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I love donairs.

(waiting for 80% of the world to go "what?")

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We call that Doner kebab

Also called Gyros in Greek.

You crazy americans have such weird names for food

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Yes, but in Canada(at least), it's mostly spiced beef. I also prefer the sweet sauce to the traditional tzatziki.

Halifax donairs for the win.

You crazy americans have such weird names for food

America mostly knows them as Gyros. Donair is mostly just Hungary and Canada from my understanding.

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We call that Doner kebab

Also called Gyros in Greek.

You crazy americans have such weird names for food

Actually we just mispronounce Gyro like mad.

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Good thing we don't have rats here. I think it would actually cost more to import kilograms of rat meat than to cut up a cow, which we have a lot of.

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I had a donair last week, It was awesome.

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this thread is the second search result for 'donair police' on google

Now the first. You're famous hot. Apparently only on Google Australia though.

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this thread is the second search result for 'donair police' on google

Now the first. You're famous hot.

It's even #6 without quotations. Amazing.

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It's first without quotes for me.

In Norway it's called döner kebab (with an umlaut).

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So in Norway do you have umlaut keys on your keyboard or what? How do you type such symbols? Alt codes?

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It's first without quotes for me.

In Norway it's called döner kebab (with an umlaut).

Maybe, but nobody ever uses the "döner" part, I would say!

So in Norway do you have umlaut keys on your keyboard or what? How do you type such symbols? Alt codes?

We do, actually:

?ACT=36&fid=21&aid=5173_JzdxduDQwHuoR3Ja5jUJ&board_id=1

Umlauts are not part of the Norwegian language, except for some foreign words. (But you can always use the Norwegian ø instead of the ö.)

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It's first without quotes for me.

In Norway it's called döner kebab (with an umlaut).

Maybe, but nobody ever uses the "döner" part, I would say!

Mostly not, but they do if they want to distinguish it from the shawarma kebab, which is also very popular in Norway. Plus, you'll see döner written on the menus in most places that serve it (that I've been to).

So in Norway do you have umlaut keys on your keyboard or what? How do you type such symbols? Alt codes?

We do, actually:

http://www.doublefine.com/?ACT=36&fid=21&aid=5173_JzdxduDQwHuoR3Ja5jUJ&board_id=1

But umlauts are not part of the Norwegian language, except for some foreign words. (But you can always use the Norwegian ø instead of the ö.)

My keyboards all have the tilde to the right of the umlaut on the same key, which means you only press that key once, followed by a letter to type a letter with an umlaut. Alternatively, a letter with an umlaut can be typed with Compose Key + Letter + '=', which I think is a more intuitive way to type it than using Alt codes. On Windows, compose key functionality requires installation of additional software though, as far as I know.

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I don't have an umlaut, but I have french keys. I keep it set to English and just use alt codes though. Keeps it simple that way(a couple keys are in different places with that setup).

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I don't have an umlaut, but I have french keys. I keep it set to English and just use alt codes though. Keeps it simple that way(a couple keys are in different places with that setup).

Why do you have French keys? Are you French Canadian?

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I don't have an umlaut, but I have french keys. I keep it set to English and just use alt codes though. Keeps it simple that way(a couple keys are in different places with that setup).

Why do you have French keys? Are you French Canadian?

Bi-lingual keyboards are pretty common in Canada. I took 6 years of French, but other than that, I'm pretty far from being French-Canadian. I live in the Tennessee of Canada. Just replace music with video game/software developers.

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I don't have an umlaut, but I have french keys. I keep it set to English and just use alt codes though. Keeps it simple that way(a couple keys are in different places with that setup).

Why do you have French keys? Are you French Canadian?

Bi-lingual keyboards are pretty common in Canada. I took 6 years of French, but other than that, I'm pretty far from being French-Canadian. I live in the Tennessee of Canada. Just replace music with video game/software developers.

Interesting, and pardon my ignorance, but I've always had the impression that the French and English parts of Canada are very separated culturally? I've met at least two separate French-Canadians who don't speak English at all, which I find pretty strange when you're a country where the large majority speaks English.

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Interesting, and pardon my ignorance, but I've always had the impression that the French and English parts of Canada are very separated culturally? I've met at least two separate French-Canadians who don't speak English at all, which I find pretty strange when you're a country where the large majority speaks English.

A portion of southern Quebec is strictly French, outside of that(especially the province), we're mostly English. Even there, it's really hard not to find kids that speak English these days in Canada. It's common to take at least 1 year of French in school though, it is our second official language.

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