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SmashManiac

Most Overrated Point and Click Adventure Games

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This is gonna be controversial, but I gotta go with Kings Quest, and Space Quest, and actually the entire Sierra adventure game line. Yeah, I know. Now, to be fair, I have not played most of them, in fact the only series I have played to any real degree was Quest for Glory, and actually I kind of liked those ones. but I played the whole thing with a walkthrough open on my other monitor which speaks to my issue with the games..

Ultimately it comes down to dying, or worse, missing something that prevents you from winning but lets you keep playing until you're impossibly stuck. Adventure games require you to experiment and try things, and death punishes you for that same thing. that and I always thought Sierra's writing was a bit on the cheesy-not-in-a-good-way side.

If I'm going to be fair Sierra, or at least early Sierra probably deserves some slack for being frontrunners in a genre that hadn't worked out all it's kinks, and most of these issue were holdovers from the text adventures and tabletop RPG's that spawned them. but I'm not here to be fair, I'm here to categorically define some adventure games as overrated. so chew on that Sierra, if you were still a company that is.

Gabriel Knight 1 is amazing. That game single-handedly justifies their reputation (their sequels and Laura Bow games too).

I want to love the Telltale Games point-and-clicks so much, and they always fall way short of the mark for me. I’ve never liked a single one.

That's a shame. I love seasons 2 (for the story) and 3 (for the gameplay) of Sam and Max; the Hector games made me laugh out loud plenty, and Winslow and Murray alone were enough for me to love ToMI. I reckon Telltale have gotten a lot right in their time; for me, only BTTF was a colossal misfire. (yes, I even liked Jurassic Park!)

I personally feel Machinarium gets a lot more than love than is warranted. Mind you, I've only played it for about 15 minutes, but that was almost enough for me.

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My pick goes to The Longest Journey.

I believe you have confused The Longest Journey with its sequel, named "Dreamfall".

I thought that too for a moment because you definitely can't die in The Longest Journey, but the monkey called Guybrush and the calculator puzzle are definitely from The Longest Journey and not from Dreamfall. I almost feel like SmashManiac may be mixing multiple games together? Not really sure. I loved the The Longest Journey but it just comes down to personal taste so I certainly won't hate on anyone who didn't like it.

Yup, rereading the first post I believe you might be right.

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Might be mixing up TLJ and Dreamfall, because in the latter you do actually die ALOT.

Don't get me wrong, I loved Dreamfall. Just not as much as its predecessor.

And the action and dying part were one of DF's biggest flaws. I still shudder

at the thought of that cave monster.

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I liked the first one, it was made for PC, the second was a poor console game, and was pretty rubbish to boot, I disliked DF, the the longest journey was pretty good, and yes the puzzles were a bit complex, but was a great game, its a puty there is no true sequel to it, apart from DF that really suck balls

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I would agree that Dreamfall was a bit disappointing, but that was only because The Longest Journey was so incredibly good. I've actually only played those games in Norwegian though, so perhaps the translations were not totally up to par.

I also did not particularly like the Telltale games (I've only played Strongbad..., Tales of Monkey Island, Bone, and Sam & Max). Other than that, most adventure games have ranged from decent to really good.

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I have to go with Myst. I don't know if it was over hyped for me but I was SO excited to get it and when I finally got it running on my computer back then, I clicked around the world a bit looking at the various screens and felt no motivation to keep going. Sure I was a little intrigued by the books with the magic pages but that didn't drive me to click on the things I thought might be puzzles...

I can understand that almost every game has an audience but that one certainly wasn't for me...

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I really liked Myst. But the farther in the series they got the worse the puzzles got for me. It wasn't that they were unrelated to what was going on, because they were always like that. It's that they started expecting you to somehow know things that were kind of ridiculous. I don't remember which one it was, but one required you to think about where a classification of thing was on each island and figure out on a grid where it was and the place a marble of the correct color into that grid for a laser on the central island to get it to work. I am probably getting some of the details of that wrong since it's been so long but it was something that convoluted at the very least. I only found this out by looking at a guide. I couldn't even find a place to look at all the places in an overhead view. It was one of those "you're kidding me right?" moments. I felt like so many of the puzzles were just badly designed instead of being hard because they were clever.

Not a case of overrated but I've also been a bit saddened by the 3D Sam and Max games. They're fun. But I keep comparing them to Hit the Road and they just don't stand up to that standard. They also often fall short of the comics. Still worth playing. Just.... not as good as I know they could be, you know?

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Over-rated? That can be taken a couple of different ways. As in people praise it but in reality it sucks or is merely mediocre. Another way is that people worship it, and it's good, but the hype it gets is unrealistic. Here are a few of my choices that fall into both categories.

Syberia, Grim Fandango, Gabriel Knight 2, Machinarium, Tales of Monkey Island, Curse of Monkey Island, BACK TO THE FUTURE, Leisure Suit Larry, Sam Max (Telltale), to name a few.

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I don't want to enter debate mode since I didn't create this thread for this purpose, but I'd like to clarify my opinion.

- Beginning of the game is a tedious tutorial that is completely unrelated to the game's story.

It's a gentle introduction to the mechanics of the game meant for inexperienced people. It also shows a brief glimpse of the magical world of Arcadia, it's threat by a chaotic storm, April's role in fixing things, the end of the old and the dawn of the new, and the fact that April has been having a lot of weird dreams lately. That very much relates to the game's story.

I agree that this part was designed for newcomers, but I feel that it was badly designed even for them. As an introduction to Arcadia, well I'm the down-to-earth type, so if something is presented in a subtle way, I just don't see it or best case scenario I don't understand it. In this case, I simply don't see what you have just described.

- Interesting dual-world concept that is barely exploited.

If by barely exploited, you mean you couldn't switch between them at will, then I get what you mean, but never saw that as a flaw. While the game is more linear because of it, I think that allowing you to switch at will would have added unneeded complexity and caused issues when trying to focus the story. Also, the lack of control is intentional. April is caught up in this against her will, confused and mostly powerless throughout, but continues on non the less, which I think makes her a more interesting character.

I would have indeed appreciated to have a little more control about when and where I could switch between worlds, but most importantly the dual-world mechanic barely affects the gameplay, which is a huge missed opportunity. The best part of the game for me was when one of the NPCs believes your magnet is a magic wand and you have to switch strategies in order to trick him. These kind of moments are extremely rare in this game unfortunately.

- Plot twists are so obvious, there aren't any left.

Which plot twists were obvious?

Honestly, all of them up to some extent. But just to give one example, the moment I saw the old lady in the prologue, I was able to figure out her identity, even though it's only revealed at the very end of the game.

- Illogical puzzles. In particular, killing an alchemist by giving him a calculator. (I still don't get that one.)

I think that was something to do with the use of magic combined with technology, which created a rift in time and spa.. lol Ok, That one I'll give you, but I can't think of any other examples of illogical puzzles.

Well there's also the part where you have to hide into a trash container in order to break into a police station, just to name another one. That makes no sense either.

- Important objects lying at places you don't even think is part of the playable area.

Example?

Metal object lying on the subway rails which looked like part of the rails. I don't remember what it was though, only that I never thought something critical was hidden there.

- Dying. A lot.

Ummm, what? You cannot die in this game.

A lot of people have pointed this out. I'M SORRY I WAS WRONG! What I meant was, I remember playing some segments over and over again including a part where one of the NPCs gets shot, so I assumed it was because of death. Maybe it was game overs? In any case, I didn't play Dreamfall, so that was not the source of confusion.

- Your quest is completely pointless.

Restoring balance between 2 worlds and preventing chaos from wreaking havoc is pointless? Glad you're not a shifter! ;)

The problem is that the prophecies you hear in the game clearly state that you will also destroy that balance after restoring it. So why bother restoring it in the first place? Besides, it's not clear in the game which scenario is better.

- The player character's motivation don't match with mine.

If that's a negative for you, it must be incredibly hard to find entertaining books, films and video games. It's not supposed to be your story, it's April's. You put yourself in her shoes. Just like you decide to become a pirate in Monkey Island, be a bad ass Biker in Full Throttle, attempt to pay off your debt in the afterlife and end up becoming a revolutionary, casino owning, ship captain, dog sledding, skeletal reaper on his way to the 9th underworld in Grim Fandango! :D

I don't play video games to follow the story of some character. That's boring for me. Personally, when I play a video game or read a gamebook, I don't want to roleplay a character. Rather, I become that character. And as I mentioned earlier, it's not clear in the game whether maintaining the balance between the worlds is good or not, and since in my opinion a world with both technology and magic united would be awesome, I get angry every time April wants to do the exact opposite. Never got angry with the player characters from Full Throttle nor Grim Fandango since their actions and motivations are not a matter of opinion but of emotion, and I want to feel that emotion. Yes, a lot of video games have a linear story, but while you're playing the game, I'm thinking about the situation I'm faced with and act accordingly, not the story as a whole and how it's supposed to progress. If a game can't achieve that, then the immersion is broken for me and it becomes much less interesting.

- Those long series of fetch quests that stall the story.

I think I can see where you're coming from, but I think those were mainly to send you out and about to get a feel for the world and it's inhabitants, so you care more about the effect the story has.

I agree with you, but since you don't get to create relationships with these people and since you only see them once, they feel generic and uninteresting to me.

- Some chapters are just plain fairy tales that are loosely linked to the main plot.

Not sure I understand what chapters you're talking about here.

The most obvious example is that monster kidnapping you and that tries to eat you. It's just a variation on Hansel and Gretel.

- That fake mexican/spanish guy that constantly says nonsensical things.

I think he did his job really well, adding mystery and confusion which helps April (and the player) start to question things and prepares her for what she must do.

Again, I'm the down-to-earth type. Even though I finished the game, I still have no idea what the heck he was talking about besides protecting the balance. I like mysteries and confusions rewarded, and here they were not.

- Plot is not resolved at the end of the game.

April helps restore balance to the 2 worlds, which completely wraps up the plot. The epilogue hints at another story, which sets the stage for Dreamfall (and the 3rd game which we'll hopefully see one day!), but that doesn't mean the plot of the Longest Journey is unresolved.

The game doesn't even have the decency of telling you what happens immediately after completing the game's objective besides "to be continued". So no, for me the plot wasn't resolved, just stuck at a cliffhanger.

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I agree The Longest Journey is overrated. Terrible dialogue, cartoony puzzle solutions especially near the start which are at odds with the more serious feel the game's atmosphere has, whole great honking plot points completely dropped towards the end, a main character who is forced to do ridiculous things at the start of the game with the barest minimum of motivation. Ugh. I was totally ready for it to be great, but it's not what I got at all.

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- Important objects lying at places you don't even think is part of the playable area.

Example?

Metal object lying on the subway rails which looked like part of the rails. I don't remember what it was though, only that I never thought something critical was hidden there.

I think I remember this one. Worst puzzle in the game (and there's a fine selection to choose from!) I believe that was a key. Except you don't really know what the key is or what it's for until you get it. In order to get it you have to build a ridiculous contraption out of a big pair of industrial pliers or something, with an inflatable dingy wrapped around it, which you need to then let the air out of slowly to close the pliers.

You do this in order to get a key to open a box, in order to help solve a puzzle to break into (if memory serves) a movie theater. The reason you want to get in is I think because you heard someone might be there, or something. I can't remember the exact reason, I just remember thinking 'nobody would go to all this trouble to get a metal object which might by some miracle be the key you need to break your way into a theater on the basis that you heard a vague rumour that someone you should maybe talk to might be inside!'

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Most adventure games are terrible, I would say - obtuse, dull and poorly-written.

Edit: I don't want to hurt anyone's feelings by being more specific, so instead I'll just risk offending everyone.

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Most adventure games are terrible, I would say - obtuse, dull and poorly-written.

Edit: I don't want to hurt anyone's feelings by being more specific, so instead I'll just risk offending everyone.

I wouldn't know. I haven't played most of them. The ones I have played have been ones I expected to be, er, acute, exciting and well-written. For the most part they've been that, with the above exception and one or two others.

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Most adventure games are terrible, I would say - obtuse, dull and poorly-written.

Edit: I don't want to hurt anyone's feelings by being more specific, so instead I'll just risk offending everyone.

I wouldn't know. I haven't played most of them. The ones I have played have been ones I expected to be, er, acute, exciting and well-written. For the most part they've been that, with the above exception and one or two others.

How nice for you.

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Most adventure games are terrible, I would say - obtuse, dull and poorly-written.

Edit: I don't want to hurt anyone's feelings by being more specific, so instead I'll just risk offending everyone.

I wouldn't know. I haven't played most of them. The ones I have played have been ones I expected to be, er, acute, exciting and well-written. For the most part they've been that, with the above exception and one or two others.

How nice for you.

It IS nice for me, but I'm all about sharing. You too can access this dimension of pleasure, by mainly playing games you reckon will be good.

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It IS nice for me, but I'm all about sharing. You too can access this dimension of pleasure, by mainly playing games you reckon will be good.

Too much spare time and too open a mind for that. *haughty sniff*

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This is gonna be controversial, but I gotta go with Kings Quest, and Space Quest, and actually the entire Sierra adventure game line. Yeah, I know. Now, to be fair, I have not played most of them, in fact the only series I have played to any real degree was Quest for Glory, and actually I kind of liked those ones. but I played the whole thing with a walkthrough open on my other monitor which speaks to my issue with the games..

I really wanted to like Sierra but have never been able to bring myself to do so.

Caveat: I've not played Gabriel Knight, or Phantasmagoria, or any of the Quest for Glory games. I hear good things about them so I'll probably check them out some time.

But as for the main Sierra game lines? I really suspect they're the sort of thing which succeeded only because they were the first to do what they do, rather than anything they actually did well.

King's Quest/Space Quest: Early games are notoriously unforgiving and have extremely illogical puzzles, and a mildly irritating sense of humour. Later games have a really appallingly bad sense of humour and some of the worst voice acting I've ever encountered.

Police Quest: First one is OK though I felt it departed too much from the police procedural angle towards the end. Second one has that atrocious bit where if you didn't play the gun sight adjustment minigame to an absolutely tedious extent early on you'd get shot and killed arbitrarily. In general the series became so obsessed with the minor, niggling details of police procedure that it ceased to be fun.

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King's Quest/Space Quest: Early games are notoriously unforgiving and have extremely illogical puzzles,...

challenge-accepted.png

Name one and I'll explain it.

and a mildly irritating sense of humour.

Yeah, well, that's like, your opinion, man. :P

Police Quest: First one is OK though I felt it departed too much from the police procedural angle towards the end. Second one has that atrocious bit where if you didn't play the gun sight adjustment minigame to an absolutely tedious extent early on you'd get shot and killed arbitrarily. In general the series became so obsessed with the minor, niggling details of police procedure that it ceased to be fun.

Well, Police Quest was kind of an adventure/simulator hybrid. The point WAS to be tedious to know what Police go through. And personally, I think PQ2 was the most forgiving of them all, and the most adventurous. I recall that they actually utilized the first Police Quest as training for new recruits/cadets/whatever.

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I'll probably have rocks thrown at me for this, but Grim Fandango. Cool characters, funny plot, but it felt like I was trudging through mud. I couldn't figure ANYTHING out without looking at a walk through! Felt like such an idiot.

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I'll probably have rocks thrown at me for this, but Grim Fandango. Cool characters, funny plot, but it felt like I was trudging through mud. I couldn't figure ANYTHING out without looking at a walk through! Felt like such an idiot. I really enjoyed the Telltale adventure games, picked up Sam & Max and the Back to the Future! and quite enjoyed both of em. Good value for $20-30 or whatever it is for all 5 episodes during a steam sale. I wouldn't ever pay that much each though, as they were very short.

Boo! Jeer! Although I agree that in one or two parts it wasn't great. Notably the forest of bone. The whole thing was hampered a little by the terrible controls. Still love it to bits, though.

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I'll probably have rocks thrown at me for this, but Grim Fandango. Cool characters, funny plot, but it felt like I was trudging through mud. I couldn't figure ANYTHING out without looking at a walk through! Felt like such an idiot.

:: Throws rocks at you :: :P

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I have to say I could never get into TLJ. Tried the demo back in the day, and wasn't even interested enough to finish it. After all of the continued hype I tried it again, and it still didn't interest me. Granted I never played through the whole game, so maybe it gets really good after the first hour?

I'm really surprised by a lot of the Sierra hate on here. I always thought Sierra adventures were the best, and Lucasarts were always good fun but second in my mind. Speaking of which, as far as overrated games go I have to second Grim Fandango. Loved Sam & Max, Maniac Mansion/DOTT , Monkey Island and Full Throttle, but played through 3/4 of GF and never thought it was good enough to finish.

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I'm really surprised by a lot of the Sierra hate on here. I always thought Sierra adventures were the best, and Lucasarts were always good fun but second in my mind. Speaking of which, as far as overrated games go I have to second Grim Fandango. Loved Sam & Max, Maniac Mansion/DOTT , Monkey Island and Full Throttle, but played through 3/4 of GF and never thought it was good enough to finish.

You, sir, are a terrible human being.

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I have to say I could never get into TLJ. Tried the demo back in the day, and wasn't even interested enough to finish it. After all of the continued hype I tried it again, and it still didn't interest me. Granted I never played through the whole game, so maybe it gets really good after the first hour?

I'm really surprised by a lot of the Sierra hate on here. I always thought Sierra adventures were the best, and Lucasarts were always good fun but second in my mind. Speaking of which, as far as overrated games go I have to second Grim Fandango. Loved Sam & Max, Maniac Mansion/DOTT , Monkey Island and Full Throttle, but played through 3/4 of GF and never thought it was good enough to finish.

The Longest Journey lives up to it's name. It is an EPIC game, by adventure game standards. So if one hour is how long you spent on the game, then, er, yeah, it does get better in the next 15-30 hours. There is a LOT of dialogue though, so it can be exhausting.

I don't think the puzzles and story are as messy as others would have you believe, though.

Grim Fandango is the pinnacle. That's all I have to say about that. ;)

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By far the most overrated adventure game for me has to be SAM & MAX HIT THE ROAD. I found the characters incredibly insufferable and unfunny, and the puzzles which involved "Use Max" was some of the cheapest I could remember. I cannot explain how much I hate this game - I really, really, really do.

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By far the most overrated adventure game for me has to be SAM & MAX HIT THE ROAD. I found the characters incredibly insufferable and unfunny, and the puzzles which involved "Use Max" was some of the cheapest I could remember. I cannot explain how much I hate this game - I really, really, really do.

I've only played it once and I remember not being impressed with it at all, for I think the same sort of reasons. I've played day of the tentacle and the first two monkey islands countless times but sam and max has never drawn me back for another playthrough.

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King's Quest/Space Quest: Early games are notoriously unforgiving and have extremely illogical puzzles, and a mildly irritating sense of humour. Later games have a really appallingly bad sense of humour and some of the worst voice acting I've ever encountered.

I'm on your side with this in that the games sense of humor is very weird. Space Quest was hilarious though. I definitely was playing KQ/SQ with a walkthrough in hand but that was more because I would kill myself 50 ways before I'd accomplish anything. Lucasarts biggest achievement was putting out adventure games where you didn't have to die all the time or get stuck for forgetting mission critical item in level 1 that you needed on level 10. This gave you more opportunity to just relax and enjoy the game, and sometimes the puzzles would just come to you, even if they weren't the most logical, you'd have fun with trial and error.

Everything Sierra is still way overrated though. The AGD versions are actually really good having streamlined the whole game, their KQ3 was the best redo yet.

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Everything Lucasarts is way overrated.

See how easy it is to say? It's called opinion. What is overrating anyway? Obviously a group of people thought Sierra games were good enough to rate as high as they did because they enjoyed them. Just because they didn't appeal the same way to others doesn't mean it was overrated. I mean, it's different if you're talking about one game, but people here are labelling the ENTIRE SIERRA CATALOGUE as overrated. That's pretty ambitious, arrogant, and not based on any truth whatsoever.

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The problems here seem to come from the thread title indeed. Like with the opinions thrown here, everybody seems to have a different idea of "overrated". Maybe if the title was "Acclaimed adventure games I didn't like" or something similar (as that is what most people are posting) some discussions could be avoided...

By the way, I didn't like TLJ either, and I really wanted to. The dialogues or some scenes were way too long for my personal taste, and so much time without interacting, but just watching and listening, drew me out of the game constantly. I didn't finish it, but most people are so positive about it that it's always in my "play in the future" list. I wasn't a great fan of the King Quest series either, although it had more to do with typical Sierra issues like the possibility of dying or going further without something you might need later. They were very nicely done though, and most puzzles weren't bad at all. Anyway, I loved other Sierra franchises (I'm a huge Gabriel Knight fan).

Two quite popular games nobody has mentioned yet but that I didn't especially like were "Post-Mortem" and "Still Life". I did like some parts of them (the atmosphere and the first two thirds of the game in the former, and the 20s parts in the sequel), but mixed with the (for me) not-so-great parts those games left me with a quite bitter taste.

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