Tiny Dust!

The Double Fine Group Of Doubly Fine Writings

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Here's one that probably won't get randomly erased from the forum.

Edited by Tiny Dust!

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I was hoping for "Double Fine Group of Fine Writings Deux: Electric Boogaloo," but whateva.

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20 minutes ago, Noname215 said:

I was hoping for "Double Fine Group of Fine Writings Deux: Electric Boogaloo," but whateva.

There was one of those previously. That's also missing :b

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We've talked an awful lot about writing novels or screenplays and briefly the subjects of short stories and poetry, what about television style episodic scripts or a stage play?

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I've actually considered writing in serial format. As I tend to come up with ideas that lend themselves to more long-term storytelling. I've also considered writing comics for a similar advantage.

I've started to move away from that kind of thing though, I have enough problems finishing a standard screenplay or novel. I'm not sure I could sustain a serial to the end of a project's run. Soar has been serial on and off throughout it's various existences, but I've about decided to do a single self-contained story (with the potential for sequels) just so I can have it done and move on. I'm to the point now where Soar and Fair & Everett are my only projects. And this was not the case in the past. But those two stories have their hooks in me, there's something in both of them that I have to express before I can move on.

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I haven't tried writing television, but I do have a list of sit-com ideas gleaned from personal threads on neogaf. Some of them are so ridiculous they're almost unbelievable.

I think my favorite one is this guy with a foreign roommate and he comes home to a half-eaten can of cat food on the kitchen counter. They don't own a cat. Hijinks ensue as the guy tries to awkwardly confront the roommate about the fact that he might have accidentally eaten cat food.

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Most of the serial ideas I have tend to be grounded in the crime genre. With the exception of one comedy about a group of nerds who decide to pull a heist to acquire a terabyte of unpublished novels from the safe of a recently deceased fantasy writer while LARPing through everyday life.

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Most of the time, I just think about writing episodes for existing television shows.

Mainly Doctor Who. 

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Although I should finish the first one before anything else, I have the ghost of an idea for a sequel to Eye of the Orient flashing forward from 1918 to 1922 where three characters from the first one (Oliver Baldwin, Tom Fletcher, Barney MacTavish) find themselves on another hunt after one of Oliver's warbuddies is killed in New York City over a letter alluding to the location of a Tang Dynasty era treasure trove somewhere in China and the four men who made a pact to find it, two of whom have been murdered. 

I would be mixing a pulp adventure with a Kung fu movie. 

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I've always wanted to write something that plays off of themes from my own Catholic faith, like Scorsese did with Silence or Blatty did with The Exorcist.

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It's up there, I can't disagree. But my idea, whatever it may be, would probably try to juxtapose both guilt and redemption. Those are the two I find to be the most compelling. But then you have the theme of faith in and of itself, which is prevalent in those two movies I mentioned.

Then again, I'm just speculating because I got enough on my plate as it is before I go on with anything like this. 

Edited by Noname215

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That's another thing Tolkien had over Lewis.

Edited by Noname215

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It's interesting considering the place of faith and religion in fiction as a non-religious individual.

My work tends to lack intentional religious themes or subtext. And often I don't have overt references to religion either. My worlds tend to be largely atheistic I guess.

When I delve into philosophical themes about the point of it all I tend to stomp around human exceptionalism or nihilistic optimism.

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Biblical themes tend to lend themselves pretty well to fiction. Like with the use of Christ figures. For example, Andy Dufresne in The Shawshank Redemption, or Superman.

Regarding using references to religion in my own work, it's for the most part sparingly (you can't not refer to Islam when dealing with an Arabian princess or not refer to Buddhism when a main character is a Shaolin monk) but when I do use Biblical themes I try to hide them like J.R.R. Tolkien. I use parallels to the book of Jonah in A Man Who Walks Eternity and to the story of David and Bathsheba in Five Empty Coffins. But the best novel outside of anything set in Middle-Earth or Narnia I believe to have ever used biblical themes was John Steinbeck's East of Eden.

Edited by Noname215

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It helps that Catholicism is a theme close to my own life and experiences. And writers love pulling stuff from their own lives. Like Stephen King and all his references to alcoholism, drug abuse, car accidents, his childhood. I myself come from a family mostly made up of cops, former cops, military men and former military men so one of these days I'm gonna pull from that.

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I like having lots of gods and have them be guys you don't wanna piss off or get noticed by. Not worshipping any god is more of a survival strategy than a theological difference.

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9 hours ago, Alcoremortis said:

I like having lots of gods and have them be guys you don't wanna piss off or get noticed by. Not worshipping any god is more of a survival strategy than a theological difference.

You mean along the lines of Greek/Roman style polytheism or H.P. Lovecraft Old Ones?

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Kinda... both?

There are Roman/Egyptian gods... and also Old Ones. And some are Roman/Egyptian gods reimagined as Old Ones.

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The worlds I come up with tend to stick to one God unless dictated otherwise (The Eight Laws). 

Anyway, I haven't worked on The Troop for over four weeks and I feel bad about it.

Edited by Noname215

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I tend to find that polytheistic worlds tend to have more interesting philosophical debates. Like, if you have a world where gods are proven fact, then it changes the debate from whether they're real or not to whether they're worth worshipping or not. And if so, which ones?

And then Planescape has the neat concept where it doesn't matter which god you worship as long as you worship *a* god and you are judged based on what that god finds important. So if you're evil and worship an evil god, you get the afterlife that god gives devout worshippers (if you worship a demon, then you get hell... but you get to be one of the demons in hell). But if you don't worship any gods, you end up in the Wall of the Faithless, which is this giant wall of tortured souls who eventually are ground into nothing.

Atheists... tend to try to become immortal in the Planescape setting.

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There was one thing I remembered trying to plot out back in high school which would have been a post-apocalyptic rendering of Percival and his quest for the Holy Grail which would have been half gunmetal and grit thriller and half theological meditation. But then I discovered The Book of Eli and dumped it.

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