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Liviu B.

I demand art-related answers from art-related people.

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I've always wanted to be able to ask this, eversince I first laid eyes on the first Psychonaut screenshots - where do you fine artists draw inspiration from? And I don't mean just favorite artists - I mean those artists you wanted to draw like eversince forever, have an altar of in your cupboard and involuntarily, uhm, emulate. Of course everybody's got his own style, but I'm really, really interested what got you drawing the way you did - what cartoons for example. Everybody seems to mention Tim Burton, ok, got that, any others? Is there a modern american cartoon movement I'm not aware of and everybody's laughing at me? :) I mean, that warm fuzzy feeling you get seeing, other than Psychonauts, Day of the Tentacle art for example. Well, if anybody had the time to answer, it'd be great. If not, forum members are invited to enlighten me, with the condition they know what the heck they're saying :). Thanks.

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To hell with Tim Burton, if I hear anyone compare things to Tim Burton again I will make it my personal mission to murder the man so he can't do anything ever again. So, yes, I've had stuff compared to his 'style' and it has always enraged me. As for the starting of things? Think back to the pre-school and grade school art classes everyone took. What did they have you doing? Drawing pictures of your family, dumb seasonally themed projects, the very basics of color, etc. That's where it frequently starts; your interpretation of color, what your family members look like, what kind of seasonal weather you have.

I've had my parents shoving historical art books down my throat since the begining of time immemorial, and watching shows on pbs like Sister Wendy the art nun. I thought she was hillarious; drew my first parody of her, which my parents thought was marvelous (in retrospect she's quite cool and the nick name 'Sister Dorky' was inappropriate, I do not regret my decision to depict her incessant yakking as the reason Vincent Van Gogh cut off his ear though).

To the meat of your question: Marc Chagall, Edward Gorey, Leonardo (shut up), Bosch (since 3rd grade), Egyptian tomb paintings, the Thorne rooms, James and the Giant Peach (kicked Nightmare's ass), Norm Scott (most recently), Oddworld, Disney (when you're young there's something undeniably appealing about their smooth, bland character forms), my mother, aboriginal works, Tomb Raider (original), Terry Gilliam (Brazil especially, damn, I was way too young to see that when I did).

There's plenty more, but what I'd really like to point out is alot of stuff is influenced by non-visual mediums like novels and music and radio that force you reach into every corner of your mind to craft images of what's goind on, and voices for the characters.

Of course, looking at all this, I'm rather embarassed. I have basically zero actual artistic training, and so I think someone who does could probably put this more sussinctly. Dammit, and now I'm late for an appointment. Curse my long winded, pointless ravings.

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I don't really have any artists I find myself emulating when I draw or paint or anything visual, but when I write, I always find myself coming back to a very Douglas Adams-esque style.

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I'm really, really interested what got you drawing the way you did - what cartoons for example.
I like the works of Walt Disney, Tex Avery, Chuck Jones, and William Hanna & Joseph Barbera in terms of animated characters. Moreso, Tex Avery and Chuck Jones of those that I have mentioned because of the quality and humor that they created with their characters.

I also find that life experiences from your childhood, music, and everyday inspirations contribute greatly to someones personal outlet of creativity. I'd imagine that when you can combine your creative outlets with others who are also aspiring to achieve a common goal, that you can get something that is even more rewarding than just your own personal work. I'd like to imagine that those working on Psychonauts, as artists, would agree that colaborating ideas and your work with others found more inspiration and more ideas than what just one person had because of different personal experiences and different points of view on how to create that universe for the game. I'm just guessing here, as an ordinary poster, though.

It would be nice if they included some sort of "The Making Of" bonus disc with the next Double Fine game because I am sure that it would be neat to see the process and what things may have inspired the directions they decided to take in creating their game. If one of the fine Double Fine folks are reading this, please do a "The Making Of" disc for this next title!

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Excellent. I must admit I've never heard of Edward gorey before you mentioned him, I'm going to be looking into his stuff. And yes I was initially going to sk about Disney but then I thought, what living cartoon/game related artist isn't in someway inspired by Disney - unnecessary question. And I can definitely see how Bosch fits into the picture.

I thought about asking because this happened - a friend who is totally computers/games ignorant came into my room while I was playing and, after quietly watching a custscene, went something like "whaddaya know, 3d expressionism" - and then I thought about how game graphics, cartoons and comics are looked down upon by the artistic l337 (at least around here), and how easily something like you guys' work or other valuable interactive stuff that's out there proves them wrong.

Yeah, I know, you get that all the time. Now go wake Tim up, I wanna ask if games are art :)

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My art style wasn't really inspired from anything too much. I just went along with what I felt like, not liking any main art style too much. (Besides, alot of things now are in an anime style which is making it seem highly over rated. *waits in a defensive curle to be beaten*).

Mainly, my art style is highly cartoony. My first inspiration was Garfeild and then over time transformed into something that looks nothing like the sort of art in that comic.

And then Psychonauts came and actually changed my art stlye somewhat. What it mainly did was effect the eyes slightly, and now the character's I draw, have an appearance that fits their personality to an extent.

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yeah..uh.. I might've confused you guys, I was refering to Double Fine's artists' art, lol. But we can have a separate art thread, I'll start it soon if no one does ahead of me.

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I don't really have any artists I find myself emulating when I draw or paint or anything visual, but when I write, I always find myself coming back to a very Douglas Adams-esque style.

In no way a bad thing. DNA is my favourite writer of all time.

By the way if you were a fan of BBC 'Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy' radio plays or just the Dirk Gently novels this may interest you

http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/dirkgently/

I am too afraid to say anything about art in case I get verbally attacked by people who actually know, or at least think they know something about it.

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I don't really have any artists I find myself emulating when I draw or paint or anything visual, but when I write, I always find myself coming back to a very Douglas Adams-esque style.

In no way a bad thing. DNA is my favourite writer of all time.

By the way if you were a fan of BBC 'Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy' radio plays or just the Dirk Gently novels this may interest you

http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/dirkgently/

I am too afraid to say anything about art in case I get verbally attacked by people who actually know, or at least think they know something about it.

Not to completely derail the topic or anything - it's not like we completely missed the point anyways - but that is the most wonderful news I've heard in quite some time. Now the only question is, when can I hear it in the US?

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*cracks paws* Alright, it you wanna hear my personal inspiration then here goes. I get my inspiration from two things:

1) Friends. Both online and IRL. All the ideas that we could come up with, the RL experiences, and the fact that most of my friends are also artists that draw in some way or another. They're really the reason I draw; not just for my own personal happiness, but to make others that I know around me happy.

2) Music. I have many mixed tastes, and the ideas and images that one song can give are enough to go and draw it out. Heck, one of my original characters, Blue, was based off of Eiffel 65's song, "I'm Blue" and Michael Jackson's "Beat It", and many of my pictures were based on songs.

That's pretty much where I get my inspirations from. Friends and music. *nodnod* :3

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Not to completely derail the topic or anything - it's not like we completely missed the point anyways - but that is the most wonderful news I've heard in quite some time. Now the only question is, when can I hear it in the US?

Wellllll you have a number of options

When the BBC aired the Tertiary, Quandary and Quintessential phases of the HHG2TG (that's radio adaptations of the last 3 hitchhiker books, Life the Universe and Everything, So Long and Thanks For All the Fish and Mostly Harmless) the BBC made them available to be heard on-line on the BBC website. Each episode could be streamed from the site for a week after it aired. That's how I heard it here in Australia. Hopefully they will do that again. Just keep an eye on it.

If they don't you may be able to download it somewhere... not that I condone that, it's just an option is all.

Or worst case senario you'll have to wait till the BBC release it on CD and buy it over the net or something.

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I am too afraid to say anything about art in case I get verbally attacked by people who actually know, or at least think they know something about it.

I notice that you say they "think" they know something. Well, bs, don't listen to them. Everyone is unique andhas their own way to draw or work on it.

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hen drawing from life, I am ever present with the model, because to me, I am doing more than just drawing lines that resemble what I see. I am capturing their essence and personality on paper. their tension and relaxation. their attitude. their... being according to me. that moment will not ever come by again, so I am desperately holding onto it.

Humans are creations of their experiences. whether it's experienced through someone else's eyes (reading a fantasy book, seeing a video of the first moon walk, listening to old people talk about the war), it becomes your own experience. and I choose to draw on these experiences and mix them up as I see fit.

so when I draw a environment, I think about everything i can see and feel in that place and draw it as if i was sitting in it. same applies for characters. I imagine them with personality. how they would talk. what they would say if they were talking to me. how they would walk. what they would wear. i picture that person in my mind's eye, then I draw that gesture as though it was a model sitting in front of me. then add all of the pretty details.

rinse. repeat.

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I am too afraid to say anything about art in case I get verbally attacked by people who actually know, or at least think they know something about it.

you gotta have a backbone and an opinion, and fiercely defend it. or no one will take you seriously. maybe any nay-sayers will learn something from the way you work

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I am too afraid to say anything about art in case I get verbally attacked by people who actually know, or at least think they know something about it.

you gotta have a backbone and an opinion, and fiercely defend it. or no one will take you seriously. maybe any nay-sayers will learn something from the way you work

Holy quote failure, Batman.

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you gotta have a backbone and an opinion, and fiercely defend it. or no one will take you seriously. maybe any nay-sayers will learn something from the way you work

You'll never catch me and my opinion alive!

* dives out nearest window, never to be seen again *

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you gotta have a backbone and an opinion, and fiercely defend it. or no one will take you seriously. maybe any nay-sayers will learn something from the way you work

You'll never catch me and my opinion alive!

* dives out nearest window, never to be seen again *

Quickly! Catch him!

EDIT: Wait, what's wrong with these quote boxes?!

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you gotta have a backbone and an opinion, and fiercely defend it. or no one will take you seriously. maybe any nay-sayers will learn something from the way you work

When people say you've got a stick up your arse it's fun and productive to answer "I tend to call that my backbone."

(if you ever confront me with this remark in the near future when I've moved on because it wasn't that funny I'll deny ever having said it)

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Wahahaha, you want to hear the truth?

I draw my cartoons the way I do because way back when (in the fourth grade or so) I couldn't draw very well at all, but that didn't stop me from making character designs for myself and my friends.

At the time I could really draw puppies, or panadas, or other such things I was obsessed with at the time, but I didn't have much experience with drawing people, so my humans took on the basic animal shapes I knew how to draw.

Even today... they still look like... they just might... have muzzles.

Below: Doodle self-portrait out of my OneNote. :S

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Good thread going on here!

As I've already mentioned before at the games of yore section in some topic, stuff that really inspired and still inspires me are the works I've seen during many childhood like experiences.. for which to me the most amazing ones of those actually came exclusively in the form of (by now classic) adventure games like Day of the Tentacle ( Peter Chan? ), Sam & Max (Steve Purcell + Peter Chan), Heart of Darkness, Toonstruck and the Neverhood. The man behind the Neverhood (which is the same man who also created the likes of Earhworm Jim and many more) is called Doug TenNapel and still is of great inspiration to me today. I'll also never forget the imaginative world of Commander Keen. I know, that's even older.

I do know Bill Tiller ( check this out! ) is another sublime source of inspiration for me (and probably -un-awarely also for a bunch of other creative buggers round here) and as somebody else already mentioned before too.. the Oddworld galaxy ( for example shaped along with by Raymond Swanland ) did their fair amounts of creative impacts on my brain.

Well.. that's my personal influentual story in a really tiny nutshell. Hope that answered your question! If not, let me know!

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I love your links gardenofeyes. They make me all warm inside.

On my wall I have framed copies of the first issues all the cheesy 1990's comics starring game characters. Mario, Sonic, Zelda. The best is the Gameboy comic, in which a gameboy short circuits and the game comes into the real world. AMAZINGLY BAD. I read these and I'm instantly 9 years old again.

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Sounds like a very classic clash-up storyline to me :lol: Don't ever tuck those posters away out of sight Pixelton.

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