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POLL: Who wants to get into the industry?

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I can't say I want to get into the Industry, but for fun I've written a sequel for Brutal legend - always been a fan of reading, and the writing was pretty fun too, but definitely a lot fo work! I'll probably send it in once I go finish the latest draft. Sorry, no pictures (yet?)

Other than that, I'd love to try voice acting - that would be something I could do well!

I don't see either becoming a career path for me at my age, probably!

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I'm a game journalist, which I don't consider part of the industry, but I wouldn't mind going over to the other side, and I've dabbled in development before.

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I'd like to be a game tester and write up bug reports like one of the "wacky" internet reviewers. I would also require the right to kick anyone in the balls who pisses me off enough with their horrible game design/programming/music selection. I'm not kidding.

Granted,I would be a difficult hire,but considering I can pull up references to any game design concept at any time and explain in great detail what did and didn't work and how to improve it,I think I'd pay off in the end. And considering what crap gets past even programmer testing to see if it works at all,I'd say the industry needs people like me. :P

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I'm too busy working on scripts and busting into the film industry to worry about such things. Of course, if I ever made it big (aka, hit the lottery and funded my own movie and then, through some fluke of nature, became big) I'd love to write a game at some point, as long as motion gaming/3D don't completely dominate the industry by then.

If I ever met somebody who was into making games, I'd certainly consider co-writing with them in my spare time, as long as they had a solid idea. Film just wins out as my true love (by a slim margin.)

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i run a little game studio in Toronto called Untold Entertainment Inc. We had a hit last year with Sissy's Magical Ponycorn Adventure, a game i developed with my 5-year-old daughter Cassandra (play it here!)

i've been making games professionally for twelve years now - mostly for kids. We're working on a more aged-up title called Spellirium right now, which is a trashpunk graphic adventure /word puzzle game. Here's a little snippet of monster combat from an early build, without sound:

Every puzzle has a different solution. In this one, you have to spell words with blue tiles only, in order to damage the blue monster.

So you still get to walk around beautiful environments talking to characters, but instead of inventory-based puzzles, we have word-based puzzles. You can find out more and read my developer diary on the official Spellirium site, or join the Facebook page for daily progress updates.

Let me just say: the DFA project is a DREAM COME TRUE for a guy like me who's making an adventure game RIGHT THIS MINUTE. Just being able to pop into these forums to put a finger on the pulse of the real, live adventure game community is a godsend! i'm really looking forward to gaining insight into how seasoned pros like Tim and Ron approach puzzle design, concepts, scheduling, and writing ... and how the community reacts to this and other adventure games.

i am, in a big way, in it and of it! What a blast!

- Ryan

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I'd like to be a game tester and write up bug reports like one of the "wacky" internet reviewers. I would also require the right to kick anyone in the balls who pisses me off enough with their horrible game design/programming/music selection. I'm not kidding.

Granted,I would be a difficult hire,but considering I can pull up references to any game design concept at any time and explain in great detail what did and didn't work and how to improve it,I think I'd pay off in the end. And considering what crap gets past even programmer testing to see if it works at all,I'd say the industry needs people like me. :P

You poor, poor soul. QA testing is like working at a hamburger restaurant.

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You'd stand a better chance if you were or knew someone in the industry. You'd also have to build some credit up within it before people start listening to you (kind of like in here lol). Then you would have to consider marketing capabilities of the title, assess asset costs, time scales, etc. Heck, the answer to that question may be answered in the 2 player vids. But if you're really passionate about it then go for it. That stone's not gonna throw itself, so make it count.

Oh, I'm aware. :) As an avid writer and gamer, I've toyed with the ideas in a few design docs. I think my goal would be at a design/production level. I haven't programmed games since my MUD days in the mid-90s, but I've been led to believe I have a good deal of creative savvy.

We shall see. The novel is the most important bit, I think, for moving away form IT and establishing myself. My photography has helped a bit, but going back to school really put a damper on that as well. Maybe by the time the game comes out, I can post in here about a Kickstarter for my book ;)

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i run a little game studio in Toronto called Untold Entertainment Inc. We had a hit last year with Sissy's Magical Ponycorn Adventure, a game i developed with my 5-year-old daughter Cassandra (play it here!)

Ryan, that's awesome. I've actually heard of the Ponycorn Adventure... maybe on Ars Technica or joystiq? I dunno, somewhere. It's great that things are working out well, and I can only imagine how beneficial this current event is for you and others in your shoes.

:)

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I used to learn a bit of everything, programming, making stuff in Hammer and level design, even a little in 3DStudioMax, but as time passed evil was closing in and big companies gone evil took over, and suddenly that's all there was. With stuff leaking about companies mistreating their employees every interest in getting a job in games got shattered. Since indie games are getting bigger now i was dreaming about picking up programming again, and just plunging head first into it, but i fear i'm to old, i have bills to pay, i just can't. Games always been a huge part of me, and they make up some of my best childhood memories, but i guess that's how it goes. Though i think a NICE company like DF willing to get adventurous and employing me *wink wink* could profit from my creativity and still often child-like imagination. Meh, I fear that train left the station.

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Hmm, not exactly any of those options for me. I'd love to work in the game industry, but I can't afford to go to school! So I feel that I'm not exactly qualified enough to be actively really trying to get in. For now I'm just working on my own projects, and doing my best to improve.

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I've already been in the industry doing FX for a couple of years, but I was made redundant. The company I was working at (Sidhe) just wasn't getting enough deals signed, so most of the artists had to go :(

These days I'm working on FX at Weta Digital, but would give almost anything to be back in games... But there isn't really anywhere in NZ to do it, other than a tonne of small companies making iPhone games.

I'm so jealous of every last person at Double Fine.

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I've played a lot of adventure games.

I've always wanted to make my own.

I only program in Qbasic and a little JavaScript so I don't think I'm qualified.

But I would love to be in this industry it would be better then cutting granite.

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Games are part of my heritage...there's not much to do where I live...so games was it! Hopefully one day I can be a part of the industry outside of my role as a consumer.

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Games are part of my heritage...there's not much to do where I live...so games was it! Hopefully one day I can be a part of the industry outside of my role as a consumer.

Like i said before, find something you're good at and stick with it. AAA titles take thousands of folks to produce and not all of them are programmers, artists, or designers. There's a story about an accountant i heard was in the game industry (so now he's a "cool" accountant) and he loved what he did because of that. Use whatever skills you have and if you're persistent enough, you'll get there.

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Becoming a video game programmer has always been my dream because video games have always been a part of my life and I absolutely love programming. I was using the Commodore 64 before I started Kindergarten and I've been using computers and playing video games ever since.

I have found that I thoroughly enjoy programming in pretty much any fashion (accept trying to write HTML/CSS that produces a page that looks and behaves the same on multiple browsers, but then again nobody does). I am fortunate enough have a job where I get to do some C# development and I love every minute of it. I enjoy going over the same code multiple times and enhancing the efficiency, adding new functionality and making methods multi-threaded.

I think the biggest roadblocks for me as far as developing my own game are 1.) I am not an artist and would need artwork 2.) You have to develop and game engine AND game content, I think by the time you I could both the game engine is would be outdated.

I think the growing popularity of indie games with simpler graphics is exciting; it renews my hope in the possibility of creating a simple game and proves that gameplay and story are more important than graphics.

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I'd like to be a game tester and write up bug reports like one of the "wacky" internet reviewers. I would also require the right to kick anyone in the balls who pisses me off enough with their horrible game design/programming/music selection. I'm not kidding.

Granted,I would be a difficult hire,but considering I can pull up references to any game design concept at any time and explain in great detail what did and didn't work and how to improve it,I think I'd pay off in the end. And considering what crap gets past even programmer testing to see if it works at all,I'd say the industry needs people like me. :P

You poor, poor soul. QA testing is like working at a hamburger restaurant.

Yes,that's why I made note of special rights and privileges. Which I would take regardless of whether or not they are given. I find too many developers take for granted the fact most of the people they piss off with their shitty games can't kick them in the nuts. Or call them retards. Or strap them down in a chair and force them to play better games than what they make that do the same thing only a million times better. All while I stand over them,laughing maniacally at their pain.

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I'd like to be a game tester and write up bug reports like one of the "wacky" internet reviewers. I would also require the right to kick anyone in the balls who pisses me off enough with their horrible game design/programming/music selection. I'm not kidding.

Granted,I would be a difficult hire,but considering I can pull up references to any game design concept at any time and explain in great detail what did and didn't work and how to improve it,I think I'd pay off in the end. And considering what crap gets past even programmer testing to see if it works at all,I'd say the industry needs people like me. :P

You poor, poor soul. QA testing is like working at a hamburger restaurant.

Yes,that's why I made note of special rights and privileges. Which I would take regardless of whether or not they are given. I find too many developers take for granted the fact most of the people they piss off with their shitty games can't kick them in the nuts. Or call them retards. Or strap them down in a chair and force them to play better games than what they make that do the same thing only a million times better. All while I stand over them,laughing maniacally at their pain.

From what I've heard though, it's more a matter of needing better producers/developers. i.e., people who won't say, "Oh... it crashes whenever you do that...? Crap, ah well, ship it anyway." or "Yeah, right, Mr. QA guy. Sure it crashes. Whatever you say..." At least that's how I take it from reading The Trenches and their stories. Though I suppose if you hold the right to kick whoever you want in the balls, then you may not have problems with bug reports not being fixed. ;) Though make sure you include the producers in the list of ball-kicking targets, as may times they set deadlines that force the designers/developers to cut corners, leave bugs in the game, and overall leaving the game when it needs a lot more work done on it.

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No option in this poll really holds 100% true for me. I'd be interested but it's not something I've pursued so far.

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All through out childhood I wanted to be a video game programmer. Then I found out I suck at programming (3 college courses and all failed. Highest grade was a 39).

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Oh,everyone would be viable targets for ball kicking and you'd be surprised how fast people will tell you who's the source of the problem when their genitals are on the line.

Ironic,you might want to consider just looking stuff up on your own on the internet. Alot of the information in college courses is available on-line for free if you just look it up. Learn,figure it out,ask questions,and,when you feel sure you know how to code well enough,take the courses,get your degree,and go on to being an asset to the industry. :D

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I wish that there was an intermediary step.

There are a few things that I am doing now that are gaming industry adjacent, but none have me directly getting into game development (which I have no real interest in doing). A friend & I are developing a gaming podcast, but won't finalize anything until we have something that we are both happy with, I work gaming/comic book conventions on my vacations, I write/draw a webcomic that directly involves video games but isn't about them specifically, and my wife & I are actively saving to someday open up a gaming store of our own.

None of the options in the poll really lent for these kinds of activities...:(

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I am not interested in the slightest! I'd rather just play the games. :)

Smiles

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I work in QA at Twisted Pixel Games in Austin. I am working on my portfolio as well to move into a design role.

QA is fun. Sometimes we overstate the problems with the job making it seem like we have a "rough" life.

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I've been mulling around with what I think would be an entertaining idea for a game, but I haven't really put any effort into getting into the gaming industry (to busy working 2 crappy jobs). Still it is something I would love to do.

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I'm a 3D artist, making 3D mobile games and TV adverts. We would love to get investment to pursue bigger projects and teams :)

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(almost)Graduate programmer here, I got a fair bit of freelance from a friend, with a ridiculously huge global company I can't mention and they've referred me to so much work I had to start turning it down. So I ran with it, tacked a business management unit onto my course and got involved with a local startup help scheme and started a company with a good friend. It's made for one hell of a tough final year though lol. Most of it is non-traditional games stuff using games tech (Gamification is becoming a big buzz-word in the corporate world ) that isn't flash, but we'll be using every ounce of spare time/money to put into making our own traditional games.

I've got a lot of friends who've ended up in games jobs one way or the other too which is nice, it's been something I've never really been able to see myself not doing, whether that ends up being a hobbyist weekend thing, or lead programmer for a big company.

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I would really like to be a part of it, and though it feels like a slow start I believe I'm getting somewhere at least. No internships or jobs, I just started developing small prototypes myself and been reading a lot about the matter since last year. On that note, to everybody here that doesn't know how to start or that doesn't think they have what it's needed I super recommend reading The Art of Game Design by Jesse Schell. And no, I'm not a bot, but reading that book put a lot of things in perspective for me and helped me decide to at least start doing something. Good luck with your projects

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To people mentioning education background. It is not very important in the Gaming industry. It is HELPFUL, but not a requirement. I went to a 4-year university and got an Economics degree before pursuing games. My boss didn't go to college at all. And some of my co-workers are Computer Science or Game Design students. So it is a whole mixture of education backgrounds.

The SINGLE MOST IMPORTANT THING is a portfolio. It trumps EVERYTHING! Don't talk about games or make a sweet cover letter, SHOW THEM what you can do... unless you want to go into production, in which case a portfolio doesn't apply and you need a more business oriented skill set.

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I'm about to graduate with a B.S. in computer science. I'm pretty sure I'm going to take a programming job with a non-gaming company just to start off with, but I would absolutely love to work on video games for a living, either as a programmer or a game designer. I've been knocking on almost every door that I can find, and it feels like no one's hiring people who are fresh out of college with no industry work experience. Which seems silly, because I've coded for years and have lots of completed game projects that I could show to people, but because none of them were made for companies, no one wants to talk to you right off the bat.

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Being a game designer has always been a dream of mine. Even got started on a little solo project a while back, but never really had the time or the artistic talent to actually make it work. Still like to fantasize about it, but it honestly just seems like too much of a long-shot.

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