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Finished Broken Age? Discuss here! (Including Spoilers)

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I just finished the game: the puzzles were awesome in act 2! Everything was great, but I feel that it finished suddenly. What happen with the grandma'? And with the bad guys?

I think that Broken Age is a great gaming experience, and maybe I just wanted more =).

Thanks Tim and DF team!

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Just finished the game and loved it.

The quirky world kept me going when I was frustrated from some of the puzzles (like the snake one),, really enjoyed the jokes. One small criticism is that I wish there was some kind of virtual notebook so I didn't need a real notepad... and thus killing more trees... in all seriousness it just made my desk a bit messy.

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Just finished the game and loved it.

The quirky world kept me going when I was frustrated from some of the puzzles (like the snake one),, really enjoyed the jokes. One small criticism is that I wish there was some kind of virtual notebook so I didn't need a real notepad... and thus killing more trees... in all seriousness it just made my desk a bit messy.

I know it's wasteful, but I really appreciated that the game let me use my own initiative to keep track of stuff. Not everybody used paper, though. Some people took screenshots, and others wrote notes down in a text editor.

If you still have your notes, feel free to share them over in this thread :D

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Also, I think it's kind of funny and ironic this time around that I thought something was just fine and didn't bother me while KestrelPi (as well as many others) felt that that certain aspect was a little lacking. Just goes to show our priorities. Mine is more favoured to gameplay, yours seems to be story. :)

Actually, my deal isn't gameplay or story, but cohesiveness.

Something that's attractive about adventure games is that at their best, there's actually very little distinction between gameplay and story. Fate of Atlantis being a great example of how nearly every puzzle in your way in some sense advances the story, and of course in DOTT the time travel humour and the puzzles are intimately entwined.

Where adventure games begin to frustrate me is, usually, where those two elements aren't tightly bound enough - for example when nothing that I am doing in the puzzles advances my understanding of the characters or story, or when there's a puzzle which is out of step with the tone of the game or the motivations of the characters (something I thought The Longest Journey was guilty of a LOT).

My issue with Act 2 is that while it upped the difficulty of the puzzles considerably, they didn't seem to serve the story nearly so well as they did in the first half, and a lot of stuff felt underdeveloped in the second half's story as a result. I still enjoyed it, in many ways more than Act 1, but I do feel like the game as a whole lost a bit of cohesion.

As for adventure puzzles in general, when I think about what I like in puzzles it's not necessarily to do with difficulty (by their nature,adventure game puzzles are hard to tune for difficulty) so a puzzle I enjoy might be easy or hard, but it has to be in -some- way satisfying. So I enjoyed the grog jailbreak puzzle in Monkey Island, and swapping the hammers in DOTT, and lots of other stuff mainly on a mechanical level. I just thought as actions they were satisfying to perform. In BA I enjoyed both Act 1 and Act 2 versions of the head size puzzles, and in Act 1 I enjoyed the escape into space and some other stuff I can't remember off the top of my head. In act 2 I enjoyed figuring out the snake, and some of the wiring stuff, the knot puzzle, and so on and so forth. All these puzzles of varying difficulty, but what they had in common is that I find them satisfying to perform, mechanically.

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I guess THAT'S the different point then. I don't need the puzzles to have much to do with the story or characters. I just don't care about the story as much. It's gotta be there, and I'm not so removed from it that I ascribe to Romero's viewpoint (that video games are like porn, they have a story but don't need one), but if I cared about stories so much I'd read a book, and I don't read books, so...that answers that. Of course, I really enjoy games like Myst as well, the puzzles of which most people say are "logic-only" and have nothing to do with story, which I would challenge. Especially in Riven. Yet at the same time there is SO much reading in those games as well. Interesting. But my focus has always been gameplay. The puzzles. All in all personally, whether they're fun or not has nothing to do with their relation to the story or characters. Even frustrating puzzles when solved provide me with satisfaction afterwards.

Sometimes puzzles need a level of frustration so the payoff will be greater. It's when they have lackluster endings for all the work I went through (however enjoyable before or after I finished them) that I get annoyed sometimes. What I definitely CAN'T stand, though, is thinking something is going to be a nice big event in the game (because of the way the story is going, no less) and then finding the path to get there incredibly fast and not difficult at all. Too easy!

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What a great experience. I have loved the Broken Age ride since the day I signed up for the kickstarter right through to today when I finally got around to finishing the game (as a result of watching episode 20) I'm not sure where I sit on the spectrum of gamers. I've played them for over 20 years since I had a BBC micro system but I always got frustrated with adventure games. When you were stuck back then, you were stuck and there was sod all you could do about it. Now the internet is a great resource that makes games like these so much more accessible. You can puzzle over something for as long as you feel comfortable and enjoy doing so, but there is always a fall back.

The story is, for me anyway, usually the most important aspect of any game. Puzzles and action are certainly not secondary (otherwise I could just watch a movie) but when they are executed in such a was as to help you interact with a story, but not feel like they get in the way, then they really make an excellent and complete experience. I loved the Broken Age story - truly fun and engaging with great characters and dialogue.

Broken Age Act 1 was probably judged just perfectly for me and I loved every minute of it. I think I only resorted to the internet once. Act 2 was way above my puzzle solving level but with web support I still enjoyed playing it.

All in all guy, well done and thank you so much. Worth every penny, and some more actually. If only I'd known early on how great the game and the documentary were going to be, then I would have pledged more!

Thank you for opening up the process and letting us see how it's done. Just a shame that the "internet" didn't necessarily view it in the adventure spirit that some of us did. I presume none of the Loud People have ever been involved with, or tried to run, a project themselves. If they had, I'm sure they'd have been more understanding.

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