Recommended Posts

Well, I like cowboys well enough, though I don't really like the classic "riding off into the sunset" version. I'm more of a spaghetti western or post-apocalyptic sort of person.

I like long shots of desert.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah I meant cowboys.

I love westerns. However I prefer western movies over prose westerns, despite my great respect for the incomparable Louis L'Amour and Elmore Leonard. I think it'sΒ got something to do with visuals, because come on, you can't confine all the cinematic splendor of westerns into prose. Also,Β I've no preference when it comes to what exact type of western I like, be it between a John Ford/Howard Hawks typeΒ or a Sergio Leone. And when it comes toΒ riding off into the sunset/distance, they do that in spaghetti westerns, too. Every movie in the Dollars trilogy did it.

This western I've been working on is a Sam Peckinpah type western with an injection of themes from film noir like The Killing and Chinatown.

Edited by Noname215

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some writers can manage it, but yeah it is a more cinematic genre.

It's hard to make two guys staring at each other for twenty minutes interesting on paper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, Alcoremortis said:

Some writers can manage it, but yeah it is a more cinematic genre.

It's hard to make two guys staring at each other for twenty minutes interesting on paper.

Disagree, it's just how you're using that "time" to your advantage.

In film, you'd use the actual time as two men stare each other down, ready to draw on each other at a moment's notice to build suspense in the audience.

In prose, you have the opportunity to use that moment to explore the psychology of the character(s). What's on their mind, how are they mentally preparing for what comes next, how do they feel? You can't get inside a character's head like that on film.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the actor is good, I'd say you can get in their head pretty well.Β 

I have very little doubt in my mind what Blondie, Angeleyes, or Tuco were thinking at the end of The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly, for example.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Alcoremortis said:

If the actor is good, I'd say you can get in their head pretty well.Β 

I have very little doubt in my mind what Blondie, Angeleyes, or Tuco were thinking at the end of The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly, for example.

True, but that's more informed. It's subtext, in prose, it can be actual text.

I'm just making the point that there's strengths and weaknesses to both the visual and the text based mediums. And while you can never quite convey via text the pure splendor of information imparted to you via seeing it. Text can get into the intangibles and cerebral aspects of fiction in a way that visual media cannot capture.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think one genre that can be equally effective both cinematically and in prose is horror. In that sense things I read have a tendency to stay with me more than things I watch, unless the thing I watch is very effective.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the best written horror is the shortest. Like the two sentence horror stories I find to be the creepiest and the ones that stick with me longest. Longer form horror tends to dull as I read it and acclimate to the situation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Escapism mostly. Putting yourself in the shoes of someone who's stronger, smarter, and luckier than you and doing cool stuff, going to exotic places. If you can imagine yourself as the hero, it's almost empowering by proxy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Alcoremortis said:

Escapism mostly. Putting yourself in the shoes of someone who's stronger, smarter, and luckier than you and doing cool stuff, going to exotic places. If you can imagine yourself as the hero, it's almost empowering by proxy.

Most of pulp adventures have a tendencyΒ to apply toΒ a male demographic, so I'm curious: are there any existing examples of pulp type stories where the main character is female?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anything other than that? I'm looking for examples that aren't reallyΒ obvious.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, it took me awhile, but I remembered the series I used to read as a kid. Vesper Holly!

51VeG21yg2L._SX300_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg51yKYkCJwsL._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg51+wI5NhlBL._SX298_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

They were great. I gotta reread these.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sometimes if the covers are really good, you can at least judge that the author and/or publishers at least have good taste. XP

But yeah, I'm pretty sure these covers played some part in me reading the entire series. They were all good fun. I made a point of picking up as many female-lead books as I could, particularly when I was a preteen.Β 

It... did lead to me reading some pretty racy stuff from the dollar section of the used bookstore. Like Heroine of the World. I thought it would be a fun adventure romp, but it was an altogether different sort of romp.Β 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

UntilΒ The Eight Laws,Β I don't think I ever seriously considered writing anything female centric.

Then I discovered theΒ Onna-bugeisha.

Edited by Noname215

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Noname215 said:

UntilΒ The Eight Laws,Β I don't think I ever seriously considered writing anything female centric.

Then I discovered theΒ Onna-bugeisha.

Why not? I mean, I think I know why. Because I'm the same way with male protagonists. When I have the idea, the lead usually springs to mind with it, at least in some form. And usually the lead is female.Β 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pretty much everything I write ends up being female centric or robot centric, but I think that's largely because I feel really guilty if I write yet another book with a male protagonist when I could write one with a female protagonist.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Tiny Dust! said:

Why not? I mean, I think I know why. Because I'm the same way with male protagonists. When I have the idea, the lead usually springs to mind with it, at least in some form. And usually the lead is female.Β 

Because any time I thought 'Maybe...' I'd shut myself down because the accompanying idea 9 times out of 10 was garbage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Tiny Dust! said:

Why's that?

It's sort of a contrast when you consider a typical female role. That and male villains are a dime a dozen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, what I've got going right now is a matriarchy that started because originally the family head was decided by male contenders dueling each other and one generation literally all of them died fighting each other. The two eldest women thought about dueling it out for superiority and then were just like "nah" and became co-matriarchs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I currently have two projects in mind where there's both a female hero and a female villain, but in one of them the hero'sΒ gotΒ an antihero roguish streak and the villain is secondary toΒ the main villain, a corrupt British admiral.

Edited by Noname215

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now