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Finished Broken Age? Discuss here! (Including Spoilers)

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So... The events at the end of the game roughly fulfilled the Druid's Battle of Vulgentol prophesy. I don't recall hearing the word "Vulgentol" anywhere in Act 2, though. Or is it supposed to be a "Gemethys"-type joke that's just going over my head for some reason?

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I think the Battle of Vulgentol dialogue happens in act 1 when you're talking to the Druids as Vella. It was never repeated again in act 2 though.

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Yeah, it was only mentioned in Act 1. I was just curious if the word itself was supposed to mean something, since most of the Druids' other beliefs were explained as miscommunications and misunderstandings.

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Just finished my third play-through. First one was to enjoy the game. Second to get familiar with all the puzzles, so I could get "Let's get this good time over with" achievement (finish game under an hour) on my 3rd play-through. I got 59 minutes :).

Now I'll maybe try to hunt for all these places to lose Cpt. Spoon and use Grabbin' Gary.

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Yeah, it was only mentioned in Act 1. I was just curious if the word itself was supposed to mean something, since most of the Druids' other beliefs were explained as miscommunications and misunderstandings.

That's true, yeah. I wonder if it has relations to any other names in the game... I'd have do another play through to figure it out. It doesn't mean much with the spelling reversed, and it's not an anagram of any real words either.

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So... The events at the end of the game roughly fulfilled the Druid's Battle of Vulgentol prophesy. I don't recall hearing the word "Vulgentol" anywhere in Act 2, though. Or is it supposed to be a "Gemethys"-type joke that's just going over my head for some reason?

I could be completely off base but as a made up word, it could actually be translated via etymology.

So Vulgentol would be a PLACE whose names literally means Elemental Plane of the Masses Of People That Are Not Us.

(so maybe... WE are Vulgentol... the battle is US solving the games puzzles.)

Like I said... maybe off base... but that's what breaking down parses of the word gave me.

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So... The events at the end of the game roughly fulfilled the Druid's Battle of Vulgentol prophesy. I don't recall hearing the word "Vulgentol" anywhere in Act 2, though. Or is it supposed to be a "Gemethys"-type joke that's just going over my head for some reason?

I could be completely off base but as a made up word, it could actually be translated via etymology.

So Vulgentol would be a PLACE whose names literally means Elemental Plane of the Masses Of People That Are Not Us.

(so maybe... WE are Vulgentol... the battle is US solving the games puzzles.)

Like I said... maybe off base... but that's what breaking down parses of the word gave me.

How are you parsing the word? What roots are applying? Presumably the Latinate "vulg-" referring to the common people. And then what, the Germanic "tal," meaning "valley"? If you're picking roots from multiple different language branches, the possible meanings are pretty endless.

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The story just kinda falls apart a bit for me in part 2. The whole explanation of why people are being taken just seemed nonsensical, Marek and the thrush (really?) goals are never particularly well established outside of big exposition dumps (nothing is really shown of what happens) and they just don't end up interesting as villains. There are puzzles that the characters have no reasonable way to solve on their own which just leaves huge plot holes. As someone said above, the idea of Vella learning that Shay had a snake hugging toy leading to the player learning something about him that he would already know was cool. What wasn't cool is both of them magically solving things they have no other means of solving. So story wise are they supposed to have just solved them through trial and error? What if it had taken hours and by that time it's too late? The ending puzzle can be partly explained as they both see the effects the other is causing, and work out what to do from there. Even then though it's still shaky, as it needs to be co-ordinated in a way that they wouldn't be possibly able to do. Maybe if the laser glowed red when powered so Vella can see when she's able to fire.

The whole intuition thing and Shay having some connection or something to Vella also goes absolutely nowhere too, outside of a puzzle solving excuse. The ending cut scene is poorly staged and choreographed. One minute they're all on top of the ship, Shay falls down, then the ships fall and they're all together again? The way that sequence cuts makes it kinda confusing to watch. There's very little sense of where they all are in relation to each other.

The game really ends up feeling like it was too big for its budget, as has seemingly been the case since day 1. Expanding out into the city for Vella to see more of what happens to the abducted people and why would have helped for example, and given more time to establish Marek and that other guy as more interesting villains. And Vella's grandma sudden reveal as a villain too or something? What was that? And how did the maidens escape their enclosure?

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Thank you Double Fine! Just finished the game and the smile hasn't left my face yet. Loved how the puzzles towards the end connected the two sides of the story. What a wonderful way to finish this adventure - I'm so happy that I was able to back the project! Thank you for all of your hard work and congratulations!

And the surprised traffic cone... :D

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Finished the game and I have mixed feelings just like after Act I.

Interestingly though, the mixed feelings are exactly the other way around as after Act I!

While in Act I I praised the story and had an issue with the puzzle difficulty, in Act II I left disappointed with the story, while the puzzles tickled my itch for adventure just like I hoped.

I'm still reading through the threads though, and my opinion isn't fully formed yet. These are my first impressions loaded with emotions from just coming from finishing the game, so feel free to challenge them and point me in the right direction when I missed something important.

Art

The most praise in both acts goes to the entire Double Fine team and everyone that was involved though:

The game is so incredibly pretty and well animated. This has to be attributed to Bagel's style, and also to the engineering that went into making it look like an animated cartoon rather than a game. This is definitely one of the most polished games that I have every played when it comes to these aspects.

Same for the music.

Voices

I have only good things to say about the voice acting. In particular I'm impressed by the German voices. I replayed Act I with the German voices and I was blown away by how good they turned out. Probably the best German voices I have ever heard in any (adventure) game, and that even without any big names (sorry if I should know all these people, but who cares they were awesome). I was surprised by how close to the originals many of the voices sounded, especially the German version of Marek. You could tell me that the English VA is bilingual and I would believe it.

Puzzles

The puzzles have been much much better in Act II compared to Act I. Thank you! Since there already exists an entire thread for good puzzles, I'll just write about those that I didn't like:

1) The hive mind puzzles. Expecting the player to assume that looking at stuff as Vella gives knowledge to Shay and vice versa just didn't work with my logic. It didn't feel consistent with the world, it was not required in Act I and then suddenly I have to look at a combination in Vella's space ship so I know how to wire the Hexpal as Shay? That came out of nowhere and felt like a way to force players to switch back and forth. But ok, the explanation is apparently that the player is some sort of shared telepathic link between the two as mentioned before in this thread, so I can accept the type of puzzle, but still, the execution of it gives the player no hint at all that this is even an option to consider. If I am supposed to switch, make a puzzle that actually affects something in the other character's world or something. It only occurred to me to switch to Vella when Shay said "I wish I was in my ship right now so I could look it up" or something to that effect, followed by me exclaiming "TIIIIIIIIIIIIIIM!!!" in front of my screen.

2) Putting a hexagonal shape into a square hole. I got trained as a baby that that does not work. Looking at the hole makes Alex say that it's a charging station for his Diamond Droids, so I guess it's fair, and I just forgot to look at that particular thing. Still putting this here because it's the only thing I needed help with.

3) There were some puzzles that I solved just because they were there, but otherwise wouldn't have had any motivation to solve them, but they turned out (of course) to be crucial to puzzles I did know about. I think that has always been that way though, and is expected of an adventure player to just solve what can be solved to see what clicks together in the end. I could swear there were some actual reverse-puzzles in this act too, but I can't think of any right now.

4) The hand holding with the shoe puzzle. It may be a nut to crack for some, but getting presented with a grid chart just because you answered the question wrong the first time feels insulting. In particular that the individual clues are already written down on the paper for you. Luckily I already knew how to get the solution at that point so it didn't affect me much, but I was still surprised that I'd get that slapped into my face that quickly, especially because the question comes unexpectedly and is pretty much impossible to answer correctly right from the get-go unless you have photographic memory or something.

Still overall, when it comes to the puzzles, they gave me just what I wanted: long moments of getting stuck, moments of ranting about how Tim can be such a dick, moments of joy when I finally figured it out, followed by moments of saying "sorry Tim, the puzzle was actually good and it was my fault for not getting it right away, and you're not really a dick".

Story

Now for the story, I feel like the brilliant plot that was built up in Act I went down the drain in Act II in a way.

Suddenly Shay's parents are not computers and as has been already pointed out and discussed before, they just apparently locked themselves away in a room for YEARS making their own son think that they're computers? I just can't suspend my disbelief on this. There was absolutely no explanation given for this, and you couldn't even really ask for it, besides one time or something where it's just hand waved. I just wanted any plausible explanation, like a disease or anything. Any real parent would have shown some reaction to their kid saying "I don't believe that you exist and you're just machines." It would have been so easy to just walk out that door for 5 minutes to demonstrate that they're real. But they chose not to and there was absolutely no reason given for this at all and it took me totally out of the game's story every time I thought of it.

Reading this thread I found out some good explanations for parts of the plot that weren't clear enough for me and a lot of other plot holes have been discussed already, so I'm not going to repeat them. Overall the story just didn't feel as brilliant as Act I's setup promised it to be. :(

Anyway, bottom line I enjoyed Act II, was disappointed with where the story went, but I really enjoyed the puzzles. So, with both parts having awesome art and VA, but one lacking the puzzles and the other lacking the story, that gives like, 2/3 of a great game, and 1/3 of a good one, I guess.

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(Sorry for my bad English.)

I just finished the game.

Thank you so much for this masterpiece DoubleFine.

I'm a little bit ashamed to admit it but I cried a lot at the end to be frank.

I was expecting to see this last shot. Even though, I thought it was beautiful. Simple but profoundly meaningful.

It has been such an adventure...

It's very touching to know that me and a lot of other people contributed to that.

So, yes, again, thank you (and sorry for being cheesy).

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There's a big plot hole.

How Shay ended up thinking his parents are the computers and why or how his parents didn't realize that? Especially since they took a group photo.

Act I lines like "Man, the computers are stupid" and more indicate that it was not just a nickname.

One of my theories was that the parents are really just humans communicating through the monitors and using the ship's systems but I didn't guess that there is no any explanation how Shay forgot that they are humans.

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There's a big plot hole.

How Shay ended up thinking his parents are the computers and why or how his parents didn't realize that? Especially since they took a group photo.

Act I lines like "Man, the computers are stupid" and more indicate that it was not just a nickname.

One of my theories was that the parents are really just humans communicating through the monitors and using the ship's systems but I didn't guess that there is no any explanation how Shay forgot that they are humans.

I remember there was something about "SPLARGH therapy". At the time I assumed that Marek's people had brainwashed him to completely separate him from his family, and thus increasing his "intuition" in "rescuing" other creatures.

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Act 2 was great! It was much longer than act 1, and the puzzles were more complex.

I got stuck in two spots of note:

I started with Vella, and got to the point where I needed to give the weaver a pattern to move the ship, but there was a pattern nowhere to be found. I poked around forever before I found out that the answer was on Shay's side of the story. It would have been nice if the game hinted me that I was done with Vella (for now), and needed to hop over there. In act 1, it was possible to complete one whole side, and then the other, so I was not expecting this.

On Shay's side, I knew I needed to dislodge the whistle from the mayor's throat but could not figure out how. I visited the snake, but figured it was pointless, because in act 1, you'd just blow the tuba and be fine. It's quite counter-intuitive to let a snake strangle you on purpose.

Overall, the game is excellent and was worth the wait. Well done.

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Absolutely loved the game!! Took my slow time to get through it over three days, It hit a perfect difficulty level in my book. Got stuck a number of times but only so Id have an idea of something to try when next playing, or when switching back to that character. great creative puzzles. never felt the frustration or need to look online for hints. felt really smart when finally solving stuff. such great design! great pacing. Went back between shay and vella uncountable times (vs no times in act I). and its a perfect length, ie pretty long! Id play more if there was more but super satisfied.

You guys truly made a real adventure classic! awesome! buying it again on iphone. and again for my wife.

and yes, this;

There's a big plot hole.

How Shay ended up thinking his parents are the computers and why or how his parents didn't realize that? Especially since they took a group photo.

Act I lines like "Man, the computers are stupid" and more indicate that it was not just a nickname.

One of my theories was that the parents are really just humans communicating through the monitors and using the ship's systems but I didn't guess that there is no any explanation how Shay forgot that they are humans.

Or why. Its a bit strange to have such loving and worrying parents just forgetting to meet their kid. Or are there references to a reason that he needs to be isolated after a certain age or event? is that part of the program? It feels like it could be but dont remember any references to it.

And I didnt really get the exact reason of the whole project dandelion...although I like that its a bit vague. these coneheaded guys have lost (/gotten rid of) their humanity (including sexual stuff) but still needs it? Before act II I thought itd be more straight up that itd be some isolated inbred royal house that needed mates without interacting with the outside world. maybe its kept vaguer than that to keep it lighter?

also dont understand the details of why marek had to sneak in and sleep in his costume (especially if hes some high rank) if that part is just part of their plan - it makes sense that its to appeal to a rebelling teenager whos seen through the usual mechanics of being brought up, and thats cool, but...? if the parents are also fooled by the whole space mission thing why keep the rescues and everything from them really? did marek personally have to oversee the rescues without the parents recognizing him?

but anyways, the greatness of the story and themes on the big level more than makes up for any small holes. And its a pretty Adventure Time-y world anyways. loved loved loved all of it.

except. only thing I didnt like was the pipe puzzle at the start of vellas story. or rather the interface for it. just didnt get how it worked with connecting the long pipe. tiny detail.

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Hooray, I just finished it! I liked it quite a bit, and definitely enjoyed Act II more than Act I. Not to say that I didn't enjoy Act I, I had a great time and of course the art and music were lovely!

One of my main issues with Act I was a general feeling (to me) of inconsistency with the world. I feel like while it's super cool that they incorporated backer ideas, maybe it wasn't necessarily the best for a cohesive environment and could sometimes feel like a random mishmash. While a game like Grim Fandango definitely had crazy stuff (demons! cat race tracks!) it still felt like a world with understandable 'rules' that I could imagine being in- which was something I didn't feel when first playing Broken Age. (Is the tree magic? Why is this modern hipster dude here? Are these living knitted dolls or robots? What kind of world is this?) Act II helped with some of this feeling for me by switching the characters into each others' environments. It was just nice to get a new perspective, and to have a little more opportunity to ask some questions about things.

The puzzle difficulty was also much better (again, for me) in Act II. I have a few friends who hadn't previously played any adventure games who were pretty challenged by the Act I puzzles, but I felt like I went right through almost all of them. This one had me good and stuck a few times, and actually made me leave to go eat/think for a while/go to bed, before coming back and finally cracking it. Funnily enough the only puzzle that had me totally stumped in both acts were the two puzzles with the peach as a solution, which I stupidly somehow forgot to pick up BOTH times. Oops. (Thanks Double Fine hint line!) Everything else, while it may have taken a little while, I was eventually able to work out and get that nice satisfying feeling of "YES, I AM THE SMARTEST."

Overall I had such a wonderful time with the game, and particularly with the documentary episodes! I'm happy to have the game out so I can play it, but a little sad to see the entire experience come to an end. I'm for sure going to give the game another playthrough from beginning to end (this time I only picked up again at the beginning of Act II) and see anything I may have missed. :)

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i very rarely post here. i decided to start posting more frequently now becasue i found this game to be amazing, and i felt i needed to say it out loud.

i've been enyoing the doc for a couple of years now (i backed the kickstarter back in 2012) and i loved every bit of this fantastic journey, with all its highs and lows. it's sad to see that there's so many people that are against double fine nowadays, considering how dedicated, hardworking and awesome most of you guys seem to be. i finished act 2 a couple of hours ago, and it was an amazing experience. it was a little bit more challenging (which i welcomed, as act 1 to me was a little on the easy side.. but i loved it anyway) but not super hard to the point that i had to resort to a walkthrough or some kind of hint guide. just challenging enough!

it was perfect, and it reminded me why i loved tim schafer's games so much. it felt just like when i was 10 years old and playing day of the tentacle, on my old windows 3.1 computer. i can't really say enough good things about this fantsatic game, so i'll just say... thank you double fine, thank you tim. best 15 bucks i've spent on a game, ever!

ps: i live in argentina, 15 dollars is actually a lot of money here :)

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Wonderful game, guys. Congratulations to the team!

When the art style was introduced, I was worried that it would have the resolution problems that were present in Puzzle Agent, also a game with soft-edged characters. In Puzzle Agent, you could really tell when art was being resized, but I looked for and did not notice any of those problems here. Great job! I ended up liking the muted palette as well. It really fit. Yes, it is a beautiful game.

The puzzles were great. In Act I, I did things like purposely not choosing the correct option so that the game would be longer. In Act II, I actually got legitimately stuck a few times. (NOTE: I was confused for a while on the shoes puzzle. I guessed randomly the first time, and the chart to fill out popped up. Vella suggested I fill it out, and I was stuck for a while trying to fill it out on-screen. I was trying to do that because Mom would not ask me for the puzzle answer any more. It turned out going through the transporter again fixed the problem, and Mom asked me again. I'm not sure if that is a bug or not because I had already increased Vella's head to max size and hadn't changed it back.) I liked the patch-making puzzle a lot because I got to use my math skillz (Sun Tzu's Remainder Theorem Ho!). I was really surprised that the thing with the hexipal and the mallet worked. Was that the only inventory combination puzzle, or am I forgetting some?

Some things that bothered me: why was the maiden feast organizer woman allowed to associate with the (people whom I will call on account of not remembering their names) Mog-builders after contact with residents of the bad lands when in Shay's case we are told that his contact with the residents has permanently contaminated him in their eyes? Also, Shay's revelation about his parents seemed...sudden. From what I remember, there was not any foreshadowing in Act I for Shay having grown up with human parents, which pushes Shay away from "surly teen" and towards "psychotic break" in my eyes. I did wish that Shay had a more heroic moment at the end as well. Sure, in Act I, he breaks convention and plays the "save the aliens" game, but this is heroism under false premises. Also, his act of defiance is equivalent to Vella's in Act I, but Vella gets to choose again again to be heroic in Act II while Shay just...starts treating his parents better. It is a very small heroism compared to feeding and eventually rescuing the captive maidens, blowing up the Mog Factory, beating up Marek, etc... On the other hand, it is nice to have a game with characters consistent and deep enough to analyze for a change. :) I absolutely adored the knife. I was in suspense for the entire credits until his fate was revealed.

Thanks also for the documentary (2PP!) and the blog posts from the team. I learned a lot about the process! I am sorry that the darker part of the internet was roiled up and decided to follow this project around for some reason. You should all be proud of the content produced here despite all that. It was a great game, a great documentary, and a great overall project.

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After playing Broken Age and watching the documentary series, it feels like I personally know everyone who worked on the game. I smiled when I read the credits, because I knew the people behind the names.

It was well worth baking at the $100 tier. I can't wait until my boxed copy arrives, but I wish there was more game to play.

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Act 2 puzzles were great, they had the complexity I missed in the first act. I thought I could do each others side in one go and then there would be another story crossing point for the end, like in act 1. I ended up brute forcing Vella's side of the story only to find all the missing clues (Mister Huggy and Weave pattern) when playing Shay's side of the story. I liked the fact that even when the quests had multiple substeps on them, they were very clear on what I had or find to complete them. If we forget me bruteforcing Vella's side, the most time I spent on trying to find the right way to distract Alex at the end.

I wish they revisit act 1 puzzles some day and add more complexity to them (like Megamonkey difficulty setting in Monkey Island -games)

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One of my main issues with Act I was a general feeling (to me) of inconsistency with the world. I feel like while it's super cool that they incorporated backer ideas, maybe it wasn't necessarily the best for a cohesive environment and could sometimes feel like a random mishmash. While a game like Grim Fandango definitely had crazy stuff (demons! cat race tracks!) it still felt like a world with understandable 'rules' that I could imagine being in- which was something I didn't feel when first playing Broken Age. (Is the tree magic? Why is this modern hipster dude here? Are these living knitted dolls or robots? What kind of world is this?)

In some ways, I agree! All of Tim's past games have some zany element to them, but they're very grounded in their own realities. Part of what helps support this is that they're all riffing on popular culture and recognisable motifs (film noir sensibilities or biker culture, or metal mythos or summer camp adventures, or college dorm shenanigans). If you take Broken Age as playing on the style and character of Bagel's art in the same way, then I think it fits, even if the world's rules are harder to predict and find consistency in.

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One of my main issues with Act I was a general feeling (to me) of inconsistency with the world. I feel like while it's super cool that they incorporated backer ideas, maybe it wasn't necessarily the best for a cohesive environment and could sometimes feel like a random mishmash. While a game like Grim Fandango definitely had crazy stuff (demons! cat race tracks!) it still felt like a world with understandable 'rules' that I could imagine being in- which was something I didn't feel when first playing Broken Age. (Is the tree magic? Why is this modern hipster dude here? Are these living knitted dolls or robots? What kind of world is this?)

In some ways, I agree! All of Tim's past games have some zany element to them, but they're very grounded in their own realities. Part of what helps support this is that they're all riffing on popular culture and recognisable motifs (film noir sensibilities or biker culture, or metal mythos or summer camp adventures, or college dorm shenanigans). If you take Broken Age as playing on the style and character of Bagel's art in the same way, then I think it fits, even if the world's rules are harder to predict and find consistency in.

Mm, maybe. I do think this is a legit criticism, though. One thing I think Tim is usually very very strong on is making the world seem a lot bigger than just the story and player characters inhabiting it, and I definitely got less of that feeling with Broken Age's world. There were all these loose ends that served the puzzle design and so forth but never felt like they were in the world for any other reason.

Like in Grim Fandango you come to the petrified forest and there there's a tree with a machine on it and you have to break it to improve your car, and if you ask it's explained the machine to suck the marrow out of trees, to make buildings with from the city you were just in, and it's just a little bit of detail that makes the world feel tended to, thought out to a degree.

In Broken Age the trees have recently started talking but this is never explored at all, the only relevance it has is in giving you a way to get some sap and deliver some tree-based humour. It feels like a situation contrived for the game. Which I think is why it also felt odd in Act 2 when people in that world started talking about TV shows and Video Games, because it didn't really... 'feel' like that sort of world. Contrastingly, I feel like after playing Full Throttle and Grim Fandango, I can imagine what the rest of those worlds might be like, even without having visited it all. They feel like real places.

This criticism mainly applies to the places Vella is in in Act 1. I think a much better job is done of establishing the tone and 'rules' of the spaceship. It has that much more cohesive yarn theme, and more of a structure to it (and I enjoyed the act 2 touch that different ships are themed differently).

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Mm, maybe. I do think this is a legit criticism, though.

Sure, and I don't have any objections to that criticism. I was offering a rationalisation for how it fits the pattern.

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That was one fantastic adventure! Took me two days to play from the beginning until the end O_O Phew!

I'm kinda proud that I didn't look for any hints and solved everything on my own : ) It wasn't always easy, some puzzles really took me some time to figure out. Now and then I felt kinda dumb for not finding some stuff until I walked around the place for 10 or more times checking all kinds of not so logical stuff. But I guess that is all part of this game genre xD The funny ways however how the game responded in many cases on my absurd actions made also these moments pretty enjoyable ^^

I must say I really loved the story, the look and feel and sound. They all allowed for that wonderland universe! All those animations and voices, just wow! So much effort went in to minimise the repetitiveness, keeping things alive, I really appreciated that. And of course the in depth 2P documentary gave this game even more dimensions. Thanks for all the inspiration all this time Double Fine, it was a great ride ^_^ Amazing job everybody!

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One of my main issues with Act I was a general feeling (to me) of inconsistency with the world. I feel like while it's super cool that they incorporated backer ideas, maybe it wasn't necessarily the best for a cohesive environment and could sometimes feel like a random mishmash. While a game like Grim Fandango definitely had crazy stuff (demons! cat race tracks!) it still felt like a world with understandable 'rules' that I could imagine being in- which was something I didn't feel when first playing Broken Age. (Is the tree magic? Why is this modern hipster dude here? Are these living knitted dolls or robots? What kind of world is this?)

In some ways, I agree! All of Tim's past games have some zany element to them, but they're very grounded in their own realities. Part of what helps support this is that they're all riffing on popular culture and recognisable motifs (film noir sensibilities or biker culture, or metal mythos or summer camp adventures, or college dorm shenanigans). If you take Broken Age as playing on the style and character of Bagel's art in the same way, then I think it fits, even if the world's rules are harder to predict and find consistency in.

Yeah totally! I think after Act 1 maybe I just needed a little more time in the world, which is why I felt a little better about it after Act 2. :)

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As a huge fan of adventure games, I enjoyed Broken Age.

I have some criticisms, but they are far outweighed by the overwhelming positives.

I thought the puzzles were designed in a classic, adventure-gamey way, even though I think a couple of them (lookin at you, spaceboots) were a little obnoxious and were just made harder for the sake of it. Once past the troubling puzzles though, they were soon forgotten and the frustration subsided.

I loved the art style, the animation and the voice acting. In fact, the entire game's production value was absolutely top quality. I can't speak for the code, but I didn't encounter a single bug throughout Act 2. I think I may have run into 1 during Act 1, but if I did, I can't remember it now.

The one thing that bothers me though, and this may sound slightly odd, is that Broken Age didn't feel like it fit in the same universe (for lack of a better word), as the old Lucas Arts adventure games it was inspired by.

I always felt that Monkey Island, DotT, Throttle, Grim, Sam n Max etc, existed in the same sort of universe (again, for lack of a better word), in the same sort of way Marvel has a huge universe.

Broken Age felt like a standalone story (albeit a very good one), and that's the only disappointment I had about it. I'm not saying I wanted cameos from old Lucas Arts games characters or anything, just that it didn't feel like one of those games.

Anyway, Broken Age was a roaring success, and I loved the documentary too. It's been nice to be able to follow development from start to finish.

Here's to more adeventure games in the future.

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I really, really enjoyed this game. It's not quite dethroning Psychonauts as my favorite Double Fine game though. The art, and puzzles were really great. I felt pretty clever solving the song nav puzzle, and the wiring puzzle at the end gave me a Fez vibe which I enjoyed a lot.

I wish they could have explained Shay's parents being human though. I really wasn't buying the explanation. I think putting in something explicit saying that they had to be separated or something would have made it more plausible. I didn't really mind them reusing the environment assets for act 2, but I would have liked at least one more new area. I realize though that it was kind of necessary to get the game done.

Overall though good job, and I hope you guys get a break.

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I think that the gender roles focus comes from someone at Double Fine stating it's the focus when it comes to the storyline.

I mean, since I didn't really follow the documentary that much while it was still being made, I didn't had idea of what they wanted the story focus to be, so I didn't see any "gender focus" in it that much.

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I haven't been involved here much since becoming a backer, but I want to make sure this got read by the DF team:

This game was great and I loved just about every second I spent with it.

I played most of act 1 and 2 on my living room television set and it was gorgeous. The puzzles for act 1 weren't hard, but still fun. Act 2 puzzles were fun AND pretty good brain food. The musical shifts for 1 and 2 sounded great. The voice work was incredible, especially for Vella act 2.

But my favorite part was the writing. hands down. Each DF/Tim game has a style of humor that is unique to it. Grim had a lot of dead pan(hah) gallows humor. Psychonauts had a lot of "zany" humor.

Broken Age nails whimsical humor. I laughed so much, and chuckled, and "aww'ed" at a ton of it.

I can't wait to play this again.

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