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slagathor

Day of the Tentacle intro in CG

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(Please watch in full screen and HD!)

Hi all. So I found myself with some spare time since work has been kind of dry lately, so I needed a project to occupy myself with, and also to show off my skills as a 3D guy and compositor. Here, I offer up the fruits of my toiling. It's not entirely complete, as there are one or 2 quirks that I need to iron out, but all the same, I wanted to show it off, and I thought that there could be no better community to give the premiere screening to.

Those little errors will be fixed, so this video is set to 'unlisted', but in the meantime, I hope this gives you some entertainment over the weekend whilst we await the next episode of the documentary.

As for me, I'm going off the grid over the weekend to drink waaaaay too much!

EDIT: The version above is the completed version. If you want to see the older WIP version, it is

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Cool, but if you wanted to just show it to backers you should put it in the general discussion forum - this one is to talk specifically about things related to the game. The best place for it is the Fan Art forum, but that's not really possible if you don't want to share it out yet. Just a heads up in case you want to post anything else.

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Very cool. Only constructive criticism I have is that the gag of the giant squid that is actually two stand alone tentacles doesn't come through as well with so few trees.

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That's fantastic!

I particularly loved the transformation part, thanks for sharing it early.

Maybe 3D point-and-click adventure games can have a future :)

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Whoops, sorry about the wrong forum posting. I had about 5 minutes to make the post since I was about to go away for the weekend, so next time I shall be more careful. If a mod feels that this thread should be moved, then I'm certainly happy with that.

Thanks for the feedback guys!

Only constructive criticism I have is that the gag of the giant squid that is actually two stand alone tentacles doesn't come through as well with so few trees.

Mmm, yeah, I agree. The thing about undertaking a project such as this is that you eventually reach a point where you just want to finish and live with a few little niggles. Perhaps if I'd had a team of dedicated CG artists, we could have gotten everything perfect.

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Maybe 3D point-and-click adventure games can have a future :)

You know, I've seen plenty of 3D adventure games, and the thing that strikes me is that the engine running those games seem to be several years behind the rest of the industry. I don't mean that to sound derogatory, but it's been clear for many years now that the tech available can produce some amazing visuals. But I understand that if a programmer has been working in 2D for a long time, and then has to learn how to program for a 3D experience with a shipping deadline firmly in place, of course there will be limitations.

Adventure games have a more controlled experience, by which I mean that the number of player variables are probably considerably lower than, say, an FPS, so I'm guessing that it's less difficult to direct the player's attention to a particular event. Meaning that it would be easier to leverage processing from the GPU and RAM for specific things that will appear on screen, and not have to process a massive particle effect in case the player whips their view around to see it. Unlike Call of Duty, which has explosions and bullet tracers and dozens of actors, post-processing anti-aliasing, volumetric lights & shadows, bloom, ad infinitum...

All that being said, there's something elegant about a 2D environment that just works for adventuring, and I think it was exactly the right choice for Reds.

Getting back to 3D adventure games, though, I generally like what Telltale are doing -- I haven't played Walking Dead yet, but I understand that they're really doing some great things there. Personally, were I to design a 3D adventure game, I might be inclined limit the player's ability to move the camera (and I don't know that I like moving a character with a control pad or WASD in an adventure)... Maybe a game that runs more or less with a SCUMM kind of interface, but in a fully 3D environment, and the camera would only move to transition from one 'screen' to another, or a during cutscene, or to direct a player's attention.

Also, I think that an adventure game in a 3D engine should utilise that extra dimension. I can't offer up a decent example, but surely it can create opportunities for some great puzzles, rather than 'action' sequences.

But I don't design games, so maybe there are some excellent reasons why that wouldn't work.

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Maybe 3D point-and-click adventure games can have a future :)

You know, I've seen plenty of 3D adventure games, and the thing that strikes me is that the engine running those games seem to be several years behind the rest of the industry. I don't mean that to sound derogatory, but it's been clear for many years now that the tech available can produce some amazing visuals. But I understand that if a programmer has been working in 2D for a long time, and then has to learn how to program for a 3D experience with a shipping deadline firmly in place, of course there will be limitations.

I agree with you. Part of the reason you see old engines is the fact that the games are old and yes, part of it comes from, as you said, the difficult transition from 2D to 3D.

All that being said, there's something elegant about a 2D environment that just works for adventuring, and I think it was exactly the right choice for Reds.

Right, you can get 3D-like effects in that environment, in fact I see a lot of it is being done in Reds. I remember the days Sierra had a details slider where you can lower the game details and animations for slower computers, so I'm really hoping/supporting DF would use a similar technique, allowing a PC to use all its processing capabilities, and reducing the details on platforms that are less cpu/gpu capable.

Getting back to 3D adventure games, though, I generally like what Telltale are doing -- I haven't played Walking Dead yet, but I understand that they're really doing some great things there. Personally, were I to design a 3D adventure game, I might be inclined limit the player's ability to move the camera (and I don't know that I like moving a character with a control pad or WASD in an adventure)... Maybe a game that runs more or less with a SCUMM kind of interface, but in a fully 3D environment, and the camera would only move to transition from one 'screen' to another, or a during cutscene, or to direct a player's attention.

Yes, some 3D adventure games have done exactly that. However, adventure games never really had enough time with this tech to find the right standards. Cutscenes were also created in the past, but usually as a pre-render.

Also, I think that an adventure game in a 3D engine should utilise that extra dimension. I can't offer up a decent example, but surely it can create opportunities for some great puzzles, rather than 'action' sequences.

2D adventure games can mimic this by creating separate rooms/environments for different angles. Most of what I've seen depend on the player position (for example, players goes to the bottom of the screen and can see the wall that was not visible before or zoom out and see a larger environment to navigate).

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A 'making of'....

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Okay, so it mostly focuses on animation and compositing, but I guess these were the main things I was intending to show off here anyway :)

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