapped the FMOD library interface while still taking advantage of hardware audio decoding on Sony systems.

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Answered Questions

Have you tried getting access to the uncompressed recordings for the foreign languange dubs as well? - Laserschwert

Matt: We tried to get hold of the original German recordings but unfortunately were not able to. The studio who recorded them was long ago acquired by another company, and despite contacting them (thanks to Laserschwert for the help!) we could not find the recordings.

The German dubbed voices present in Resmastererd sound pretty clear to me. Certainly less compressed than the voices in the original English release. If these aren't the original recordings, where did they come from?

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Answered Questions

Have you tried getting access to the uncompressed recordings for the foreign languange dubs as well? - Laserschwert

Matt: We tried to get hold of the original German recordings but unfortunately were not able to. The studio who recorded them was long ago acquired by another company, and despite contacting them (thanks to Laserschwert for the help!) we could not find the recordings.

The German dubbed voices present in Resmastererd sound pretty clear to me. Certainly less compressed than the voices in the original English release. If these aren't the original recordings, where did they come from?

We only up sampled them to 48khz. Nothing was done to clean them up because the compression noise is all throughout the frequency spectrum.

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If the audio for DOTT was available sitting around on DAT tapes, does that mean that all the LucasArts audio is sitting on DAT tapes? Indiana Jones? Sam and Max Hit The Road? The Dig?

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Hi fellow tentacle-friends... or tentaclers...

I had the pleasure and honor to work on all of Tim's adventure game remasters and I have to say I absolutely love bringing these old classics back. As a programmer I find it fascinating to dig through the original source. In a way I feel like a "code archaeologist" because I can see how game technology has changed over the years. I'd argue that this knowledge also helped us when working on Broken Age.

Anyway I wanted to answer a few of the unanswered questions. :-)

Will a version of Maniac Mansion be included with the special edition of the game similar to how it was originally included? If so i assume it won’t be a remastered remake all its own, but could it be a scummvm compatible copy such as dos v2 or the commodore 64 version? - Permafry_42, Alfred J

Yep. We included the EGA version of MM.

Will the classic Verb System still be used in the Special Edition? - tob_edison

Will the game crop out the verb/inventory bar for a 16:9 presentation? - Monkey Mania

We wanted to give you guys the choice, so you can play both the remastered as well as the original version with and without the verb-bar. I'm biased of course, but I think the programming team did an amazing job adding a retro-looking verb coin interface to the original version.

Are there gonna be a hint system of some description for new players? - RMJ

Nope. All the puzzles all the fun! ;-)

Someone should ask Oliver something super technical so we can all sit back in awe wondering what he is talking about. - matthansen

Hmm... a bit vague Mr. Matt Hansen. :-P

With DotT we had the advantage that we could build on top of the technology developed for the 'special edition' versions of Monkey Island (internally we called the 'remonkeyed' versions at LucasArts). Since I wrote a lot of that code myself while working at LucasArts it felt a bit like coming home. We did update a bunch of our art pipeline tools to make it easier for the artists and animators to create the updated graphics. Of course there was still a lot of other stuff to do. Making the old SCUMM engine run on 64 bit machines took a bit of work. Matt already posted some information about how the audio was remastered, so please check that out too.

One thing that always amazed me when working on the remastered versions is that some of the techniques used back then are surprisingly hard to recreate with today's tech. The best example is the palette animation. Back in day games could often only use 256 colors due to memory and performance constraints. So pixels of an sprite would be represented by a single byte (value range 0 to 255) which contained the index of the color to use. The actual color (represented by RGB values) were stored in a (color) palette.

One nice side effect of this indirection is that the colors in the palette could be changed over time, so when a sprite is drawn it would look different. This was often used for ambient animations like water or fire (Palette color animation example).

These days we don't have these limitations anymore and therefore pixels are represented by RGB values directly, which means that we can use way more colors (24bit: 16777216 vs. 8bit: 256). This makes it much more complicated to create these color animations though, because there are more colors that would need to be changed over time and it's not trivial to animation only a sub-section of the image (if blue is changed over time then all blue pixels in the sprite will be affected).

This technique was used a lot in DotT. For example the spinning spiral in the beginning of the game is done using a palette animation. We ended up re-creating the effect by rendering fullscreen sprites created by an animator. In Monkey Island special editions we often used shader and particle effects to represent these effects.

You programmers out there are probably now thinking: "Couldn't you use a color look-up texture?" You are absolutely right of course. We found however that it's pretty hard to author sprites this way and one of our main goals was to make the artist workflow as intuitive as possible. Having said that we are using a similar technique in one of our upcoming games. I won't say which one though! :-P

Anywho... this is all I have time for today. Let me know if you guys have other (perhaps more specific) technical questions.

Oliver.

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