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fullyHarshness

The importance of game music

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I'd contend it's more of a Schaconnell thing, but yes, I agree. He's always filled his games with very stylistically appropriate music, and I expect this to be no different. If that means that the game needs to have music in a style I wouldn't usually enjoy, then so be it!

Well, first it would be SCHANELL (let's fight!), but also what about Michael Land and Ron Gilbert? "Giland Schanell"?

...wow, for a moment there I got dizzy because this portmanteau question is SO IMPORTANT IT WILL DETERMINE THE NAMES OF MY CHILDREN.

Edit: and let's not forget The Gone Jackals! So that's... GonJack Schanell no. Giland... um...

Re-edit: I've got Gilandular fever!

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I'd contend it's more of a Schaconnell thing, but yes, I agree. He's always filled his games with very stylistically appropriate music, and I expect this to be no different. If that means that the game needs to have music in a style I wouldn't usually enjoy, then so be it!

Well, first it would be SCHANELL (let's fight!), but also what about Michael Land and Ron Gilbert? "Giland Schanell"?

...wow, for a moment there I got dizzy because this portmanteau question is SO IMPORTANT IT WILL DETERMINE THE NAMES OF MY CHILDREN.

Edit: and let's not forget The Gone Jackals! So that's... GonJack Schanell no. Giland... um...

Re-edit: I've got Gilandular fever!

Well, I like Michael Land's work but I don't consider him quite as versatile as McConnell, and I think McConnell is more capable of producing better work on lower budgets (as much as I enjoyed parts of the Tales of Monkey Island soundtrack, it had a noticeably late-90s midi-ish, feel in comparison to the (also sampled) music for say, Costume Quest. So I guess I'm just not quite so interested in seeing that collaboration as seeing another Schafer-McConnell one. And this project is his two-headed baby, after all.

In summary: music.

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Long story short: A good game becomes a great game with a good soundtrack. Do you think a game like Chrono Trigger would've been as good as it was without a memorable track when fighting a villain like Magus? Or Sephiroth's unforgettable theme from Final Fantasy VII?

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Long story short: A good game becomes a great game with a good soundtrack. Do you think a game like Chrono Trigger would've been as good as it was without a memorable track when fighting a villain like Magus? Or Sephiroth's unforgettable theme from Final Fantasy VII?

The thing is, both those games were from a time before when a game had a lot of speech in it, or a rich sound-design to pad out the audio, and the same with the old adventure games. I love a very memorable, catchy, hummable tune as much as the next guy (in fact, people tell me I'm very good at writing them myself ... which is nice of them). But sound design has come a long way in games, and part of that is that nowadays it's more likely that designers will want to let music take more of a background approach, or be absent altogether in some parts, or be more of an abstract thing than a 'theme'. It's not that game soundtracks have got worse (not that you said they have) - it's more that they perform something of a different (or at least more varied) function to what they used to.

Having said that, I think people like Peter McConnell are great at producing work that strikes a good balance between staying out of the way of the dialogue and sound effects, and slowly creeping under your skin to become really memorable.

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Music is extremely important to me as far as the gameplay experience goes. When a game has a great soundtrack I find myself just sitting in one spot idly listening away and bobbing my head to the beat. I'm also a fan of game soundtrack remixing, especially tracks that I have memorized from years of playing the same game. Contextual audio cues and soundtrack changes are also amazing when done correctly, and I think Portal 2 is a perfect example of this. I think it would be awesome to have a sound test mode in the game as a throwback to the old days.

Edit: HI CARL! ::waves like a madman::

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but beyond that Music is essential as is sound design in general. playing Doom 4 at home, in the dark with a nice 5.1 audio system would not have been the same without the ambiance and sound design. OK DFA is not going to be the same but to consider music and sound design as anything less important than gameplay, graphics... would be a grievous error

I assume you meant Doom 3 as Doom 4 has only just been announced a year or so ago and we haven't seen anything from it yet.

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I say no to film composers. Too background-sounding.

Howdy! Nice to see a familiar face. Erm...avatar...username... whatever.

Also, I disagree. Film music need not always be background (not just talking about musicals here). While I can honestly say I can't remember the music to Finding Nemo and the other films Mr. djdelay mentioned, there are a good number of movie composers who do create memorable music that isn't background sounding. I'm mainly thinking Hans Zimmer here, but also John Powell (especially the Horton Hears a Who '>soundtrack), Harry Gregson-Williams, and of course John Williams.

Of course, I wouldn't expect a movie composer to be composing for computer game since they're probably extremely expensive and probably in contracts for the next few years. In any case, I think the choice of composer should really depend on the type of game we're getting here. I mean, if it's dark and gritty, would Micheal Land really work? Granted, it probably won't be, but that's got to be a consideration, right?

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I say no to film composers. Too background-sounding.

Howdy! Nice to see a familiar face. Erm...avatar...username... whatever.

Also, I disagree. Film music need not always be background (not just talking about musicals here). While I can honestly say I can't remember the music to Finding Nemo and the other films Mr. djdelay mentioned, there are a good number of movie composers who do create memorable music that isn't background sounding. I'm mainly thinking Hans Zimmer here, but also John Powell (especially the Horton Hears a Who '>soundtrack), Harry Gregson-Williams, and of course John Williams.

Of course, I wouldn't expect a movie composer to be composing for computer game since they're probably extremely expensive and probably in contracts for the next few years. In any case, I think the choice of composer should really depend on the type of game we're getting here. I mean, if it's dark and gritty, would Micheal Land really work? Granted, it probably won't be, but that's got to be a consideration, right?

I'm not saying it couldn't work. I'm just saying it's not what I want from this particular old-school adventure project. And I still say that film scores from all those composers are too background-sounding by the very nature of being grand orchestral compositions. Something simpler would be better in this case, in my opinion. Simpler sticks out more. None of the old school adventure games with memorable soundtracks (to me) were grand and orchestral.

Also, I don't remember you. Telltale forums? People keep changing their avatars on different forums lol. And I think we can safely assume it's not going to be dark and gritty. In fact I guarantee it. Either way, it doesn't necessitate a film composer.

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I'm not saying it couldn't work. I'm just saying it's not what I want from this particular old-school adventure project. And I still say that film scores from all those composers are too background-sounding by the very nature of being grand orchestral compositions. Something simpler would be better in this case, in my opinion. Simpler sticks out more. None of the old school adventure games with memorable soundtracks (to me) were grand and orchestral.

Also, I don't remember you. Telltale forums? People keep changing their avatars on different forums lol. And I think we can safely assume it's not going to be dark and gritty. In fact I guarantee it. Either way, it doesn't necessitate a film composer.

I think it really depends on the type of orchestral music. Something that is, say, brass and percussion heavy would stand out a lot more than something string heavy. The Horton Hears a Who soundtrack does this a lot. And even string heavy stuff could really stand out if the music were played by a smaller group with crisper sound (like playing on the frog or something, I dunno, not a strings player.) I think it would really depend on what the composer did with it.

And aww... you don't remember me? All my days of kinda trolling gone out the window! Then again, I do tend to stick to General Chat, and you haven't really been there since I started posting a lot, so I probably just remember a lot of things from my lurking days. On the Telltale forums, I've got the Vault Tech boy avatar at the moment. I think.

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All I know is this. Film scores have been sucking for some time now. I feel as if most composers are writing looped pop songs with an orchestra instead of actual thematic elements and movements.

Take like.. EVERY superhero movie in the last decade. There's always some dumb tribal drum or electronica loop thingy going on. And most of the music is screechy and atmospheric.

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I think it really depends on the type of orchestral music. Something that is, say, brass and percussion heavy would stand out a lot more than something string heavy. The Horton Hears a Who soundtrack does this a lot.

I just disagree. I've watched Horton Hears a Who many times. I love that movie. And yet I can't recall a single memorable theme from it at all (except for that closing number). However, all of the themes from KQ5 and SMI stick out in my mind clearly and plainly. There's something about orchestral music itself that just kind of blends itself into the background. It's meant to be supportive of the action on screen and as a result is put into the background automatically. While old school adventures were actually DRIVEN by the soundtrack, rather than merely being supported by it. They had very few sound effects and voice acting was brand new back then. In fact, in the earlier ones the soundtrack WAS the sound effects.

And aww... you don't remember me? All my days of kinda trolling gone out the window!

Hah. That means you were incredibly unsuccessful as a troll. ;)

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Well, from my perspective the thing that music in video games is most important for is creating the atmosphere. It's quite different from movie soundtracks in the sense that due to it being an interactive medium, there's no easy way to make the music match up to specific actions or events. Hence, its main purpose is to create a mood and sense of place during gameplay. Of course, a memorable theme song is always nice.

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I just disagree. I've watched Horton Hears a Who many times. I love that movie. And yet I can't recall a single memorable theme from it at all (except for that closing number). However, all of the themes from KQ5 and SMI stick out in my mind clearly and plainly. There's something about orchestral music itself that just kind of blends itself into the background. It's meant to be supportive of the action on screen and as a result is put into the background automatically. While old school adventures were actually DRIVEN by the soundtrack, rather than merely being supported by it. They had very few sound effects and voice acting was brand new back then. In fact, in the earlier ones the soundtrack WAS the sound effects.

I dunno. Maybe this is more of a difference in priorities in media. I mean, I can barely remember music from most games except for Age of Empires and Trine, but movie music tends to stick with me forever. I guess this is probably because I'm always looking out for it or something.

Hah. That means you were incredibly unsuccessful as a troll. ;)

Well, it was almost a year ago and mainly confined to the "whatever's on your mind" thread. And a few other threads. I've been to trollhab since.

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It has to be made just for this game, and it better sound epicly good, could always put in a beta of just music for the game.

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Music is extremely important in video games. Just look at Silent Hill. Akira Yamaoka's work is one of the major reasons why the first 3 games (as well as Shattered Memories, in my opinion), were so great, and even helped the other, not-so-well-received games keep their heads above water. Music can drastically change the tone of a particular moment or setting, or even the game as a whole. In my opinion, if a game's primary focus is not on gameplay(such as with adventure, RPGs, survival horror, etc), then music, writing, and overall atmosphere are essential for an engaging, enjoyable experience.

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Yes, I also think that the game music will be very important, and yes I also am a big fan of game music.

As seen in earlier Schaffer productions, his games almost always has been created from clear and specific cultural influences (but of course always mixed in creative ways); pirates, bikers, heavy metal and so forth, and this will probably be the case in this new game too. The music is indeed of great importance to create this worlds, but we can't really get more specific than that (talking about if the music should be orchestrated or not etc.) before we know what kind of themes the game will have this time.

Also, I completely trust big T on this one, can't think of one Schafer game where the music hasn't been awesome and totally in line with the mood of the game.

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Kudos for the importance of game music! It's really too early to tell what kind of music belongs in the game as we know nothing about it, but as has been stated several times in this thread, Peter McConnell would be awesome to have on board. His previous work with Time have all been awesome and contributed so much to Tim's unique style and humour!

That having been said, my main wish for game music in general is that it is not left as an afterthought. Game music should be integrated alongside development so that it truly becomes part of the game, not just an output. I think this is a unique feature of video games, to have the audio adapt and respond as we play.

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