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crazyman

The best hint/clue in the entire game was... (mild puzzle spoiler)

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The burned out wires on the Hexipal.

1.) It required the player's attention but it wasn't obtuse. No character said "Hey, you should look at x to solve y" but neither was the clue hidden in the background to be easily missed by the player.

2.) It iterated on the player's previously picked up knowledge

3.) It fitted well into the world and story.

It was neither too obvious nor too abstract or ridiculous.

Whoever designed it deserves a lollipop.

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And then people who has not used to pre Jurassic Park - The Game / The Walking Dead puzzles complained how the puzzles in Act II are badly designed due they are too hard to solve. It conflicts their idea of story focused Act I.

Heck, even Jesse Cox made bizarre complain how puzzle took him 20 minutes to figure out like it was somehow a bad design due that.

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Are we talking about the way you had to get the last Hexipal wiring configuration? If we are, then yes, I absolutely enjoyed that one.

Very good design imo. You had to be observant as a player but it also employed a process of elimination and iteration (ie you had to fail at least once to get the idea), and you had to be patient.

If you just grabbed the safety Hexipal without paying attention to what it was doing then yeah, this would be a very frustrating puzzle, but it wouldn't be because it was badly designed.

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Yeah. It is unfortunate that Telltale's newer games have somewhat ruined traditional adventure games for people by giving them different expectations. I watched a Twitch stream the other day in which the player complained that the dialogue choices weren't meaningful because you could choose all of them.

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Interesting. My response to that puzzle was something like:

"Really? After making me *work* for all the configurations so far, you're just giving me this one? It can't be that simple. And... yes it is. Huh."

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Actually, I just noticed that hint after beating the game, on screenshots on the forum and whatnot.

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Yeah. It is unfortunate that Telltale's newer games have somewhat ruined traditional adventure games for people by giving them different expectations. I watched a Twitch stream the other day in which the player complained that the dialogue choices weren't meaningful because you could choose all of them.
It's more the case of Telltale catering to a different market, and people not realizing that the games are in different markets.

Before the Telltale style of play, a lot of people used to complain about how they didn't think point and click adventure games were fun to play all the time. Now, a lot of those same people are playing the Telltale games, and enjoying them because Telltale distilled the formula down to focus more on the story and choices and less on the puzzles (when there are any at all). These people now think that all modern point and click games should be like Telltale games, and either don't know that (or don't think that there should be) still games being made today that are more like the classic adventure games.

I think both styles of gameplay have their merits, and they both deserve to still co-exist, but I'm not sure there's much that can be done about people lumping their expectations for the what the game should be based on other similar games they've played on either Double Fine or Telltale (and there has certainly been a good share of that, for both companies). I really don't think that's a problem with Double Fine or Telltale's marketing either, as both have been pretty upfront that they're not the same type of game. Telltale has stated since The Walking Dead that their style of games are either cinematic adventures or, more recently, they've simply referred to them as story games, and Double Fine has always been upfront that Broken Age is more like a traditional adventure game.

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Interesting. My response to that puzzle was something like:

"Really? After making me *work* for all the configurations so far, you're just giving me this one? It can't be that simple. And... yes it is. Huh."

Same. It felt like a relief, I already did that puzzle twice, I didn't want to spend time on ANOTHER config, and there it was marked and eveything. Just took one fail to realize which colors went where.

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