EMarley

Psychonauts 2 in the media

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In response to misleading headlines like this one, here's a response by Fig, Fig CEO Says No Delays in SEC Process. Everything on Track for Psychonauts 2. The article links to an older one which I'm too sick right now to begin to try to understand, someone else explain pls: http://www.crowdfundinsider.com/2015/12/79131-game-crowdfunding-platform-fig-publishing-launching-reg-a-offer-to-raise-15-million/

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In response to misleading headlines like this one, here's a response by Fig, Fig CEO Says No Delays in SEC Process. Everything on Track for Psychonauts 2. The article links to an older one which I'm too sick right now to begin to try to understand, someone else explain pls: http://www.crowdfundinsider.com/2015/12/79131-game-crowdfunding-platform-fig-publishing-launching-reg-a-offer-to-raise-15-million/

And how many sites will report the correction, I wonder.... hmmm.... *places money on zero*

*edit*

PS: Get well soon, Emarley.

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Thanks, Anemone. Feeling better now, but my voice is still gone.

An article has been published about the making of Psychonauts written by Chris Schilling in Edge magazne, issue #290 March 2016. Tim Schafer re-tells the story that was also covered in the 2PP documentary. One thing they're going to do differently with Psychonauts 2 based on their experience with the first one is to work first on establishing and animating Raz, and then build the environments based on that. And like has already been said, they're aiming for a scope in the ballpark of the first game (which was 11 levels and two hub areas).

But the most important part was the first line of the article: "Double Fine founder and CEO, Tim Schafer, is a happy man."

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"Zak McClendon, who oversaw the development of Rock Band 4, BioShock 2, and The Bureau: XCOM Declassified, is now the lead designer on Psychonauts 2."

Hmm. A history of producing average to moderately decent sequels. Please don't mess this up, Zak! :-/

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"Zak McClendon, who oversaw the development of Rock Band 4, BioShock 2, and The Bureau: XCOM Declassified, is now the lead designer on Psychonauts 2."

Hmm. A history of producing average to moderately decent sequels. Please don't mess this up, Zak! :-/

Bioshock 2 gameplay > Bioshock 1 gameplay, IMHO

I think he also did Minerva's Den, which was pretty much universally praised.

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i think Steve Gaynor was the lead on Minerva's Den..?

They both worked on both of them, but the official credits are very generic as far as what they both did. They are both usually listed as just "2K Marin". On IMDB Steve Gaynor is listed as the director of Minerva's Den, but that's not the same thing as the lead designer. Mcclendon was apparently the lead designer of Bioshock 2, but IMDB lists Jordan Thomas as the director.

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All the content of this post has now been added to the first post since I'm not running up against a character limit anymore, so I don't have to split the masterpost.

Edited by EMarley

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I guess we're derailing the thread here (maybe a mod should move the posts to the random thread)

OK. I just moved the discussion about Google and Dreamworks and Pixar out to the Everybody Get Random Thread. Feel free to continue the conversation there. :)

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Kotaku audio interview with Tim is mainly about the relationship between devs and journalists and DOTT, but also touches on Psychonauts 2.

A making-of Psychonauts interview appeared in the magazine Retro Game Issue 162, it only mentions the sequel being crowdfunded, doesn't say anything else about it. But I had to share this quintessential quote from Tim:

"As soon as we were going into people's brains, I wanted to have secrets. And people purposely build these kind of little packets – like owl pellets; how owls eat mice, but the small bones of the mice are going to cut them from the inside, so they wrap them in this soft, velvety thing so that they can digest them. And then the owl barfs it out. It's like you have this emotional pellet in your brain, which are these really painful memories that you just wrap in this soft, gauzy bed of lies and it sits like that in your brain so that you don't have to think about it anymore. In the game, you'd be cracking those open."

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Kotaku audio interview with Tim is mainly about the relationship between devs and journalists and DOTT, but also touches on Psychonauts 2.

A making-of Psychonauts interview appeared in the magazine Retro Game Issue 162, it only mentions the sequel being crowdfunded, doesn't say anything else about it. But I had to share this quintessential quote from Tim:

"As soon as we were going into people's brains, I wanted to have secrets. And people purposely build these kind of little packets – like owl pellets; how owls eat mice, but the small bones of the mice are going to cut them from the inside, so they wrap them in this soft, velvety thing so that they can digest them. And then the owl barfs it out. It's like you have this emotional pellet in your brain, which are these really painful memories that you just wrap in this soft, gauzy bed of lies and it sits like that in your brain so that you don't have to think about it anymore. In the game, you'd be cracking those open."

That was such an uncomfortable interview. The "whiney teenagery" (I forget his name, and that's how he jokingly refers to himself at the end) writer for Kotaku came across incredibly immature. He seems to take his job SO seriously, but at the same time couldn't grasp basic concepts like *not exaggerating*. He seems completely unaware of his action when he asks Tim "how do you feel after backstabbing Kickstarter?".

He seems to think asking such questions are his job as a "journalist" (I use that term loosely -- they're closer to professional bloggers to me), and that he's servicing his readers by writing such headlines that reflect that lazy use of language. (You can just imagine one: "Tim Shafer backstabs Kickstarter" instead of "Tim Schafer helps found new crowd-funding platform".)

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A couple of tangential things:

Tim Schafer will be giving a masterclass in Paris on May 2nd. It should become available on their youtube channel.

James Willems and co. did a cute

video for the game's birthday. First time I'd ever heard about the ostrich.

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A couple of tangential things:

Tim Schafer will be giving a masterclass in Paris on May 2nd. It should become available on their youtube channel.

James Willems and co. did a cute

video for the game's birthday. First time I'd ever heard about the ostrich.

I remember Tim talking about the ostrich!!! But I don't remember where!

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First known line of dialogue we may see in RoR or P2:

Raz: [mildly interested] Hm. (highlight to read)

This is AWFUL, such a BETRAYAL OF CHARACTER Raz would never say that, Tim Schafer is ruining my childhood. I want my money back.

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The video of Tim's french masterclass hasn't been uploaded yet, but French newspaper Le Monde interviewed him. This is a translation (mine and google's, so feel free to point out any mistakes) of the part where he talks about Psychonauts:

When Grim Fandango was released in 1998, it was a game that made ​​innovative use of what was then very new technology, 3D. Today you are working on a game in virtual reality in the world of Psychonauts. Does this new technology change the way you work?

For this game, we started with a completely new concept, even if the action is set in the world of Psychonauts. It will be a bit more like an adventure game, with puzzles. The hero, Raz, is in a fixed location, but you can control the environment through pyrokinesis and telekinesis. In particular, Raz is clairvoyant, he can take on the point of view of other characters. The technology is really neat: you can create complex environments without worrying about the risk that the player will get lost. You can have, for example, trees that don't block the view of the camera!

We are in the early stages. When Grim Fandango was released, 3D technology was almost magical. You could see objects from both sides! And if you moved the camera a little, you could even see the top! At the moment, virtual reality has somewhat the same effect, you say, "Wow! it really looks like that character is looking at me right in the eyes!" It's very strange. One says: "I can't believe I'm under water! I can't believe that these objects are moving around me! I can't believe I'm this nauseous! "

Virtual reality has its pros and cons as a technology, but it's something that really makes you want to use it. One just must be sure to have, in the end, a game that's fun, with an authentic setting, humor, and good characters, and not simply one to play for the sake of the novelty.

It seems to create levels of Psychonauts, which are based on phobias, you have created for years a document in which you record all the amusing obsessions or astonishing phobias of the people you meet...

That is true. By mixing them, I find ideas for new levels. In total, I have a good thirty. If you do some research on psychological disorders on the internet you can find tons of things - but some of these pathologies are much too sad to be used in a game. The idea is certainly not to make fun of people who have serious problems. Our approach is that of a cartoon.

Is there anything on this list that you feel yourself?

Of course - when you learn about these pathologies, you end up feeling some yourself. Obsessive compulsive disorders, for example: when I was little, I spent my time checking that there wasn't a monster in the closet of my bedroom ...

At college, I studied the psychology of dreams. There are several theories about the meaning of dreams; I was influenced by the theories of Carl Jung, his ideas about archetypes and the unconscious, the way that that archetypes in the unconscious pass into the conscious domain when you're ready. When you become a parent, for example: the archetypes of the mother and father pass into your consciousness and take power. I really felt when I became a father, as if a button had been pushed somewhere in my brain. This is something that would be really interesting in a level in Psychonauts!

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This is from waaaaay back (well, couple months) and I don't know if it was already posted, but Tim did this podcast with Kotaku. I only just sampled the beginning, but it seems pretty interesting!

https://simplecast.com/s/593bc6c6

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This is from waaaaay back (well, couple months) and I don't know if it was already posted, but Tim did this podcast with Kotaku. I only just sampled the beginning, but it seems pretty interesting!

https://simplecast.com/s/593bc6c6

Yep, that was this thing in case you want a link to the article about it:

Kotaku audio interview with Tim is mainly about the relationship between devs and journalists and DOTT, but also touches on Psychonauts 2.

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