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Aristotlol

What is an adventure game?

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Ron Gilbert asked this on his website a month ago - I think it's an interesting question, so I thought I'd pose it here. I don't think we should expect extreme precision in matters relating to what we might broadly construe as 'the arts', so I suspect that a somewhat adaptable answer might be appropriate. Kendall Walton has a great article in such a vein called 'Categories of Art',* in which he suggests that artistic categories should be thought of as involving standard, contra-standard and variable properties. I'll try to quickly explain them, and then suggest some examples.

Standard properties - properties which are assumed as normal, or taken for granted, in a medium. For instance, we expect films to be projected on flat surfaces; it would be wrong to criticise a film for the fact one couldn't see different parts of it by walking around. The presence of these count towards a work's being included in some category.

Contra-standard properties - the opposite; the presence of these counts against a work's being included in some category. Fully animated pictures might count against a game's being called a text adventure, for instance.

Variable properties - these do not tend to count for or against a work's being included in some category, but can be manipulated for effect. The colours and shapes in a film, for instance.

Bear in mind categories can overlap, a given thing can fall into multiple categories, and the presence or absence of these qualities need not be sufficient to affect something's category.

So, for adventure games I would suggest something like the following (for those of you still reading), excluding the glaringly obvious:

SP: Inventory, puzzles, third-person perspective, dialogue/language, narrative

CSP: first person perspective, (rapid) hand-eye coordination,** time constraints, intuitive physics,*** statistics

VP: Can't think of any interesting examples right now, so I'm going to skip this for the moment. Well maybe there's one - speed of transition between game locations. Or breaking the fourth wall.

*Here I'm skipping the whole question about whether or not video games are art, or can be art. Also fair game, if anyone here's interested?

**Here I mean not just the use of quick reflexes but also platforming generally.

***By physics puzzles I here mean puzzles which involve our thinking about physical forces in an intuitive, spontaneous fashion; the fact that a falling rock will pass through thin glass is a fact I can know theoretically without trying to intuit or calculate the exact information about a specific rock-glass-interaction.

Edit: Now that I think of it, jumping in platform games might well constitute something like the kind of "intuitive physics" I try to describe. Beyond suggesting a phenomenological dissimilarity between games with and without this kind of thought/feeling, I would have to check the literature on our folk understanding of physics to give a better account of it.

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IMHO adventure games are games where you interact with a world and make steps further into the story exploring it and solving puzzles at the same time.

Anything else (2D or 3D, First person or Third person; and so on) aren't really important for me to call a game "adventure game".

But puzzle games are not adventure games, games where there is a puzzle to solve to progress, than another puzzle and so on (like Limbo), or games where you have just puzzles not really related to the story (like Puzzle Agent) are not adventure games in my opinion.

For the games like Limbo I cannot call them adventure games because they are too linear and you cannot walk around, think of a puzzle while you are doing another for example.

A little (even just a tiny bit) of exploration and non-linearity is a must for adventure games.

Obviously this is a personal feeling about adventure games, maybe I'm too attached to Monkey 2 and Grim Fandango! :)

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That's a good point about puzzles being in the game world in a more natural way than in Prof Layton or Puzzle Agent.... But they do commonly appear in more traditional adventure games.

Limbo is a puzzle platformer, not an adventure game - certainly according to the criteria I mentioned.

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It wouldn't even occur to me to call something like Limbo an adventure. I think what distinguishes adventure games for me is that their either don't have action, or the action parts are isolated from the rest of the game. And by action, I really mean anything where the execution matters rather than just knowing what to do.

Something like LA Noire I'd be tempted to call at least partly an adventure game, because the action parts are wholly seperate from the adventure bits. Of course there's a lot of action and driving, so it's not fair to lump the whole game under adventure, but there is that aspect to it. Stacking, I would also broadly call an adventure game, albeit not a traditional one.

I would likewise call Limbo a puzzle platformer. Portal 2 is a puzzle platformer as well.

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1. Slow-paced

2. Dialogue and Story-driven

3. Interactivity with the world

4. An inventory

5. Interesting characters

6. Interesting world

7. Puzzles that blend in with the world.

So is LA Noire any more of an adventure game than Full Throttle is? Both have action segments, both have driving segments.

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This is easy:

An adventure game is one that owes its fundamental play style to Will Crowther's Adventure.

Just as an "RPG" is a game that owes some of its mechanics to pen-and-paper role-playing games like Dungeons and Dragons, and a Rogue-like is a game that owes its gameplay foundation to Rogue.

I find it somewhat unfortunate that we don't capitalize the "A" in Adventure game, since it's a reference to a title, and not the literary genre of adventure.

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An adventure game is a game mainly about solving plot-driven puzzles by manipulating objects in the environment, exploring the world, or interacting with characters.

There can be other stuff too, but them's the basics, I'd say. All adventure games I can think of have those things, and nothing that I am not willing to call an adventure game has all of them. So, for example:

* Portal 2 doesn't really count because the puzzles aren't plot driven, they're just stuff that you have to do to advance to the next bit. Also, you don't really explore the world much beyond going from room to room, and interaction with the characters is very limited

* Unlike Ron Gilbert, I'd say LA Noire does qualify. It has object manipulation (although in this case it's mainly just finding evidence), world exploration and interaction with characters, and puzzles which are plot driven. There are action scenes too, but the bulk of the time is spent doing adventure-game stuff.

* Most RPGs don't count as adventure games because it's rare that they're mainly about solving plot-driven puzzles, though RPGs do have object manipulation, world exploration and interacting with characters.

* Limbo I don't think is an adventure game because while it has puzzles, they're not plot driven - Limbo is in fact very story light, it's just a series of things that happens. It also doesn't have any other real characters (just some people you see, occasionally). I'm not sure an adventure game NEEDS characters, but all the ones I can think of have them.

But it's not a clear line, either. Portal isn't that far off being an adventure game - I think if it had a bit more of a living world and more chances to explore and interact with the characters in it, and if the puzzles had more of a link to the story than most of them do, it'd be an adventure game. And many RPGs are just a hair away from being an adventure game - in Deathspank, the line blurs on a few occasions.

To elaborate on what I mean by plot-driven puzzles, I mean that whatever you are doing will help towards some story goal, and the story goal needs to be a bit better than 'to get to the next room so I can get to the bad guy'. In other words, in an adventure game, my actions are very connected to the world and the story within it, in a puzzle game, not so much. So, for example, In Monkey Island 2 I'm setting up a bucket of mud on Largo's door to get access to his clothes, to make a voodoo doll to drive him off the island to get off the island to go in search of Big Whoop. In Portal, most of the time I'm just doing whatever it takes to move on from wherever I was before. Similarly for Limbo. But in LA Noire I'm searching the crime scene so I can find the clue that will help me when I come to question the suspect to solve the case and catch the serial killer who is on the loose.

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That's why I think adventure games are slow-paced. Games that rely a lot on reflexes aren't adventure games. So that disqualifies portal, since it relies on quick reflexes at certain points.

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That's why I think adventure games are slow-paced. Games that rely a lot on reflexes aren't adventure games. So that disqualifies portal, since it relies on quick reflexes at certain points.

Not at many points. I wouldn't say it relies on quick reflexes at many more points than MI2 - MI2 needs them at a few points, for example, when stabbing the voodoo doll and doing some bits and pieces at the end, and during the cook chase bit, and grabbing the monocle and the spitting contest. Not super-fast, but there were points in that game where I had to do something over because I got the timing wrong the first time.

In portal, there's one particularly reflex-heavy puzzle where you have to do lots of portal placements with precise timing, and a few situations where fast reflexes help, but the vast majority of puzzles can be solved in your own time, just by thinking about the environment and putting portals in the right place. Portal 2 has even fewer reflex based puzzles.

I agree that Portal isn't an adventure game, but not for that reason. I'm not sure slow pacing is necessary for something to be an adventure game. I can imagine a game that plays just like Monkey Island 2 but all the puzzles was on a time constraint and you had to solve them quickly and accurately and react to lots of environmental things that were part of the solution. I'm not sure that would make a very GOOD adventure game (unless somehow it was handled brilliantly), but I'm not sure what else I'd call it.

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It would turn into something similar to the Warioware games. Those aren't adventure games. More like a reflex-based arcade game..

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It would turn into something similar to the Warioware games. Those aren't adventure games. More like a reflex-based arcade game..

That isn't what I just described. Warioware games are about quickly doing a simple activity, with no relation to story. This would be about solving a puzzle, but one that directly ties into the story, but also happens to require reflexes. Sort of like if the WHOLE of Monkey Island 2 was like the end sequence where LeChuck is chasing you around and you have to do lots of things under time constraints and by reacting to what's happening on the screen (like when he turns around to pick up the coin, or when you have to give him the hankie). That would still be an adventure game. It'd probably be really frustrating for a whole game to be like that, but it would be an adventure game that relied, at least partially, on quick reflexes. Hence slow pacing isn't an essential aspect of adventure games, just something that tends to be good implementation-wise.

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I dont count LA noire as adventure game because all the itemfinding is just waiting till your controller busses and the right is just guesing if someone is speaking the truth. And whatever you do you will finish your case almost never you really need to solve stuff.

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I play adventure games for the story, dialogue, and character interaction even more than the puzzle solving, since the puzzles can be too hard or too easy, they're more a means to an end for me. RPG's in particular have really embraced many elements of adventure games.. eg. Vampire The Masquerade: Bloodlines.. an RPG I really enjoyed for the dialogue, story and atmosphere.

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It would turn into something similar to the Warioware games. Those aren't adventure games. More like a reflex-based arcade game..

That isn't what I just described. Warioware games are about quickly doing a simple activity, with no relation to story. This would be about solving a puzzle, but one that directly ties into the story, but also happens to require reflexes. Sort of like if the WHOLE of Monkey Island 2 was like the end sequence where LeChuck is chasing you around and you have to do lots of things under time constraints and by reacting to what's happening on the screen (like when he turns around to pick up the coin, or when you have to give him the hankie). That would still be an adventure game. It'd probably be really frustrating for a whole game to be like that, but it would be an adventure game that relied, at least partially, on quick reflexes. Hence slow pacing isn't an essential aspect of adventure games, just something that tends to be good implementation-wise.

If you can't sit back and enjoy the atmosphere, where's the adventure? A timer would force you to skip dialogue quickly searching for the next puzzle solution. Not an adventure IMO. So yeah, that would change MI2's genre.

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This is a really good question with good responses and while this is partially opinion based, I'd say all the recent games that are being mentioned here, (L.A. Noire, Portals 1 and 2, and Limbo) are not Adventure games, for a lot of the reasons stated here which I agree with, but one that was briefly touched upon, but not enough in my opinion with these games is gameplay.

I know you guys ARE mentioning gameplay, but what I mean is gameplay these games have throughout their entirety that wouldn't be that way in Adventure games. For example, in Limbo and the Portal games, you can JUMP and you do ACROBATICS, now I know some Adventure games will have parts like that where a character will jump or be acrobatic, like in Monkey Island 2 when you get to the bar kitchen through the porthole, but that's only at specific parts, not whenever you want, like in Portal and Limbo, or how in L.A. Noire that are multiple parts where you have foot chases, car chases, or fire fights throughout the entire game. I'm not saying it couldn't work for an Adventure game, it just hasn't been done yet.

Another thing these games don't have (for the most part) are item-environment puzzles, where you get a random item and use said item with the enviroment to solve a puzzle, like in Day of The Tentacle when you use a crowbar to get a quarter out of gum that is stuck on the floor. While Limbo does have environment puzzles where you use items in the environment to solve a puzzle, they are very stationary, like you might might use a box or a rope to solve a puzzle, but you never take that item and use it in another part, like you might do in MI, and they are more expected and noticeable, like how you can easily see a box or rope in Limbo, or how in Portal that except for the gun (which you use for every puzzle, which I don't think has ever happened in an Adventure game where you use the EXACT same item to solve EVERY puzzle, so Grim Fandango and Stacking don't count, and again, I'm not saying this couldn't work for an adventure game, it just hasn't been done yet) every other item for a puzzle was pretty much noticeable and only stays in that part, and again this has been mention, but even more briefly and vaguely than my first point.

I just thought I should mention these since I think these are valid reasons that have been mentioned but only briefly, and I hope to see what you guys think of my expansion on these reasons.

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@PLGamerOmega - **Spoiler Warning** I recently played through Portal 2 and my impression was that it was more than a puzzle game but less than an adventure. I loved the post-apocalyptic atmosphere and the dialogue was good, but the portal gun puzzles eventually became repetitive and boring. Who was Cave Johnson? How did Caroline become GladOS? What happened to all the people? Was anybody still alive on the surface? It was disappointing that every time I reached a new room with computers, desks & filing cabinets, there was nothing I could interact with to uncover more of the plot. I wanted to escape the Aperture labs faster and explore Chell's world especially since the first Portal had covered so much of the same ground.

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It would turn into something similar to the Warioware games. Those aren't adventure games. More like a reflex-based arcade game..

That isn't what I just described. Warioware games are about quickly doing a simple activity, with no relation to story. This would be about solving a puzzle, but one that directly ties into the story, but also happens to require reflexes. Sort of like if the WHOLE of Monkey Island 2 was like the end sequence where LeChuck is chasing you around and you have to do lots of things under time constraints and by reacting to what's happening on the screen (like when he turns around to pick up the coin, or when you have to give him the hankie). That would still be an adventure game. It'd probably be really frustrating for a whole game to be like that, but it would be an adventure game that relied, at least partially, on quick reflexes. Hence slow pacing isn't an essential aspect of adventure games, just something that tends to be good implementation-wise.

If you can't sit back and enjoy the atmosphere, where's the adventure? A timer would force you to skip dialogue quickly searching for the next puzzle solution. Not an adventure IMO. So yeah, that would change MI2's genre.

That's still not what I described. I said "like if the WHOLE of Monkey Island 2 was like the end sequence where LeChuck is chasing you around." I didn't say anything about having to skip dialogue or there being a timer going off all the time. You would have to quickly find the puzzle solution between dialogues, because that's what the end of Monkey 2 is like. But the end of Monkey 2 is still an adventure game. It doesn't temporarily change genre, just because there are a lot of reflex-based puzzles and there's a guy chasing you who messes with you if you stay in one place for too long. I don't think a whole adventure game necessarily SHOULD be like this (unless it was handled brilliantly well), but I do think a whole adventure game COULD be like this.

Hence, again, slow pacing isn't a required part of something being an adventure game, it's just a genre convention that is used most of the time and broken when appropriate (Like the end of Monkey Island 2, or the time limited puzzles in Full Throttle, and so on). There's a difference between something being a genre convention, something that is generally good for a genre (like targeting crosshairs in an FPS) and something being absolutely fundamental to the genre (like a first person perspective in an FPS).

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I dont count LA noire as adventure game because all the itemfinding is just waiting till your controller busses and the right is just guesing if someone is speaking the truth. And whatever you do you will finish your case almost never you really need to solve stuff.

Well, I think you're being a bit unfair on LA Noire. I think LA Noire had a lot of basic problems, but I don't think it's quite like how you say. Yes, the object interaction is just wandering around trying to find important items, but that's true of a lot of adventure games. And you're not supposed to be just guessing if someone tells you the truth, you're supposed to be figuring it out based on the stuff you've found out before - that's a puzzle! And yes, you can finish a case even if you get everything wrong, but it will change the story of the case (even if the over all story arc doesn't change too much). So that's an example of puzzles having a direct relation to plot.

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slow pacing isn't a required part of something being an adventure game, it's just a genre convention that is used most of the time and broken when appropriate

I think it's important to remember most criteria should be construed in a pro tanto fashion.

One question which bothers me is the extent to which the sorts of criteria we have mentioned are determined by past limitations of technology. In this respect I have some mild concern about adventure games being unhealthily conservative... But on reflection I suppose it doesn't have to be bad; probably lots of genres are shaped by practical constraints, that doesn't necessarily preclude such limitations from being stylistically significant.

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I dont count LA noire as adventure game because all the itemfinding is just waiting till your controller busses and the right is just guesing if someone is speaking the truth. And whatever you do you will finish your case almost never you really need to solve stuff.

Well, I think you're being a bit unfair on LA Noire. I think LA Noire had a lot of basic problems, but I don't think it's quite like how you say. Yes, the object interaction is just wandering around trying to find important items, but that's true of a lot of adventure games. And you're not supposed to be just guessing if someone tells you the truth, you're supposed to be figuring it out based on the stuff you've found out before - that's a puzzle! And yes, you can finish a case even if you get everything wrong, but it will change the story of the case (even if the over all story arc doesn't change too much). So that's an example of puzzles having a direct relation to plot.

LA Noire is an adventure game, or at least more an adventure game than anything else. Perhaps it's best to call it an adventure game TC mod for a non-adventure game. It's just a very uncomfortable effort. Certainly nulian is being unfair; for instance, many adventure games let you press a given key to highlight all on-screen objects with which you can interact. And while you can finish the game without solving much, that's still playing the game badly.

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slow pacing isn't a required part of something being an adventure game, it's just a genre convention that is used most of the time and broken when appropriate

I think it's important to remember most criteria should be construed in a pro tanto fashion.

One question which bothers me is the extent to which the sorts of criteria we have mentioned are determined by past limitations of technology. In this respect I have some mild concern about adventure games being unhealthily conservative... But on reflection I suppose it doesn't have to be bad; probably lots of genres are shaped by practical constraints, that doesn't necessarily preclude such limitations from being stylistically significant.

Oh absolutely. It's just that adventures already do break the convention of being slow-paced, frequently. They have lots of puzzles in them that are timing or reflex based, and some of them have quite prevalent action segments (like the bike battles in full throttle, that are actiony, but they're still puzzley). So if you ask me about slow pacing, I'd say it seems to be something that helps adventure games, but it's not a fundamental aspect. The whole adventure house of cards doesn't fall down if you take out slow pacing, it's more like one of the cards near the top that makes the whole thing prettier and more impressive - most of the time.

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Would the Ace Attorney games qualify as adventure games? The have a lot of the same elements at least.

I'd say they would. They have puzzles which are directly related to the plot, exploration of a world (though these parts tend to be the weakest), interaction with characters and manipulation of objects. The nature of the puzzles is a bit unusual, and the pacing out of the game into exploration heavy and puzzle light/puzzle heavy and exploration light segments is also weird, but I think it fits the basic criteria. I think to successfully define an adventure game you have to allow for outliers like this that seem to be adventure gamey in lots of important ways, even though they're a bit weird.

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Would the Ace Attorney games qualify as adventure games? The have a lot of the same elements at least.

I'd say they would. They have puzzles which are directly related to the plot, exploration of a world (though these parts tend to be the weakest), interaction with characters and manipulation of objects. The nature of the puzzles is a bit unusual, and the pacing out of the game into exploration heavy and puzzle light/puzzle heavy and exploration light segments is also weird, but I think it fits the basic criteria. I think to successfully define an adventure game you have to allow for outliers like this that seem to be adventure gamey in lots of important ways, even though they're a bit weird.

Yeah, the only reason I asked was because the exploration segments are the worst parts of the series. I always found myself trying to get through those as fast as possible. The courtroom sequences are the real draw. I think part of the problem with the exploration is it relies so much on pixel hunting.

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It would turn into something similar to the Warioware games. Those aren't adventure games. More like a reflex-based arcade game..

That isn't what I just described. Warioware games are about quickly doing a simple activity, with no relation to story. This would be about solving a puzzle, but one that directly ties into the story, but also happens to require reflexes. Sort of like if the WHOLE of Monkey Island 2 was like the end sequence where LeChuck is chasing you around and you have to do lots of things under time constraints and by reacting to what's happening on the screen (like when he turns around to pick up the coin, or when you have to give him the hankie). That would still be an adventure game. It'd probably be really frustrating for a whole game to be like that, but it would be an adventure game that relied, at least partially, on quick reflexes. Hence slow pacing isn't an essential aspect of adventure games, just something that tends to be good implementation-wise.

If you can't sit back and enjoy the atmosphere, where's the adventure? A timer would force you to skip dialogue quickly searching for the next puzzle solution. Not an adventure IMO. So yeah, that would change MI2's genre.

That's still not what I described. I said "like if the WHOLE of Monkey Island 2 was like the end sequence where LeChuck is chasing you around." I didn't say anything about having to skip dialogue or there being a timer going off all the time. You would have to quickly find the puzzle solution between dialogues, because that's what the end of Monkey 2 is like. But the end of Monkey 2 is still an adventure game. It doesn't temporarily change genre, just because there are a lot of reflex-based puzzles and there's a guy chasing you who messes with you if you stay in one place for too long. I don't think a whole adventure game necessarily SHOULD be like this (unless it was handled brilliantly well), but I do think a whole adventure game COULD be like this.

Hence, again, slow pacing isn't a required part of something being an adventure game, it's just a genre convention that is used most of the time and broken when appropriate (Like the end of Monkey Island 2, or the time limited puzzles in Full Throttle, and so on). There's a difference between something being a genre convention, something that is generally good for a genre (like targeting crosshairs in an FPS) and something being absolutely fundamental to the genre (like a first person perspective in an FPS).

Adventure games aren't about stress. They are about relaxation. Stress should only be used sparingly, like the puzzles involving the antagonist. If you are stressed all the time, then its not an adventure game, sorry.

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It would turn into something similar to the Warioware games. Those aren't adventure games. More like a reflex-based arcade game..

That isn't what I just described. Warioware games are about quickly doing a simple activity, with no relation to story. This would be about solving a puzzle, but one that directly ties into the story, but also happens to require reflexes. Sort of like if the WHOLE of Monkey Island 2 was like the end sequence where LeChuck is chasing you around and you have to do lots of things under time constraints and by reacting to what's happening on the screen (like when he turns around to pick up the coin, or when you have to give him the hankie). That would still be an adventure game. It'd probably be really frustrating for a whole game to be like that, but it would be an adventure game that relied, at least partially, on quick reflexes. Hence slow pacing isn't an essential aspect of adventure games, just something that tends to be good implementation-wise.

If you can't sit back and enjoy the atmosphere, where's the adventure? A timer would force you to skip dialogue quickly searching for the next puzzle solution. Not an adventure IMO. So yeah, that would change MI2's genre.

That's still not what I described. I said "like if the WHOLE of Monkey Island 2 was like the end sequence where LeChuck is chasing you around." I didn't say anything about having to skip dialogue or there being a timer going off all the time. You would have to quickly find the puzzle solution between dialogues, because that's what the end of Monkey 2 is like. But the end of Monkey 2 is still an adventure game. It doesn't temporarily change genre, just because there are a lot of reflex-based puzzles and there's a guy chasing you who messes with you if you stay in one place for too long. I don't think a whole adventure game necessarily SHOULD be like this (unless it was handled brilliantly well), but I do think a whole adventure game COULD be like this.

Hence, again, slow pacing isn't a required part of something being an adventure game, it's just a genre convention that is used most of the time and broken when appropriate (Like the end of Monkey Island 2, or the time limited puzzles in Full Throttle, and so on). There's a difference between something being a genre convention, something that is generally good for a genre (like targeting crosshairs in an FPS) and something being absolutely fundamental to the genre (like a first person perspective in an FPS).

Adventure games aren't about stress. They are about relaxation. Stress should only be used sparingly, like the puzzles involving the antagonist. If you are stressed all the time, then its not an adventure game, sorry.

I agree that it probably wouldn't be a very fun experience, I agree that adventure games tend to be better when stressful moments are uncommon. I just disagree that 'lack of stress' is SO important to an adventure game, that if you had a game that was exactly the same as an adventure game except that the puzzles were mostly of reacting-quickly and time-limited kinds that you sometimes get in adventures, that would completely change the genre. What would make a good adventure game or what good practice is when designing puzzles is a different conversation.

I think talking about pacing as a genre foundation is a tricky one because then you run into all sorts of trouble. There are adventure games that are more or less stressful. Blade Runner is quite stressful a lot of the time but I'd say that's DEFINITELY an adventure game, and a pretty good one - but that works for the type of story they're telling. I haven't played The Last Express, but I hear it plays out in sped-up real time, which gives it a constant time factor uncommon to adventure game, and is bound to make the experience more stressful even if it's not a very tense game - because you know any decision you make is using up time. But again that's sort of what they were going for and I'm not sure that makes it less of an adventure game.

So all that is why I think adventure games being low stress is something that many adventure games adopt, because usually it's appropriate, but it's not a genre fundamental. It's more complicated than that.

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Hey, guys

Guys, listen to me for a sec

Okay.

Guys. Okay, guys-

What if- now listen to me-

What if, just maybe-

What if adventure games, what if

Now stick with me-

People define "adventure game" differently?

Like like like,

What if some people think wandering around looking for things, without a clear idea of what it all leads up to feels adventurey to them. And and,

Some people think fast-paced, constant action is more of an adventure

Or- Or even-

Now don't call me crazy or anything-

"Adventure game" is a broad, blanket term for games that don't stick closely to any one pre-defined genre, or even have alot of those genres OR EVEN NONE OF THOSE wrapped up in them???

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Would the Ace Attorney games qualify as adventure games? The have a lot of the same elements at least.

I think absolutely. If anything, they are more adventure-like than most of what Japan calls Adventure games (which often have almost no gameplay challenge at all).

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People define "adventure game" differently?

Then that's a problem, since language is supposed to be used as a commonality to communicate... The whole idea behind speaking is that words come out of my mouth and into your ear and your brain is able to translate that into the idea I was thinking.

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Hey, guys

Guys, listen to me for a sec

Okay.

Guys. Okay, guys-

What if- now listen to me-

What if, just maybe-

What if adventure games, what if

Now stick with me-

People define "adventure game" differently?

Like like like,

What if some people think wandering around looking for things, without a clear idea of what it all leads up to feels adventurey to them. And and,

Some people think fast-paced, constant action is more of an adventure

Or- Or even-

Now don't call me crazy or anything-

"Adventure game" is a broad, blanket term for games that don't stick closely to any one pre-defined genre, or even have alot of those genres OR EVEN NONE OF THOSE wrapped up in them???

What if we're just having a polite discussion about what we think adventure games are, and don't particularly think you're helping with that tone of yours?

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