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Levering_2pp

Making the Episode

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Actually, if you watch this video: http://www.doublefine.com/forums/viewthread/6843/

Tim explains how it is important to be as transparent as possible, but to not spoil the story. That way, people that want to watch / be a part of the developmental process can also enjoy the story and puzzles fully when the game is released.

I think I'd forgotten about that video but sometimes kinda wish that there was a little less worriment on spoilers or a video or two with a spoiler warning where those interested could see further insight into where the ideas are going. It's still early though, so maybe there won't be anything to worry about.

Just thinking about projects that I've done for work I know that some ideas don't make the cut and I'm interested in those ideas too. I wonder if there'll be a way to see those ideas too...

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Thanks for that very informative post!

Does Final Cut Pro 7 work reliable and stable for you?

The reason I'm asking is that you seem to have a ton of video material and in our company we've only had problems with big FCP projects.

The bigger the projects got the more often the application crashed. Sometimes even every 5 minutes or so.

We're on Avid now. Compared to FCP it's only have the fun to work with but at least it's rock-solid.

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Thanks for the post, very interesting read.

You are doing a great job on the documentary - actually your work alone is worth my kickstarter pledge, the game is just a bonus at this point. Just try to keep us more in the loop on the status of the next episode. I think most people fully understand if something takes a little longer than expected, it just can be a little frustrating to visit the site every day expecting a new episode and getting nothing. So just a little: "we are still working on the post processing, we are aiming to release it on the XX, but bare with us if we can`t make that date".

But all in all, just continue doing what youre doing.

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Thank you for giving us insight into your workflow, this has been helpful for me. My primary job is that I'm the sole video producer/editor/co-writer/etc for a major nonprofit and I'm always looking to learn more. I have a lot of questions if you (any of you) have time.

1) How do you backup your main archive? I use a 12TB OWC external with Raid5 (so, 9TB of actual storage): http://eshop.macsales.com/shop/hard-drives/RAID/Desktop/

I not only use this drive for storage, but I work from it as well. The nonprofit didn't have enough money to invest into more drives (yet), so I'm having to back up the 9 TB using several different external drives we already owned using time machine on my mac. I know there are more elegant solutions out there and I'm curious what you all do/do you have any advice for backing up large drives like these?

2) What do you use for compression on your archive? I never messed with compression as I need access to all the footage we have, at least the way we operate right now. But, compression could be very useful in the future.

3) Do you own all your equipment? If so, do you have preferred vendors? If you rent, preferred rental houses? (I'd guess you rent local unless we're talking about physically small things that can be shipped, like lenses)

4) Do you always shoot dual system? When you do, how do you handle slating and syncing? Very lastly, do you always have on every shoot a dedicated person handling sound?

5) What's your favorite snack? I like kettle chips.

Sorry for the 20 questions. I'm more of a narrative filmmaker, so the documentary filmmaking is fairly new to me still. Any questions answered at all are appreciated.

Looking forward to the next episode :)

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That's all so interesting! I hope you guys dedicate an episode for yourselves! It would be so fun to watch how it's all done!

Thanks! Keep at doing what your doing! You Rock!

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Nice insight into the workflow that goes into carving the solid documentary we get see every month.

Knowing how long #4 will be it's impressive how much footage you must have shot.

This is a groundbreaking documentary but what kind of awards can your finalized project be submitted for when it's wrapped?

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This was super interesting, thanks for the post. Backing this project is basically giving me a complete crash course in how to make things. I like it.

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Good read!

Have you looked into some sort of cloud storage/backup to automize some of the upload/download work?

When the episodes have specific themes, does this mean that some of the content will appear randomly in the series?

i.e. something recorded back in march being more suited to a later episode.

When you are closing in towards the end of the doc and pretty much have all the content recorded, are there any plans of reorganizing the footage into something more like a long doc?

I.e the credits could be cut out from the majority of the episodes on the Blu-Ray/DVD to save space and add flow.

Or something at some point in the future something can happen that would actually add to the theme of a previous episode, and it would be sad if that would just be left and forgotten, because of the episodes being locked down. (I guess these things could also be included as bonus features...)

Again awesome stuff! =)

Cloud storage would be too expensive for the amounts of data we're dealing with. Double Fine's ftp works great for sending batches of information back and forth.

We're always keeping track of events that happened earlier potentially paying off in future episodes. You'll see some of that in episode 4.

Making a feature cut is something that comes up pretty often, we're still thinking about it. If it did happen it seems like we would have to cut out an awful lot of content to make it a reasonable run time. Just going to have to see how the project goes and if that's a good fit in the end. As for going back to alter older episodes, that's something to consider. It's part of the reason I don't want to circulate the episodes until after the whole series is done.

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Thanks for the detailed post! Great read.

I hope that will shut the malcontents but probably it's just wishful thinking :] After all we all know even kids in kindergarten can operate a camera in a telephone, right? :]

Questions:

Do you plan to take any holidays during the filming or will you keep this pace and work organisation until the end?

What about the interns helping you? Did you assign them with numbers or maybe they have some names? Are they staying here for all the development or just until shooting the scenes with the explosives for the next episode? :D

We stagger our vacations so they don't impact the workflow too much.

Our interns are Marc and Phil, and you may seem them here on the forums at some point. Marc will be with us for as long as he needs to be, while Phil will be leaving in September.

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I'm curious, 2PP--what brand of tripod do you guys use?

Is there a particular brand you like?

I'd like to do some videography at some point, so I thought I'd ask.

We're using Manfrotto right now, and i have to say they have kind of been falling apart. I like the action of the heads but the leg clamps on both of them are cracking and they tend to droop at times. Granted one of them has gone across the world, but the second one we bought has lived in San Francisco and it's doing the same thing.

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Good read. Thanks.

Although it does appear to be the (very good) reason for the Minecraft Documentary being delayed.

The Minecraft movie actually ran into delays for reasons beyond our control. Having to balance the two projects is difficult but we're making good progress on getting the movie finished.

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btw, why do you use such a narrow focal plane? ive noticed that it has become extremely popular for modern documentaries to do that. indie game: the movie did just that.

It's partially aesthetic and partially technical. Our primary lens are very fast, f/0.95. We need fast lenses for low light performance in the office (anything more than f2.0 is too slow) but the other side of that is they have very shallow focus. It can be aesthetically pleasing in interviews to break the subject out from a bland background, but around the office when you're dealing with people moving around it can be challenging.

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Thanks for that very informative post!

Does Final Cut Pro 7 work reliable and stable for you?

The reason I'm asking is that you seem to have a ton of video material and in our company we've only had problems with big FCP projects.

The bigger the projects got the more often the application crashed. Sometimes even every 5 minutes or so.

We're on Avid now. Compared to FCP it's only have the fun to work with but at least it's rock-solid.

Yeah it seems to fall apart when you're working on a complex feature length project. We've been breaking the Minecraft feature into chunks so no single sequence runs for too long. For the DFA it's been working fine. I have FCPX crash on occasion as well but at least it saves everything all the time.

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Thank you for giving us insight into your workflow, this has been helpful for me. My primary job is that I'm the sole video producer/editor/co-writer/etc for a major nonprofit and I'm always looking to learn more. I have a lot of questions if you (any of you) have time.

1) How do you backup your main archive? I use a 12TB OWC external with Raid5 (so, 9TB of actual storage): http://eshop.macsales.com/shop/hard-drives/RAID/Desktop/

I not only use this drive for storage, but I work from it as well. The nonprofit didn't have enough money to invest into more drives (yet), so I'm having to back up the 9 TB using several different external drives we already owned using time machine on my mac. I know there are more elegant solutions out there and I'm curious what you all do/do you have any advice for backing up large drives like these?

2) What do you use for compression on your archive? I never messed with compression as I need access to all the footage we have, at least the way we operate right now. But, compression could be very useful in the future.

3) Do you own all your equipment? If so, do you have preferred vendors? If you rent, preferred rental houses? (I'd guess you rent local unless we're talking about physically small things that can be shipped, like lenses)

4) Do you always shoot dual system? When you do, how do you handle slating and syncing? Very lastly, do you always have on every shoot a dedicated person handling sound?

5) What's your favorite snack? I like kettle chips.

Sorry for the 20 questions. I'm more of a narrative filmmaker, so the documentary filmmaking is fairly new to me still. Any questions answered at all are appreciated.

Looking forward to the next episode :)

1) We use the Drobo for storage and work off the Pegasus. Both are very secure and contain full backups of all the master cards we shoot, but i still backup all the cards again on smaller drives. We're basically in the same situation. I would recommend not working off of your main backup drive though, editing is rough on drive health.

2) Our card backups are already compressed and we leave them that way on the Drobo, they only get decompressed on the Thunderbolt drive. I've never looked into compression for archiving, i would feel better leaving the data as it is.

3) We own everything, and we use B&H for most of our purchases. Adorama is good too.

4) We just do a clap at the end of a take, nothing very complex. Line up the audio in post. FCPX does a great job of syncing tracks automatically, and you can also use plug-ins to help with that in FCP7. We always have a sound person too, getting good sound and video at the same time would be extremely difficult.

5) Fresh popcorn is great editing food, invest in an air popper.

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This is a groundbreaking documentary but what kind of awards can your finalized project be submitted for when it's wrapped?

I really don't know. It's enough if you guys like it.

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So, I guess everyone is happy now. I didn't read it yet, but it's really, really nice. You must be really busy. Well, the members of Reds are busy too, but you have to make a short movie every month and that is just this project, I know you have others.

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btw, why do you use such a narrow focal plane? ive noticed that it has become extremely popular for modern documentaries to do that. indie game: the movie did just that.

It's partially aesthetic and partially technical. Our primary lens are very fast, f/0.95. We need fast lenses for low light performance in the office (anything more than f2.0 is too slow) but the other side of that is they have very shallow focus. It can be aesthetically pleasing in interviews to break the subject out from a bland background, but around the office when you're dealing with people moving around it can be challenging.

so the fact that it seemed to get in the way of sidequest videos is just a result of of the low light performance, i get it now. thanks for the answer :).

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1) We use the Drobo for storage and work off the Pegasus. Both are very secure and contain full backups of all the master cards we shoot, but i still backup all the cards again on smaller drives. We’re basically in the same situation. I would recommend not working off of your main backup drive though, editing is rough on drive health.

2) Our card backups are already compressed and we leave them that way on the Drobo, they only get decompressed on the Thunderbolt drive. I’ve never looked into compression for archiving, i would feel better leaving the data as it is.

3) We own everything, and we use B&H for most of our purchases. Adorama is good too.

4) We just do a clap at the end of a take, nothing very complex. Line up the audio in post. FCPX does a great job of syncing tracks automatically, and you can also use plug-ins to help with that in FCP7. We always have a sound person too, getting good sound and video at the same time would be extremely difficult.

5) Fresh popcorn is great editing food, invest in an air popper.

Awesome, thank you so much for answering all my questions. I'll push for them to get a separate work drive.

One last follow up (well, a few), this is a question for you (Paul), what are your thoughts on FCPX? Especially since you're dealing with edits between FCPX and FPC7? Do you see FCPX being worth the ultimate migration over to and is it worth it?

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Awesome, thank you so much for answering all my questions. I'll push for them to get a separate work drive.

One last follow up (well, a few), this is a question for you (Paul), what are your thoughts on FCPX? Especially since you're dealing with edits between FCPX and FPC7? Do you see FCPX being worth the ultimate migration over to and is it worth it?

Like any new program it was weird at first but i've been getting use to it. Now it feels strange to go back to 7. It does seem more demanding on the system, so if you have an older Mac the performance could be poor. I've yet to try the 7 to X migration tool as well, we're just running both programs on most of the workstations.

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Like any new program it was weird at first but i’ve been getting use to it. Now it feels strange to go back to 7. It does seem more demanding on the system, so if you have an older Mac the performance could be poor. I’ve yet to try the 7 to X migration tool as well, we’re just running both programs on most of the workstations.

I upgraded to a Macbook Pro last year, so I'd hope that's enough? I'll see about getting it, I would've already but I believe to use FCPX you have to have Lion installed (I have snow leopard)...now that Mountain Lion just came out, might be worth the switch. You're the first professional I've heard of using FCPX on a major production such as this, most of the people here in Nashville have either stuck with FCP7 or switched to Avid. I would've switched to premiere, but FCP7 handles markers much better and those are pretty much a deal breaker for me when it comes to organizing documentary footage.

Thanks again for all your comments, they are very helpful. Best of luck with the rest of the series.

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Yo Dawg! We heard you liked behind the scenes content, so we made some behind the scenes content on the making of the behind the scenes content, so you can imagine what it's like to be behind the behind the scenes of the actual content while you mess around with the content itself.

... had to...

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Hey Paul,

Thanks for posting! I just wanted to duck in and say I think you guys are doing an incredible job! Thanks for all your hard work with the doc - my mom now thinks I'm a movie star and I've only popped up once or twice in the background

Thanks again!

Dan

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I know nothing about cameras, video capture, lighting, or anything in this article. However, I still found it absolutely fascinating. Thank you for this share!

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That was an interesting read, thanks a lot. Love to read behind the scenes info like this.

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