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Moral Choice?

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So, I just finished The Walking Dead Episode 2, and wow. That was the most powerful game I've ever played. Its true moral choice rather than the black and white nonsense we get in other games with the system.

But I was thinking about DFA, and what if it had a similar system? Its a coming of age tale right? So how about the ability to shape their futures, and see how they grow up and adapt to the world around them. A true moral choice system, with no clear right or wrong options and no easy answer.

I don't think any of us know what Tim has in mind for the story, maybe its already too late to think about something like that, but if it can make a game about zombies that powerful just think what it can do for a coming of age tale about young people trying to find their place in the world. What do you guys think?

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I really like moral systems in games like fallout, but i don't think adventures are the right type of game for such a thing though.

It may have great potential - especially in terms of re-playing motivation - but it seems kind of odd and a hell lot of work with a lot of risk. Not the kind of experiment i would like to see in "the first real adventure since decades" (at least on my terms of definition).

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I think morality in games or game choices is an interesting and still underdeveloped field, and The Walking Dead is an interesting if flawed attempt at it.* But I definitely think that sort of more serious endeavour isn't suited to the tone of Schafer's work.

*For one thing it seems like Telltale have some sort of internal competition to see who can make the worst control system. My other complaint is that choices aren't always intelligible; two or three times over the two episodes I made dialogue choices, for instance, that turned out to be rather different from how I construed them. The likeliness of this problem occurring is compounded by our lack of information about the main character's backstory - it isn't always entirely possible to tell what answer in a conversation is misleading to the point of untruth when you don't actually know what the real answer is.

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So, I just finished The Walking Dead Episode 2, and wow. That was the most powerful game I've ever played.

Is this an overstatement? I haven't played it yet since I'm waiting for the price to drop (Telltale games usually go on sale after half a year or so) but from the reviews I've read, the game is "good ut not great".

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So, I just finished The Walking Dead Episode 2, and wow. That was the most powerful game I've ever played.

Is this an overstatement? I haven't played it yet since I'm waiting for the price to drop (Telltale games usually go on sale after half a year or so) but from the reviews I've read, the game is "good ut not great".

It is easily the best adventure game I have played in the last 5 or so years, and the second episode kicked things up a notch. Definitely one of the most emotional experiences I've had playing a game in a while.

Telltale just gets a lot of reviewers downgrading their games a lot for things that are tropes of the adventure genre. If I read another review where someone complains about lack of replayability...

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It's worth playing, and games that try something interesting should be encouraged, but you're better off playing Heavy Rain.

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I recently finished Resonance, and it has a great moral choice at the end (amazing adventure game in general, too) - it's a bitter-sweet grey area, and both choices give the game a more powerful ending versus the "Good guys win! Everyone lives happily ever after!" trope. The only other adventure game I've come across that gives you hard moral choices that affect the story a bit is I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream - another excellent and disturbing game. Moral choices make me feel more concerned about the characters, and gives them depth - let alone giving the game some replayability.

That said, given DF's allotted production time, I doubt the game will be very dynamic. Just give me one good choice, and I'll be happy.

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Isn't it better then to have like a clear Yes or No stand point to rather have a series of tasks you need to do and you get to choose what you want to do first.

Maybe you'll get a little bit of a comment based on the order you chose to do things. But the budget for this game is way too small to actually add a lot of consequence for your actions. I personally think that adventure games should be more or less the closest thing to a movie as you could be on the time they come out, so when you are done playing you "have lived" the movie and also tell others why they should/- not pick it up, based on the knowledge of what they are going to get.

Adventure games can have bad controls, because there aren't consequences for failing if any at all.

Grim, (as an example,) doesn't have the best game play, but that doesn't matter because you have all the time in the world to move your character around. If you had people following you around to sprout you all the time and you we're constantly colliding with a wall that lead you to turn around and run back towards your death. You can live with it, (that's the point.)

And then there is the reason why I probably won't pick up Walking Dead: Quicktime events, just for the hell of it. How can I care about the characters in a game if I'm constantly on edge getting ready for a button prompt?

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Moral choices as presented in the Walking Dead games are only interested if the story branches at some point at reflects the players' decision. I haven't read up on all the threads here but I'm not sure if REDS will feature a branching storyline and thus will be suitable for any kind of moral choices.

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So, I just finished The Walking Dead Episode 2, and wow. That was the most powerful game I've ever played. Its true moral choice rather than the black and white nonsense we get in other games with the system.

It is easily the best adventure game I have played in the last 5 or so years, and the second episode kicked things up a notch. Definitely one of the most emotional experiences I've had playing a game in a while.

So my wallet gave in to the pressure and I got the game. And I can't say I'm the least bit disappointed. I mean, wow. This is truly a cinematic game done right.

Still, I don't think these are gameplay elements that should be included in DFA. If so, it should be a single choice near the end of the game, like in King's Quest VII.

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I like the way choices were handled by the original Deus Ex.

There was no clear 'good' or 'bad', there were many agendas and ideologies going on, your actions were going to please some, hurt some, anger some. Often the decisions were not moral decisions at all, but they still changed the game. Many decisions turned out to be moral without you realising it, many put your past decisions in a new context giving you regret.

The way the games dialogue and options changed in small ways made all this feel very real to the player. All while being quite linear in the overall plot, it still felt you were guiding a participant in a story rather than simply the person who pushed the 'go' button on completely linear game and story progress.

[Edit]

So, I just finished The Walking Dead Episode 2, and wow. That was the most powerful game I've ever played. Its true moral choice rather than the black and white nonsense we get in other games with the system.

It is easily the best adventure game I have played in the last 5 or so years, and the second episode kicked things up a notch. Definitely one of the most emotional experiences I've had playing a game in a while.

So my wallet gave in to the pressure and I got the game. And I can't say I'm the least bit disappointed. I mean, wow. This is truly a cinematic game done right.

Still, I don't think these are gameplay elements that should be included in DFA. If so, it should be a single choice near the end of the game, like in King's Quest VII.

Wow, I will definitely have to check this game out then!

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