Tiny Dust!

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57 minutes ago, Noname215 said:

How about ghosts?

Ghosts are more universal I think, they'll never go out of style, and there's a lot of ways you can use them.

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I've been coming up with some Elder God names for my story thing. Right now I'm at:
 

Nur-seti

Zhuphath

Milotep

L’notugua

Yog Anuksha (or maybe Xan Anuksha, not sure if Yog is too overused now)

Belathok

 

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I've always loved ancient Egypt. Just such a cool culture and I wish it showed up in more stuff.

Of course, this means I gotta brush up on my Middle Egyptian. I used to have a working knowledge of hieroglyphics, but now I can only remember a few. And the word for "house", "pr".

Though, this won't be real history, so I'm gently changing a lot of things. Different names for loads of stuff, more might change as I figure things out. I'm going by the original name for Egypt at the moment, Kemet.

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I've decided to take a break on The Troop to do more work on The Nightmare Man. A friend of mine has a creepypasta channel on YouTube and he's looking for stuff to use as content so I'm gonna throw him a freebie.

This means a page one rewrite, because I was very unsatisfied with my initial 68 page draft.

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One of the things I keep finding the most difficult to settle on is the history behind the eponymous Nightmare Man. 

My first go around it was a toy maker who also pilfered little girls from their homes, placing their skin on mannequins to create dolls before disposing of the bodies in a well behind his house. When the authorities found him out and came to get him, a mob got there first and castrated him with a brick before burning him to death.

The second one had similarities. This time it was a former city surgeon whose wife had her uteri damaged in a car accident. He then kidnapped young women and would remove their uteri in his barn, but always failed to properly remove them and usually found himself having to simply ditch the bodies in the woods surrounding town. This time a passing motorists a few dozen feet from the doctor's house managed to see the doctor dragging a body behind his house and alerted the cops. Like the first one, an angry mob took him from the police and slaughtered him in the woods.

Also, never could figure out whether or not I wanted the guy to have some sort of occult connection. I always figured when it came to ghost stories it's either about some sort of grevious wrong done to a person, or the good old fashioned calling to Old Scratch. Unless it was one of those 'died in an act of extreme violence' like with Ju-On or Ringu.

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Since The Troop is a horror movie with a predominantly male cast, I'm thinking of ways to do one with a predominantly female cast, only with more of a psychological edge or a sense of humor (Ginger Snaps, The Craft) than anything like the visceral body horror of The Troop.

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Psychological horror with female characters works very well because there's a strong culture of dismissing the genuine feelings and emotions of women as imaginary. So horror that builds on that tends to strike a chord with viewers. And even more so if you have teenage girls or children, whose reactions are even less regarded.

Kinda like Gaslight, a movie I haven't seen but still find concept to be pretty chilling.

Also, I think I'm seeing IT on Friday, which should be pretty fun. I never watched the miniseries or the book, so I have no idea what to expect except possibly jumpscares and clowns.

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3 minutes ago, Alcoremortis said:

Psychological horror with female characters works very well because there's a strong culture of dismissing the genuine feelings and emotions of women as imaginary. So horror that builds on that tends to strike a chord with viewers. And even more so if you have teenage girls or children, whose reactions are even less regarded.

Kinda like Gaslight, a movie I haven't seen but still find concept to be pretty chilling.

Also, I think I'm seeing IT on Friday, which should be pretty fun. I never watched the miniseries or the book, so I have no idea what to expect except possibly jumpscares and clowns.

Yes and yes, but so so so much more. IT moved me.

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The novel has so many layers. It's a gory horror story, a romance, a psychological drama, and a coming of age. A true masterpiece and my second favorite Stephen King novel, just behind Salem's Lot.

The miniseries was only able to capture as much as a television show would allow, but aside from Tim Curry it does not really hold up.

The movie is everything that I hoped for and then some. Not like the disappointment that was The Dark Tower. It managed to capture every emotion I felt while reading King's novel, and when the second part comes out I am confident it will hold up to the first.

Edited by Noname215

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Promising. Despite my love of horror concepts, I'm actually not much of a horror person, if that makes any sense. I like coming up with disturbing stuff and writing it, but not so much watching it. There's of course a few exceptions to this rule like Alien, Get Out, Cabin in the Woods, Evil Dead 2 and so forth. And I think I liked those because none of them were *just* horror, they had humor or cool scifi stuff or whatever for me to focus on and the horror aspect was built into that. I don't like being subjected to an endless ream of jumpscares and gore because being momentarily startled is just not fun for me and I volunteered in a pathology lab for two summers so disassembled bodies don't really do it for me either. 

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It's actually not very gory. There is one scene that might bring to mind Evil Dead 2, but at the same time compared to a lot of modern horror movies it's actually pretty tame in that department.

But one thing I always appreciate is when a horror movie builds up dread before unleashing a scare, rather than faking you out with a cheap BOO or have someone bump into someone or (I hate this one so damn much) if it's one of those 'Just a prank, bro!' scares. The scares in IT are earned. But it's not just a jumpscare movie, either.

Edited by Noname215

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Al don't read this until you've seen the movie:

Spoiler

I think my favorite scare in the movie might have been the one in the garage. Because it builds and builds on the dread of the moment before going full tilt with a jump scare that then moves into claustrophobic and pressing terror. I don't really get scared by horror movies, but the tension of that scene had me gripping the handles of my chair.

 

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Al don't read this either. 

My favorite scene is with Beverly in the bathroom, which is more metaphorical than just blood and hair in a drain. I think it captured perfectly how Pennywise uses her fear of burgeoning womanhood, a fear she conquers through a very shall we say unorthodox method in the novel, and on top of that, gotta love me some blood fountain.

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10 minutes ago, Noname215 said:

Al don't read this either. 

 

  Hide contents

My favorite scene is with Beverly in the bathroom, which is more metaphorical than just blood and hair in a drain. I think it captured perfectly how Pennywise uses her fear of burgeoning womanhood, a fear she conquers through a very shall we say unorthodox method in the novel, and on top of that, gotta love me some blood fountain.

 

Spoiler

What is with King and menstruation metaphors though?

 

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53 minutes ago, Tiny Dust! said:
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What is with King and menstruation metaphors though?

 

 

You talking about Carrie? Because that's the only other example of his that really has a theme like that.

 

Edited by Noname215

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On 9/14/2017 at 2:56 AM, Noname215 said:
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You talking about Carrie? Because that's the only other example of his that really has a theme like that.

 

Spoiler

I mean, that's two novels in which a leading female's trauma is partially rooted in her having a period and metaphorically represented by her getting covered in %#$@&!ing blood, from one author.

I'm just saying that it's weird that he went to that very specific well, twice. 

 

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7 hours ago, Tiny Dust! said:
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I mean, that's two novels in which a leading female's trauma is partially rooted in her having a period and metaphorically represented by her getting covered in %#$@&!ing blood, from one author.

I'm just saying that it's weird that he went to that very specific well, twice. 

 

Beverly did not get covered in blood in the novel. In the novel she was in the bathroom after having been frightened by her dad's advances and suddenly hears voices going "We're all the dead kids" from the bathroom sink before a balloon inflates from the drain, bursts and shoots blood over the sink and mirror. That was it. No hair pulling her down or Nightmare On Elm Street style fountains of blood, that was either from the the mind of Cary Fukunaga or Andy Muschietti. In the novel it was also less metaphorical too and just an example of Pennywise trying to scare her.

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And if you wanna know about King using certain themes more than once, the big ones are drug and alcohol abuse, car accidents, and rocky familial relationships.

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6 hours ago, Tiny Dust! said:

I'm thinking of doing a stylish cold war spy story set in the same universe as Fair & Everett, but about 60 years down the line.

Go watch Atomic Blonde. Might you give you ideas.

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4 hours ago, Noname215 said:

Go watch Atomic Blonde. Might you give you ideas.

Nope.

I've watched A LOT of spy movies in my life, and spy fiction isn't a new genre for me. I'm specifically going for something in the vein of James Bond or Guy Ritchie's The Man From U.N.C.L.E

Something a little camp, a little sexy, and a little classy.

Edited by Tiny Dust!

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I was always partial to Roger Moore in The Saint.

If I was ever to do something set during the Cold War I would probably aim for something more along the lines of The Manchurain Candidate. Or in the vein of Tom Clancy.

Edited by Noname215

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