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Finished Broken Age? Discuss here! (Including Spoilers)

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Here's the review I put out on Steam:

Full Disclosure: I am a backer of Broken Age on Kickstarter. You can find me in the credits listed under backers as 'Samuel "Iron Curtain" Abram'. I will try to be as spoiler-free as possible when reviewing the game. I'll start with the bad first:

CONS:

1. Plotwise, after setting us up in Act 1, Act 2 answered some questions but also raised others in their stead, even after going to every room and exhausting every dialogue option. It felt like there should be an act 3 but that's not happening unfortunately.

2. The final sequence was extremely underwhelming and anti-climactic, as was the ending. When I wanted an epilogue, I was given it, but only in a form of a WALL-E-style credits montage rather than actually watching a cutscene or discovering through gameplay, which I would prefer.

PROS:

1. Absolutely gorgeous artwork. Gorgeous Art Style. Not to mention original and inspired. I give it two thumbs way up!

2. Puzzles made sense and were logical. They were easy in Act 1 and got harder in Act 2 but I was still able to solve them all without a walkthrough (with only one exception). This is in contrast to Grim Fandango, wherein I had to consult a walkthrough frequently and when I found the solution, I thought "That's insane! I never would have thought of that!".

3. Characters are interesting and well-fleshed out. I actually care about everybody other than the two main protagonists!

4. Dialogue is funny and full of Schafer's trademark wit.

FINAL SCORE: 8.25 out of 10. BUY THIS GAME!

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Are you sure? Pressing SPACE is only to skip cutscene-type sequences. But you can skip through lines of dialogue. It's been several days since I played it, but I'm pretty sure it was just by clicking one of the mouse buttons. Don't know how it would work on non-PC platforms, though.

Perhaps it is another key? For certain, neither left nor right mouse button skip dialogue lines. I played it on Steam on Windows 8.

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Are you sure? Pressing SPACE is only to skip cutscene-type sequences. But you can skip through lines of dialogue. It's been several days since I played it, but I'm pretty sure it was just by clicking one of the mouse buttons. Don't know how it would work on non-PC platforms, though.

Perhaps it is another key? For certain, neither left nor right mouse button skip dialogue lines. I played it on Steam on Windows 8.

The default key for that is the Spacebar! It skips cutscenes and dialogues. I remapped mine to my middle mouse button so I can one hand it :D

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Perhaps it is another key? For certain, neither left nor right mouse button skip dialogue lines. I played it on Steam on Windows 8.

The default key for that is the Spacebar! It skips cutscenes and dialogues. I remapped mine to my middle mouse button so I can one hand it :D

What I mean is skipping dialogue lines, not the whole dialogue. Like all the SCUMM games i played which would skip dialogue lines using the '.' button.

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I just beat it. I think I might write a longer post about how many things I liked about the game later on, but right I will just say that Double Fine gave me pretty much exactly the game I wanted and hoped for when I backed it.

The one thing that I really didn't like were the wiring puzzles. I haven't really read this whole thread, so maybe it has already been discussed here, but I really didn't get the logic behind them. They weren't dificult, but dissapointing. And I think the last part would have been better if there had been some kind of communication between Shay and Vella.

Other then that, it was a fantastic game. I liked that the ending didn't try to explain everything. It would have been too much of a midichlorian situation to get a lengthy explanation of everything.

I will write more later, but I just want to say thank you to the whole team for aiming this high with this title. The art, sound, music, puzzles, story, characters, voice over and dialogues all gives this game a staying power that few, if any adventure titles have come close the last 15 years.

// $100 backer

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Some of the puzzles seemed like total guess work. What was the logic for converting the music sheet into a star chart? I tried a 1 to 1 comparison but it didn't hold, I just looked up a guide online after I couldn't get it to work. Also I felt like some information was missing from the tricking Shay's Mother series, I wrote down all knowns and there are still so many assumptions to be made that it came down to guess work. I brute forced the puzzle but I hate solutions like that, why can't I complete the logic for it?

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Here's my longer post about my feelings as a backer of the game after beating it:

I really want to thank Double Fine for really making a game for us backers, ignoring the fears so many have for the genre, and bringing back the good stuff from old classics like Monkey Island 2 and Day of the Tentacle. I do think that this game is worthy of being mentioned in the same league as those game, because of the understanding of the genre the team has shown.

I hope that this post is a convincing way of saying how good I thought this was, and that it's because of the genuine qualities of the games, and not just nostalgia, enthusiasm, well wishing or something similiar.

The story in the game, is one that I don't want to say too much about right now, since I want to think it over more, and let my feelings about it settle a bit. That I feel that need says a lot about the writing, and if I do land at the conclusion that I don't feel that all of it makes sense, then that process alone makes the story much more worthwhile then most others in the genre recently.

What I liked about the game:

I backed the game at the $100 level, and my expecations was that Double Fine would make a point&click; adventure game that was influenced by classics like Monkey Island and Day of the Tentacle. But I wanted that influence to be based not on story or graphics, but on the gameplay and puzzle structure. And it turns out that the team really got this right. And I base that on these three aspects of Broken Age:

1. The freedom of movement - Instead of locking the player in a linear sequence of scenes, we got the open structure of Monkey Island back. Just like the way you got move around Melee Island, or Dr. Freds mansion in DOTT, we were free to explore Bossa Nostra, Merriloft and Shellmound. This is at least for me, an extremely important factor in making the games interactivity feel important. And I think this is the thing modern adventure games otherwise mostly miss. The linear progression in Swords&Sorcery;, or the restricted amount of scenes in Machinarium makes them feel like lesser games to mee.

2. The puzzle chains - Also an underestimated aspect of adventure games that I really like. This really adds to the feeling of non-linearity and enjoyment, and really helps when you're stuck at a puzzle. When I start act 2 with Shay, and get a goal that's divided into separate clear tasks, then I'm really getting what I wanted from the game.

3. The variation of puzzles - I always said that the difference between Monkey Island 1&2 and Curse/Escape are that (among other things) the latter lacks any real sense of creativity in the puzzles. The first games had things like the insult swordfighting, the dance lessons, the spitting contest, following the store keeper, the skeleton song, etc, while Curse/Escape just repeated the most obvious things from the previous games, without bringing anything really new. Broken Age had the elevators, the space weaver, the tree jokes, the knot puzzle (I liked this one, solved it in 15 min), the ph level, etc. While I can see how some people might not have loved all of these, the variation and the creativity was one of the things I really hoped that this project would bring back.

These were the ones I feel most other titles just doesn't do as well. Maybe they're not that important to others, but for me, they are the things that really separates the LucasArts classics from the rest, and they are the ones that I feel make the game as being made for me, which really is the best grade you can give a kickstarter.

What I didn't like:

It wouldn't feel that convincing if I had only praise, because very few projects, if any, are worth praise alone. And there are things about Broken Age I didn't like.

1. The wiring puzzles and the logic that what one character saw, helped the other. They should have been selfcontained puzzles for Shay and Vella. I though these went against the games own logic, and tainted the game a bit.

2. That you could pause the arm delivering cereal wasn't all an obvious thing. I did solve it on my own, but it was more luck then a real attempt.

3. In the story, I think that you maybe should have gotten a bit more explanation as to why Mom and Dad were pictured as computers and then later as living persons. I'm not really following the train of thought here.

4. While I'm not sure that I actually would have wanted any scene cut, Vellas part in Act 2 felt a bit long and repeated. Shays part felt like one act, while Vellas felt like three or four, which was a bit much. But I don't what parts I would have wanted cut, because I loved the hexipals and yarn pals in these parts.

5. The Mog Chotra song in Shellmound was a bit cringe worthy, sorry to say that. :)

6. I liked that the tasks given to Shay in Act 2 are seperate goals, but when the fish I need to show to Carol is given by completing the task with H'rmony, then it makes those puzzles depedent on each other, which is a bit unfortunate IMHO.

What suprised me in a positive way:

But a game with flaws need some standout things that gives it a staying power to be a classic, and Broken Age has these.

1. The amount of extra dialogue is so extremely impressive. I had several sessions playing this where I just went around and used knife, spoon and Grabbing Gary on everything. This aspect added to the enjoyment, the staying power, and to the replayability. I kinda feel like starting over again immediately just to see what dialogues I missed.

2.The game is like a series of painting coming alive, and it really is the art style I didn't know I wanted. Some have suggested that Double Fine should have choosen a simpler one for the sake of the project, but I don't think the game would have been half the game it is today without it.

3. The characters are the ones you want to talk about, and I'm impressed how Act 2 expanded on pretty much of all them. The hexipals, Grabbing Gary, the yarn palls, the dead eye god druids the tree, Curtis, etc. All great, all classic.

4. The voice actors did a really good job in this game, and did their part to bring a sense of quality to the game. Elijah Wood was a perfect choice for Shay. The voice actors were great overall, but I think Elijah did it the best. Jack Black did a pretty good job great also.

5. The ability to change between the characters to experience the narrative from Shay's and Vella's viewpoints as you wanted worked much better then I thought. An bit like, DOTT, but different enough to feel fresht.

Another thing that impressed by was how well integrated the puzzles felt in the story and the progression. Things like the tree jokes, the snake, Carol's fishing, Harm'ny's cloud, etc. It felt so extremely well integrated in the game. As did all the hints. These were very often very nicely done, like Shay and the snake, that I thought I got six or seven hints about, without any of them being too much. I would argue that this aspect hasn't been better done any time before in the genre. Besides the "Shay knows what Vella knows" logic in the wiring puzzles, it really felt that it connected everything in a very logic way.

I also want to give some extra cred to the sound. Things like the echoes in the ships at Shay's "command bridge" and in the core reactor, really brought an extra sense of quality to the game.

Summary of what I thought about the result:

I've heard people asking where all the money from the kickstarter went, and why it took so long, but I think the answer is there in the game, if you're just paying attention. Broken Age is a game with an amazing attention to detail, that really pays homeage to old classics, while still staying relevant today by bringin it's own ideas. I couldn't be happier with the result.

I backed this game with $100, and I'm absolutely prepared to back further projects from Double Fine for similiar amounts.

I hope that the whole team feel proud of this games. To reach this level of quality in so many different aspects of the game, show such understanding for the genre and deliver to so many different platforms while being watched by so many people and generating these crazy expectations is extremely impressive.

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Some of the puzzles seemed like total guess work. What was the logic for converting the music sheet into a star chart? I tried a 1 to 1 comparison but it didn't hold, I just looked up a guide online after I couldn't get it to work. Also I felt like some information was missing from the tricking Shay's Mother series, I wrote down all knowns and there are still so many assumptions to be made that it came down to guess work. I brute forced the puzzle but I hate solutions like that, why can't I complete the logic for it?

If you look at the paper on the wall by the door in Alex's ship, it has the same pattern Shay used to go to "Danger Zone 5" (Shellmound) but it looks like sheet music, and Alex talks about how his ship was used musical navigation while Shay's was based on knitting. Then if you talk to Alex (or maybe you have to use the pitch pipes on him) he will play the song that he "used to return to where he last was".

I don't think the line about musical navigation was repeated after you first heard it, that could have been your problem.

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Some of the puzzles seemed like total guess work. What was the logic for converting the music sheet into a star chart? I tried a 1 to 1 comparison but it didn't hold, I just looked up a guide online after I couldn't get it to work. Also I felt like some information was missing from the tricking Shay's Mother series, I wrote down all knowns and there are still so many assumptions to be made that it came down to guess work. I brute forced the puzzle but I hate solutions like that, why can't I complete the logic for it?

If you look at the paper on the wall by the door in Alex's ship, it has the same pattern Shay used to go to "Danger Zone 5" (Shellmound) but it looks like sheet music, and Alex talks about how his ship was used musical navigation while Shay's was based on knitting. Then if you talk to Alex (or maybe you have to use the pitch pipes on him) he will play the song that he "used to return to where he last was".

I don't think the line about musical navigation was repeated after you first heard it, that could have been your problem.

That is what I used but I had no idea how to turn the music into a pattern.

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I had a great time! I thought Act 1 was a bit too easy and really enjoyed the upped difficulty and the amount of puzzles in Act 2. Playing the two acts together I think they have a good progression and now I enjoy the easier part of Act 1 preparing me for Act 2.

Shay Act 2 and the ending was my favourite parts of the game. For Shay Act 2, I liked the intertwined puzzles and that you needed to check Vella's side in order to get some solutions. There was also some nice features on the space ship that tied together neatly with Shays story. (Adorable Mister Huggy being one of them!) The ending was my favourite, I was happy to see Vella and Shay having a cooperative puzzle.

Enjoyed the game immensely and I am glad that I backed. (Note: I would also buy a hexagon pal in a heartbeat.)

My expectations were that there would be more cooperation between Vella and Shay, much like Day of the Tentacle where the characters affected each other's storylines. Seeing the story however, I understand how that would be difficult to achieve. I liked that there were at least some interaction between Shay and Vella.

The wire puzzle was enjoyable, it was great having to bring out the ole pen and paper to make charts. Finally a game for that!

What I mean is skipping dialogue lines, not the whole dialogue. Like all the SCUMM games i played which would skip dialogue lines using the '.' button.

This was a peeve for me as well. It was most apparent for me in the knot puzzle, where I would ask F'ther about what the knot would look like, instictively press space to skip his dialogue, realize I had skipped seeing the knot and so had to ask him again, listen to his starting dialogue before finally seeing an image of the knot. It's a minor peeve but if it's a five minute fix that can be done in a bug patch then I might as well mention it. ;)

Hope that the engine works well for more point-and-clicks in the future and that you guys at DF hasn't tired completely of this type of game after developing Broken Age. :)

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That is what I used but I had no idea how to turn the music into a pattern.

Having subtitles on would have spoiled it for you pretty fast.

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Hey, I just had a thought. Anyone tried using that last-location music pattern during act 1, before you discover it?

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Finished it last week. Overall, really enjoyed both Act 1 and Act 2. DF seems to have taken feedback of the lack of difficulty in Act 1 pretty seriously. The puzzles in Act 2 were great and had me taking out a notepad.

The ending felt a bit rushed, though. Really sudden and a bit under-developed. The villain was a bit meh for me, too. The world of Broken Age is an amazing one and i wish i could see more of it. Really enjoyed the dialogue in both acts and i just love all the yarn friends of Shay. Poor Gary. ):

Don't regret backing the project one bit. I greatly enjoyed the game and the doc was an amazing insight into game development. Will back any future DF projects on a whim.

I pretend to do a review/video-review of the game, but that's for later. One more playthrough, too.

There is going to be one more episode, right?

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1. The wiring puzzles and the logic that what one character saw, helped the other. They should have been selfcontained puzzles for Shay and Vella. I though these went against the games own logic, and tainted the game a bit.

The player is supposed to be an active force within the game universe, something like an intuition for the characters. No, I didn't get that feeling at all either. But technically, the puzzles didn't go against the game's own logic. If anything, that role of the player should have been made more explicit in some way.

When I first heard that the game would be about two characters and that you could switch between them, I was hoping for a DotT-style interaction between the characters, which I absolutely loved. I still consider it a missed chance to make this happen, at least in Act 2, where the characters knew of each other and could have influenced each other. (I guess the Plague Dam part contains some of this but it's very minimal and if anything only goes against the conventional wisdom that had been established in the game up to that point that the two timelines are completely independent mechanically, even when they interact story-wise.)

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Hey, I just had a thought. Anyone tried using that last-location music pattern during act 1, before you discover it?

Maybe that's the "secret puzzle." I remember reading about that there is some secret puzzle that they don't expect the players to find out anytime soon.

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The player is supposed to be an active force within the game universe, something like an intuition for the characters. No, I didn't get that feeling at all either. But technically, the puzzles didn't go against the game's own logic. If anything, that role of the player should have been made more explicit in some way.

I think knowing this part will add a bit of enjoyment when you replay the game at least. And the replayability of the game is really one of the most impressive aspects of the game. There are so many details, dialogues and layers in the story to discover even if you have already beaten it. The story and scenes are really sticking, and I've spent quite some time thinking over a couple of the scenes today :).

The more I think about it, the more satisfied I am with the ending.

The one I'm still unsure about are the parent's role for Shay, how they were seen as computers in the Act 1, and real persons in Act 2. And for how long were Shay really in the ship, considering how quickly it could return to the plague dam?

When I first heard that the game would be about two characters and that you could switch between them, I was hoping for a DotT-style interaction between the characters, which I absolutely loved. I still consider it a missed chance to make this happen, at least in Act 2, where the characters knew of each other and could have influenced each other. (I guess the Plague Dam part contains some of this but it's very minimal and if anything only goes against the conventional wisdom that had been established in the game up to that point that the two timelines are completely independent mechanically, even when they interact story-wise.)

I thought that it was what they were going to do, but I'm glad that they didn't. I think it would have messed up the puzzles too much if you had been able to send items back and forth. If anything, I would maybe have liked to seen them being more aware of each others goals, at least in the absolute last part. But I think that they mostly handled the character switching and different perspectives very nicely.

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There is going to be one more episode, right?

Yes, one more episode of the doc! :)

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I basically agree with most of what CecilRousso has said about the game. Except for a few things! I totally agree with his first three criticisms....

but...

4. While I’m not sure that I actually would have wanted any scene cut, Vellas part in Act 2 felt a bit long and repeated. Shays part felt like one act, while Vellas felt like three or four, which was a bit much. But I don’t what parts I would have wanted cut, because I loved the hexipals and yarn pals in these parts.

5. The Mog Chotra song in Shellmound was a bit cringe worthy, sorry to say that. smile

6. I liked that the tasks given to Shay in Act 2 are seperate goals, but when the fish I need to show to Carol is given by completing the task with H’rmony, then it makes those puzzles depedent on each other, which is a bit unfortunate IMHO.

I really liked the over all length of the game. I sort of see where Cecil is coming from with 4) but I don't think they could have done much about it, the only think that might have worked better is making act 1 longer and act 2 slightly shorter, but I don't think that was possible.

I thought the Mog Chothra song was hilarious, it's one of my favourite bits in Act 1.

I don't have too much of a problem with interdependent puzzles, that's how I remember adventure games working - sometimes you wouldn't have the thing you need just because it's part of another puzzle. Guess this just didn't bother me!

But apart from that, I think that post summarises my feeling about the game pretty well!

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You know, direct communication between Shay and Vella might have been possible. Shay presumably still had the earpiece that Marek gave him. I wonder if that was ever going to come into play at any point during the design process.

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I really liked the over all length of the game. I sort of see where Cecil is coming from with 4) but I don't think they could have done much about it, the only think that might have worked better is making act 1 longer and act 2 slightly shorter, but I don't think that was possible.

Yeah, I liked the length of the game. I just thought that Vella's part felt a bit repeated, but that said, it also contained some of the best bits of the game. Like her and Dutch at the start, the yarn pals and "dangerous from a philisophic view", the return of the space weaver and her nasty comments about Marek. :) So I'm not sure how I would have wanted it differently.

And that is something I feel about the whole game, it's very few things I would have wanted done differnently.

I don't have too much of a problem with interdependent puzzles, that's how I remember adventure games working - sometimes you wouldn't have the thing you need just because it's part of another puzzle. Guess this just didn't bother me!

But apart from that, I think that post summarises my feeling about the game pretty well!

I don't have a problem with interdependent puzzles either in general. It's just that here I think you can solve all tasks given to Shay indepedent from each other, besides just this part, where one task becomes depedent on another because of one item. A pretty awesome item though :). Laughed at loud at it.

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You know, direct communication between Shay and Vella might have been possible. Shay presumably still had the earpiece that Marek gave him. I wonder if that was ever going to come into play at any point during the design process.

Actually a good point. There's no reason to suppose it wouldn't have a long range, and I can imagine a fun way of delivering the puzzle information could have been have Vella tell stuff to Marek and have Shay hear that, or have Marek accidentally leaking stuff back that he heard from Shay.

"I am afraid that young Shay may not last long, left to his own devices in the Badlands. In the latest transmissions from him he seems to be under attack from a snake known as 'Mr. Huggy'." or something.

It wouldn't work in all cases, but I feel like they could have done something with that.

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Shay mentions that the solution is back in the ship but he has hard time to remember the details. Which means he didn't get that knowledge out of nowhere.

Outside of that, I suspect that something was cut.

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You know, direct communication between Shay and Vella might have been possible. Shay presumably still had the earpiece that Marek gave him. I wonder if that was ever going to come into play at any point during the design process.

Actually a good point. There's no reason to suppose it wouldn't have a long range, and I can imagine a fun way of delivering the puzzle information could have been have Vella tell stuff to Marek and have Shay hear that, or have Marek accidentally leaking stuff back that he heard from Shay.

"I am afraid that young Shay may not last long, left to his own devices in the Badlands. In the latest transmissions from him he seems to be under attack from a snake known as 'Mr. Huggy'." or something.

It wouldn't work in all cases, but I feel like they could have done something with that.

I actually assumed they were going to do this at some point in Act 2 and was very surprised when they didn't. The earpiece seemed like the perfect way to get communication going on between the two.

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If they were going to do some communication thing between them then I'm glad that they didn't as I like it that the first time that they can talk to each other is at the end.

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I am a fan of Tim's work and I am very empathic towards Double Fine (sad to watch the part with the layoffs), but I really didn't like the game. I know the main idea was to show on the documentary the building of an adventure from scratch, including the story, but this clearly had a huge impact in how disjointed the story is presented and how the puzzles have a insane u-turn from being childishly simple in Act I to trial and error infuriating in Act II.

There were lots of cool things, like the documentary, the art and the voice acting, but that was just "extra sauce", what I wanted was a adventure that was as memorable as Monkey, DotT, Full Throttle, Grim...

Those damn robot rewires, omg, someone is going to adventure hell after this.

And the story felt like the writer changed his mind in act 2 and needed to rewrite some things in act 1, but that was not possible since it was already released. Parents are not computers? No way to explore Marek's world to take him down? A bridge solves the problem? Oh man...

Again, I understand it was the whole idea to make the game from scratch, concept and all, but next time you go to KS, have a full game fleshed out and most of the story figured out.

I was hoping this could be the adventure rebirth, but, nope, we will keep looking back to the great adventure classics.

PS: I am pretty sure there is a lot of spelling mistakes, I will play the non-native speaker card.

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I was hoping this could be the adventure rebirth, but, nope, we will keep looking back to the great adventure classics.

Well, pretty much all of them are more difficult and challenging then Broken Age: Act 2 though.

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I was hoping this could be the adventure rebirth, but, nope, we will keep looking back to the great adventure classics.

Well, pretty much all of them are more difficult and challenging then Broken Age: Act 2 though.

Hard doesn't mean obtuse. Those robot rewirings were so bad I almost stoped playing - and they were not even hard, they were just very boring and repetitive. Also a few bad puzzles are ok, but act 2 has so many of them (timing puzzles, brute force puzzles, backtracking 100 screens the whole time, puzzle that needed telepathic link between characters...) when I finished a puzzle I didn't feel smarter, I just felt bored and wishing it would improve or be over soon.

And the 2nd aspect was the story, act 2 was so bland and clearly cut short. It made no sense, I didn't care at all. Some bad puzzles might be overlooked when you have an amazing story that captures you, but Broken Age story made so little sense. There was so much potential in act 1, but then act 2 just white washes the story into a bland fetch quest with hardly anything surprising or interesting.

But you are free to like it, of course, this is just my opinion.

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Hard doesn't mean obtuse.

People keep saying that as an argument, but I still want to know what old classics that hadn't puzzles that can be called obtuse? I won't defend telephatic link puzzles in this game between them, since I didn't get that either, but other then that I think none of the puzzles in Broken Age were anymore obtuse then what old adventure games had. I would argue that this game actually had more hints, context and purpose for the puzzles then most of the classics.

What you actually think about the game is not really my concern or something I want to argue about, but posts similiar like yours makes me think a large portion of the internet aren't treating modern adventure games the same way the classics were treated. It makes me wonder how a game like Monkey Island 2 would have been received today if it had been released with the same expectation, with the backtracking, the monkey wrench, the parent's dance lesson puzzles, the elevator sequence, the ending, etc.

And just to be clear, this is not me calling Broke Age flawless or anything. It isn't.

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Hard doesn't mean obtuse.

People keep saying that as an argument, but I still want to know what old classics that hadn't puzzles that can be called obtuse? I won't defend telephatic link puzzles in this game between them, since I didn't get that either, but other then that I think none of the puzzles in Broken Age were anymore obtuse then what old adventure games had. I would argue that this game actually had more hints, context and purpose for the puzzles then most of the classics.

What you actually think about the game is not really my concern or something I want to argue about, but posts similiar like yours makes me think a large portion of the internet aren't treating modern adventure games the same way the classics were treated. It makes me wonder how a game like Monkey Island 2 would have been received today if it had been released with the same expectation, with the backtracking, the monkey wrench, the parent's dance lesson puzzles, the elevator sequence, the ending, etc.

And just to be clear, this is not me calling Broke Age flawless or anything. It isn't.

Have to agree with Cecil.

The wiring puzzles were great and very reminiscent of the type of puzzle you would have to solve in the old Myst games. (Although having to repeatedly rewire the robots over and over again during the final sequence is a valid--but I think minor--criticism.)

Recently someone pointed out--and I think perhaps correctly--that point-and-click games were sort of "saved" by Telltale taking them in a new story-focused direction. It sort of reignited people's interest in point-and-click style games. But Telltale's games, like The Walking Dead and The Wolf Among Us and Jurassic Park, etc, also eschew a LOT of the traditional elements of a point-and-click adventure game. So the result is that there is a resurgence in the popularity of point-and-click style games, but there may be this new feeling that the Telltale style of point-and-click adventures is the template for how to do them, when actually it is a very recent experiment. So it may be the case that to some extent the popularity of the Telltale style point-and-click has either fundamentally altered people's expectations of what a point-and-click game should be like (especially people newer to the genre) or else made people kinda forget or "selectively remember" what those older games were like.

Read this classic Old Man Murray article describing one example of a classic adventure game puzzle's "solution", to get a sense of how much more obtuse the old point-and-click games used to be compared to Broken Age: http://www.oldmanmurray.com/features/78.html

Right around the time I started playing Broken Age, I was also playing the original Broken Sword, and man... that Old Man Murray article could not be more true.

In comparison to those old games, Broken Age's puzzles are challenging but make total sense once you think of them. Not to mention that Broken Age manages to give very good feedback and contextual hints, whereas in old school point-and-click games you got pretty much nothing.

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I don't share serjay's opinion but I understand what he is saying. But I will agree with the others that the type and difficulty of the puzzles isn't more hardcore than classic adventure games.

Those games were sometimes cruel! You had to spend a lot of time to travel back and forth (thank god at least for the double click change scene feature), some puzzles were insane (non-native English speakers would certainly scratch their heads until one day they learned what a monkey-wrench is) and you could often get stuck for days. I remember re-replaying DOTT almost immediately after finishing it, and many puzzles would still give me headaches.

I found the puzzles fair and as difficult as they should. It is true that the difficulty rose a bit suddenly, but many backers (including me) asked for this, exactly because it is something we like from the classics. I was even happy to take out my notepad for some puzzles, including the wiring of the robots.

What I believe serjay mostly did not like was the story. And if you don't like the story of and adventure game you probably end up hating it. I can fully understand this. I believe that Tim needed more time and less pressure to complete the story. Even though I believe it could be better, I liked it.

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