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Spaff

Day of the Tentacle Remastered at Indiecade!

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That could be because it was a CM-32L sound.

LucasArts tended to use the extra features of a Roland sound unit (MT-32 or CM-32L, etc.). This would explain "missing" sounds if you're not listening using one of those.

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That could be because it was a CM-32L sound.

LucasArts tended to use the extra features of a Roland sound unit (MT-32 or CM-32L, etc.). This would explain "missing" sounds if you're not listening using one of those.

I've never heard that one either. Anyone got a video of that maybe?

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One thing you definitely SHOULDN'T change is the punching sound effect when Dr. Fred turns on the lights in the lab during the intro. That's too funny! :D

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You can hear the birds tweeting in this video playing DOTT with a CM-32L:

The author of the video turned off all digital sounds, so the sounds you hear are entirely produced by the MIDI unit (no dialogue, no other sound effects) -- and there are bird tweets.

This proves that DOTT was designed to take advantage of the extra sound effects produced by the CM-32L/CM-64 MIDI units. I hope DF are aware of this!

(Here's a video showing the difference between MT-32 and CM-32L and the extra sound effects you miss:

It doesn't have DOTT, but it has other games so you can hear the difference.)

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Vocal gibberish.... vocal gibberish? Are we still talking about the same game? xD I can't remember anything like that in the game...

They are from Purple Tentacle's transformation at the start of the game.

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They are from Purple Tentacle's transformation at the start of the game.

You mean that kinda... "Awablabla" sound when he wiggles around right before the big roar?

But I could've SWORN I've heard that being used in other games or cartoons or whatever.

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Thanks for the update, Paul! :)

One thing you definitely SHOULDN'T change is the punching sound effect when Dr. Fred turns on the lights in the lab during the intro. That's too funny! :D

I second this.

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Edit: You can hear the birds tweeting in this video playing DOTT with a CM-32L:

And when it coughs it sounds like a car slamming the brakes. xD

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The trouble with any sort of uprezzing is that pixellated graphics automatically look grittier without trying, so if you simply attempt to up-res them then the risk is that you end up with a naively smoothed out version of the originals.

A little trick to fake a bit more detail is by just adding some texture to the image (open the image in a new tab to see it at full size):

6Qa5raT.jpg

It also helps making this look a bit more like traditional animation... just make it an option in the menu. Now if they manage to roughen up the line-work as well...

I second Laserschwert's idea. :-)

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A little trick to fake a bit more detail is by just adding some texture to the image

I second Laserschwert's idea. :-)

I also support this.

Hope you don't mind, Laserschwert, but I just tried putting the untextured character sprites onto your textured background:

Remastered-Characters-on-Textured-Background-day-of-the-tentacle-38986241-1920-1080.png

Remastered-Characters-on-Textured-Background-Close-Up-day-of-the-tentacle-38986242-670-547.png

Just to give an idea of what the characters would look like on Chuck Jones-esque textured backgrounds.

To me, it gives the impression that the characters are drawn on cels, and I like that. :)

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To me, it gives the impression that the characters are drawn on cels, and I like that. :)
Yeah, I like that even more, good idea! Now give them a slight drop shadow as well :D

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To me, it gives the impression that the characters are drawn on cels, and I like that. :)
Yeah, I like that even more, good idea! Now give them a slight drop shadow as well :D

Shadows would certainly help make them look as if they are actually in the environment. Actually just lighting in general.

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I think by "drop shadow" Laserschwert meant to add a faint, blurred shadow on the character outlines. Like how drawings on real cels in traditional animation look when they're placed onto a backdrop. It's a nice way to make digitally-produced frame-by-frame animation look completely traditional. :)

I agree about the lighting! The original game (like a lot of LucasArts classics) does have lighting in areas (e.g. when a character walks into a shaded area, they go a little darker) so hopefully they'll put those in the remaster too.

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No fames have been added. There was an attempt made to add frames but it looked dreadful.

Be careful what you wish for! :)

I'm trying to figure out why this would be the case, but I just can't. Our brains are used to seeing high-res cartoons in 24 or 30fps. Anything less looks inadequate. If you grew up in the 90s, you got used to seeing lower fps on pixel graphics, and that's why I think it seems fine to us. DOTT's animation is probably between 5 and 10 fps. (This is also why games like Metal Slug, that do 30fps on pixel graphics, seem so mind-blowingly good). How could adding frames to get closer to cartoon quality be bad?

The intuitive strategy would be to use the 5-10 frames per second you have as key frames, and add tween frames. But you also need to account for the fact that animation is often a little jerky with sudden movements, so you can't just interpolate evenly between frames. Anyway, I'd love to hear from one of your animation guys why adding frames didn't work.

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A little trick to fake a bit more detail is by just adding some texture to the image

I second Laserschwert's idea. :-)

I also support this.

Hope you don't mind, Laserschwert, but I just tried putting the untextured character sprites onto your textured background:

Remastered-Characters-on-Textured-Background-day-of-the-tentacle-38986241-1920-1080.png

Just to give an idea of what the characters would look like on Chuck Jones-esque textured backgrounds.

To me, it gives the impression that the characters are drawn on cels, and I like that. :)

This is amazing and SO much better! This is what our brains have been conditioned to see as 'proper' cartoons: very clean characters over a distinct background that's usually more detailed. I agree with whoever said that little circular shadows would also make them look more 'in the scene'.

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No fames have been added. There was an attempt made to add frames but it looked dreadful.

Be careful what you wish for! :)

I'm trying to figure out why this would be the case, but I just can't. Our brains are used to seeing high-res cartoons in 24 or 30fps. Anything less looks inadequate. If you grew up in the 90s, you got used to seeing lower fps on pixel graphics, and that's why I think it seems fine to us. DOTT's animation is probably between 5 and 10 fps. (This is also why games like Metal Slug, that do 30fps on pixel graphics, seem so mind-blowingly good). How could adding frames to get closer to cartoon quality be bad?

The intuitive strategy would be to use the 5-10 frames per second you have as key frames, and add tween frames. But you also need to account for the fact that animation is often a little jerky with sudden movements, so you can't just interpolate evenly between frames. Anyway, I'd love to hear from one of your animation guys why adding frames didn't work.

Actually, I believe that most old school animation was done at 12 fps

The original animation in DOTT is definitely nowhere near 5ps (at least for special animations - or I don't know, maybe me eyes are playing tricks). 10-12 would be much closer as an estimate (maybe?). Look at the animation when Bernard climbs into the clock toward the start.

But you're probably right that on the whole it's lower. But 24 FPS is definitely not the target here.

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This is amazing and SO much better! This is what our brains have been conditioned to see as 'proper' cartoons: very clean characters over a distinct background that's usually more detailed. I agree with whoever said that little circular shadows would also make them look more 'in the scene'.

That last one might not work as well as you think. I've been looking at the floor and the characters, and it's pretty clear that they haven't been consistent in the angle of the floor, instead opting for prettier looking scenes. So, for example here

bfeet.PNG

Bernard's feet if you look closely don't really sit flat on the ground.

I wonder if adding a shadow wouldn't make these inconsistencies more obvious because it would be a bit like standing him on a semi-transparent plate, which itself wouldn't always look aligned with the floor.

But it could work. Worth a go.

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Actually, I believe that most old school animation was done at 12 fps

Indeed:

Actually hand-drawing 24 unique frames per second ("1's") is costly. Even in big budget films, usually hand-draw animation is done shooting on "2's" (one hand-drawn frame is shown twice, so only 12 unique frames per second)[10] and some animation is even drawn on "4's" (one hand-drawn frame is shown four times, so only six unique frames per second).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frame_rate#Digital_video_and_television

The source of the citation is sadly offline now.

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I have some traditional animation experience. Adding extra drawings requires timing and spacing knowledge to make it look good. Simply in-betweening what is already available would look horrible.

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TV cartoons are still animated on twos today, for the most part (when animating frame-by-frame - tweening is a whole other story). You only really need to draw at 24 fps for short, quick actions. Animating on ones for the whole thing (especially in a particularly exaggerated style) can just look messy and too busy.

Computer games usually animate at 60 fps - or at a number that's a factor of 60. I'm not sure but I think DOTT could be animated at about 10 fps? Only guessing though.

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Actually, I believe that most old school animation was done at 12 fps

Indeed:

Actually hand-drawing 24 unique frames per second ("1's") is costly. Even in big budget films, usually hand-draw animation is done shooting on "2's" (one hand-drawn frame is shown twice, so only 12 unique frames per second)[10] and some animation is even drawn on "4's" (one hand-drawn frame is shown four times, so only six unique frames per second).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frame_rate#Digital_video_and_television

The source of the citation is sadly offline now.

Good to know. So the FPS in DOTT is more like between 1 and 5. I quickly opened up ScummVM and tried to count Bernard's animation frames as he walked. I got around 4 per second (very rough, obviously). I then grabbed the flier at the bottom, and the whole animation is about 2 frames, giving around 1 fps. These animations are really abrupt for comic effect, so I get that trying to add frames would be difficult.

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I have some traditional animation experience. Adding extra drawings requires timing and spacing knowledge to make it look good. Simply in-betweening what is already available would look horrible.

Makes sense. Too bad.

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They've already said they tried adding extra frames and it looked terrible (although they added extra frames to MI2:SE and it looked fine, but I guess DOTT is different).

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(although they added extra frames to MI2:SE and it looked fine, but I guess DOTT is different).

The animations in MI2:SE that did have more frames looked good but (and I know I've said this already elsewhere) what bothered me was that it was inconsistent. Some were really smooth and some were still only a few frames long. It's like the game couldn't decide how it wanted to look.

So yeah, since we can't expect them to make all animations in the game more smooth I'd prefer it if they keep them all the way they were.

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Spaff, could you please confirm whether there is (or ever was) any physical "final background art" for the original game? That is, did Peter Chan paint the final backgrounds which were then scanned in (and perhaps retouched) a la Monkey Island 2, or were the final backgrounds done on computer? Making Of articles are quite ambiguous when discussing this!

Thanks!

I'm fairly certain that all the DOTT backgrounds were made digitally, unlike MI2 which i believe was based on scanned paintings.

We have some concept art, and we are going to include a concept art gallery like Grim has. We're also going on a mission next week to the Lucas archives to see if we can find even more than we already have. :)

Howdy!

Some quick clarification: we talked with Peter Chan for a bit while doing this project and got some background on how he arrived at the look for the original. The backgrounds were done traditionally before being scanned and cleaned up for the game (not unlike MI2).

Additionally, we worked closely with Peter on getting the look right for the remaster and while there certainly were numerous different ways we could have reinterpreted the artwork, we decided to try and stick close to the geometric shapes and paper cut-out look of the original designs that were inspired by Maurice Noble.

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Thanks Tucker! :)

So I was wrong - having never seen or heard of the original artwork for this game, i'm really excited that it might exist somewhere.

We're raiding the Lucas archives on Friday, so fingers crossed that we find them!

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Thanks Tucker! :)

So I was wrong - having never seen or heard of the original artwork for this game, i'm really excited that it might exist somewhere.

We're raiding the Lucas archives on Friday, so fingers crossed that we find them!

I'll keep all my fingers and toes crossed! :D

Would be really cool if you could find the original art of the intro scene since there was apparently an unused portion that you never got to see, further on the right of the screen. If so, you can include that as a bonus behind the scenes thing.

bigdottvid6.jpg

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