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DF Chris Remo

Episode 2: A Promise of Infinite Possibility

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The premise Tim is talking about (two distinct storylines, set in different worlds, running in parallel) reminds me of my favorite novel of all time "Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World" by Haruki Murakami. I'd love to see a game that has a similarly eerie and mysterious atmosphere.

Here's an amazon link for people interested in the book: http://amzn.com/0679743464

A better example perhaps is his new book 1q84, it's exactly the type of story that Tim was talking. A man and a woman that live in different worlds and are bound to met.

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I'm really digging the documentary videos so far. Good job 2 Player Prods.

A few quick comments--

-- I love getting this peek behind the curtain, and I love the fact that the game starts its life as a bunch of scribbles in a big spiral notebook covered with stickers.

-- Puzzles: You have to have puzzles, certainly. That is definitely the right decision. Just make sure they are logical, and international-friendly ("monkey" wrench, anyone?).

-- I like the story idea so far, the boy & the girl, parallel stories, etc. My only negative thought about it is that the two settings that were hinted at are so common and overused in video games -- spaceships and medieval castles. It might feel a little ho-hum to play an adventure game in these types of worlds that gamers have trounced around a million times before.

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Probably best that they didn't call it Reaper Man as that is also the name of a fantastic book by Terry Prachett. These documentaries are fantastic so far. More than worth the price so far and we haven't even gotten to the game yet.

The thing I've always loved about the adventure games was the puzzles. There is nothing more satisfying then getting past a puzzle you've been stuck at. Characters are important too. I can't imagine Monkey Island without Guybrush, Elaine, and LeChuck.

I really like the idea of parallel stories/ worlds especially if they can effect each other like in Day of the Tentacle. Can't wait until episode 3.

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I'm glad they brought up Machinarium but I didn't like how the only other commentary was Wolpaw .
There were loads of others...

Save from the developer of course. At least I got the impression that his was the final word on that game which left me a little disappointed.

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Also: Hipster glasses and mustache guy who doesn't like puzzles. Evil hipster!

Careful man! He'll send GlaDOS after you! That's Eric Wolpaw (and I'm pretty sure he's being sarcastic).

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Excellent video. Great to see the creative process.

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Wow I really want the music from these when it's all over. Simply incredible.

Gotta check out Fastfall (http://lifeformed.bandcamp.com/album/fastfall)

Much of the music so far has been remixes of tracks from this album (though this episode had a lot more stuff I didn't recognize, I've been hoping for that). Fastfall is worth it just for the first track Cider Time! Never get's old!

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Fantastic episode. For some reason the title screen that Tim showed a little bit made think of the "Draw with me" video that was drawn a while back and posted on youtube/deviantart http://fc02.deviantart.net/fs43/f/2009/077/2/9/Draw_With_Me_by_Mikeinel.wmv

Anyways, the premise seems really cool and I have to agree with the majority of the people saying puzzles are necessary ^^ They give it a certain amount of interactivity which is great. They just need to be logical and make you feel like you're supersmart for solving them :}

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It's kinda like I have friends in the gaming industry :) Just what I've always wanted!

Keep up the great work!

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Brilliant, thanks so much! Who knew 20 minutes of talking about meeting and notebooks could be so much fun?

That said it's really interesting to think what makes these games interesting. I never played the original Monkey Island or Day of the Tentacle cause we didn't even have a computer until 97 or so. Then my cousin gave me his old one (running Win95 and with a whopping 1,16GB hard drive!) along with a copy of Riven and I was lost to the world for weeks! (Until I found out about walkthroughs)

The Myst games are very different from what they do here I think, mainly because they're quite serious. But I loved them because 1: I could explore freely and immerse in the world, 2: they told interesting stories where I was never sure what was going to happen next and 3: they has interesting characters. All those are very necessary for me to get into a game. Humor is also great where appropriate, and I quite like good puzzles. But the puzzles need to be part of the storytelling and not so hard that you end up combining random items or doing the same racetrack over and over because it has to be perfect. I mostly hate racetracks. I think they're a guy thing. I have no patience with them.

Games I've loved are Myst 1, 2 and 3, Portal 1 and 2, Half-Life 2 + episodes (on easy setting). And I really enjoyed the Telltale Sam & Max and Monkey Island episode games. Tried getting into Elder Scrolls Oblivion and Fallout but I hate hate hate getting to the next part of the story and realizing that I need more XP to be able to do it. Completely puts me off. Also hate the whole bargaining issue. Guess it's a patience thing again...

Anyway, that's my two very random and possibly incoherent cents. Looking forward to the next video!

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Sorry if someone has already said this, and I mean to be fairly jocular, but where does Craig Adams get off talking about flow when Superbrothers asks you to stop playing for a month?! When I came back to it I had to adjust to the logic and mechanics all over again.

Edit: the readjusting is probably more symptomatic of the Steam version, though.

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It definitely needs gorgeous, detailed backgrounds. Like, this was what made Machinarium stand out so much, the first time at the wall, on the elevator... that was incredible.

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It definitely needs gorgeous, detailed backgrounds. Like, this was what made Machinarium stand out so much, the first time at the wall, on the elevator... that was incredible.

Definitely! Also, I usually only play games with puzzles, and I like the inventory/combine-these-things system. Also, I'm a pointer & clicker, so yes please!

I love these behind-the-scenes videos, and the humour. I've always loved the humour in Tim's and Ron's games, so looking forward to that!

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Yknow what I like in an adventure game that's puzzle-oriented? Non-linearity. Give me 8 different puzzles that are "open" at any given time. So maybe I get frustrated with one, and go check out another -- and then maybe I have a sudden epiphany about some puzzle I was working on earlier. There was a very short Homestarrunner adventure game that did this wonderfully. And Dark Souls does this very well, but more in the context of combat and gear. "Oh man, now I have anti-lightning armor! Maybe I'll go try that place with the lightning dragons again."

It's the difference between feeling like "I'm stuck" and feeling like "I'm working on it".

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The last time I was frustrated to the point that I had to search the web for a solution was in an episode of Blackwell Legacy. The problem was you had to look in a mailbox, but when I first approached the mailboxes the first few I moused over had the exact same name and clicking on them produced the same geneic response, I briefly/quickly moused over all of them and missed the fact that one of them had a unique name, because of that I thought they were all the same. If they had given them unique names (mailbox #1, mailbox #2, etc) I would have realized it wasn't a giant bounding box over all the mailboxes and I would have explored them further.

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Excellent episode Time and 2 Player. Please keep the puzzles in the game. There's only a few kind of puzzles that I hate. I hate it when you've clicked on an object and you get no reaction to it and then later in the game, clicking on it will cause a reaction. If an object is now suddenly important, give some visual or verbal indication that it's somehow different. I don't want to have to click on every object after every event in a game.

I also hate it when you have multiple items in your inventory that should be able to serve the same function, but won't. Like when you have a cup, a bowl, and a bottle. But only the bottle will hold water. Why can't I fill up the bowl or cup with water? Please avoid those sorts of situations.

I think that the most important part of a game is the characters. With the story coming in a close second. When I think about games that I'm nostalgic about, I always think about the characters and story the most. These are the things that make us care about the game.

I loved your random jokes in the beginning about the game being about chinchillas, super violence, nudity, and a snuff game. Please include your twisted sense of humor in the game.

I'm really excited about your concept of having 2 main characters being from 2 different worlds. Sci fi vs fantasy. Men vs. women. Why not take it one step further and have the sci-fi world have just men in it. And the fantasy world will only have women in it. Each world has never seen the other gender. The males create offspring via science: cloning. And the females create offspring with magic. When the main characters meet, they'll each think that the other one is an alien. Of course, I'm blatantly ripping off the plot of the anime Vandread.

Keep up the good work.

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This looks great!

I think Beyond paying your team (or firing them all for the lack of money - which we know you wont because you have nearly +$3.0M USD fresh from the Kickstarter hehe), beyond puzzles and beyond pretty much everything else, I believe this game should focus on the story. Us backers are here because we want to listen to what that boy and girl (or the Armadillo and Spider) have to say or want to accomplish - an engaging story will leave most other parts on a second plane if you ask me - relevance and value of the project will come from the characters...

I cant but wait to see how the 2 main characters met (If they ever do), will it be; romantic, ugly, happy, grim, ironic, even kinky?

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Great video! I love stories about switching between worlds like Stephen King's "The Talisman" or "The Longest Journey" and I can't wait to see the Double Fine take on the idea. I can't wait to see how Winsor McCay plays into all of this.

...also, I would be EXTREMELY interested in procuring a copy of that Grim Fandango journal.

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I love the boy/girl idea. It sounds great. I think a coming of age story will be able to invoke the nostalgia theme without having to rely on old game techniques because it is already a nostalgic topic for so many people.

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Great update! It is really amazing to be able to hear so much about the development process, watch portions of interviews with other developers, and be a part of DF's remarkable bounce back from their pretty serious sounding financial situation.

I'll definitely be backing any future DF Kickstarter projects with a fury.

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While I like inventory puzzles, one of the things that I always found off-putting about some bad puzzle design is: pick up item X on the third screen, because you can; OK, halfway through the game, I finally get to the screen where I can use this item to solve this puzzle. This was the second worst thing about some adventure games, next to pixel hunting. It takes me out of the game just picking up a random, dirty sock, just because it's there. I'm sure some people hate backtracking, but I like realizing, "oh, I saw something I could use in the other room."

It's also nice having puzzles that aren't inventory, or at least inventory use, based. A good example are some of the puzzles in Fez, even though they are repetitive. You have environmental clues, as well as inventory clues, that help you solve the puzzles.

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I know it is probably redundant to say, but watching this process is more than worth the price of admission. I feel like the adventure is us. Double Fine, you guys and gals. Double fine.

/agree

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I hope when the game is out, we can see the contents of the mysterious notebook that helped build the game!

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another great video and the idea seems really neat! tim seems to be fretting more about what "is expected" than Id have though - DONT WORRY! make something you like and we ll probably like it too!

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Argh, too many comments to read through them all right now! Apologies if I'm recycling somebody's opinions here:

I think puzzles are absolutely VITAL to the flow of adventure games. Just to slow you down a bit, make you poke around more than you otherwise might. If you don't provide people with a little bit of friction, the tendency is to bolt down all the content too quickly, and that will give you indigestion. The puzzles don't need to be difficult, they just need to be enough to make you explore your environment thoroughly, which I think is where the real pleasure of an adventure game is.

I think Jakub Dvorsky was right on the money when he said that it's important that the environment should fun to poke around in, like a toy. I firmly believe this is the way to go. To this end I recommend that everybody should ignore what the Superbrothers guy says, and instead go and play WINDOSILL immediately, if you haven't already.

Or even if you have, because it's still fun to poke around in. Like a toy.

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To be honest, I really was in it mostly for the documentary. There aren't enough documentaries on the production of video games. There's the one about Indie Games, this, and that's it! Wanting to go into "the bizz", I wanted in. Plus getting a new classic Adventure Game sweetened the deal.

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