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DF Chris Remo

Episode 5: It's Gonna Get Hairy

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I wish I'd bought the $30 tier now... the music's been brilliant so far. Really want the soundtrack :(

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A very informative series so far, as a player you never see this side of game production so goodluck with producing the rest of the game. I look forward to seeing how things develop.

I'm curious though, seeing the issues between imaginitive ideas, development and budget. How did Tim imagine the game would evolve if double fine only received the amount asked for originally (400k)? That is regarding music, art, story, etc.

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I wish I'd bought the $30 tier now... the music's been brilliant so far. Really want the soundtrack :(

Keep an eye on Terence's web site. He might sell it himself.

Seth B

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I wish I'd bought the $30 tier now... the music's been brilliant so far. Really want the soundtrack :(

Keep an eye on Terence's web site. He might sell it himself.

Seth B

So he did the music for Dustforce. Some of those tracks are really similar to the music in these episodes, so I already thought he did. :)

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Can't believe it's been a month. According to the documentary status thread, editing on episode 6 is nearly complete. Maybe it'll arrive in a week or two. Can't wait to see what's been cooking!

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Can't believe it's been a month. According to the documentary status thread, editing on episode 6 is nearly complete. Maybe it'll arrive in a week or two. Can't wait to see what's been cooking!
Episode 6 is almost done. Should be launching next week!

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Sweet! I should have read the previous posts.

And just to clarify, my "Can't believe it's been a month" comment wasn't one of impatience, but just an observation that time has flown by despite seeming like just last week episode 5 came out. The documentaries have been really great!

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I'm really hoping that Episode 6 will pick up after 5 left off. It ended with a lot of tension; which is great for storytelling but it does lead to a very nervous month.

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Yeah, this documentary really is the Anti-Indie Game: The Movie, which should not be taken seriously by anyone hoping to go into game development. That film caters to the idea that "video games are not a business"/"It's all about the art"/"indie gamers are the only good guys ever to exist ever". It's not a documentary about making video games, it's a documentary about naive idealism in a very technically difficult and money-run industry.

With all due respect I have to disagree. IG:TM is about passionate people doing passionate work, which is extremely difficult in any field. The film doesn't sugar coat that at all, IMO. I'm also not sure where the film communicated "video games are not a business" to you - I felt there was a great deal of "business" content, if you will. We see Team Meat hurrying to meat a deadline so they can be in a sale, worrying about their visibility on the market place, and we see Phil Fish go crazy from worry due to legal difficulties in the middle of preparing for PAX, an important part of their marketing strategy, not to mention the things that just get mentioned (presumably because they aren't interesting to film) such as Team Meat's difficulties communicating with Microsoft and Ploytron losing their funding from the Canadian government (I believe this happened before filming began). These small teams have to deal all the same business problems of a larger company, just on a smaller scale. They have to balance dealing with that with the actual act of creation, which is no different for independent game developers than it is for independent film makers or anyone else doing what I guess you could call "freelance" work. I thought the movie did a fine job showing that.

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Yeah, this documentary really is the Anti-Indie Game: The Movie, which should not be taken seriously by anyone hoping to go into game development. That film caters to the idea that "video games are not a business"/"It's all about the art"/"indie gamers are the only good guys ever to exist ever". It's not a documentary about making video games, it's a documentary about naive idealism in a very technically difficult and money-run industry.

With all due respect I have to disagree. IG:TM is about passionate people doing passionate work, which is extremely difficult in any field. The film doesn't sugar coat that at all, IMO. I'm also not sure where the film communicated "video games are not a business" to you - I felt there was a great deal of "business" content, if you will. We see Team Meat hurrying to meat a deadline so they can be in a sale, worrying about their visibility on the market place, and we see Phil Fish go crazy from worry due to legal difficulties in the middle of preparing for PAX, an important part of their marketing strategy, not to mention the things that just get mentioned (presumably because they aren't interesting to film) such as Team Meat's difficulties communicating with Microsoft and Ploytron losing their funding from the Canadian government (I believe this happened before filming began). These small teams have to deal all the same business problems of a larger company, just on a smaller scale. They have to balance dealing with that with the actual act of creation, which is no different for independent game developers than it is for independent film makers or anyone else doing what I guess you could call "freelance" work. I thought the movie did a fine job showing that.

Moreover, I think most of the people who were in that made successful games. So whether or not they were naive, their games made money, in the end. And so do a lot of indies. And the good thing about the indie space is that there is room in it for people who aren't necessarily chasing the maximum profit route. It runs the gamut from people just tinkering in their spare time to people who have already released big successes and have a lot of freedom because of it. And people who don't make games full time right now but may do so in future. IG:TM may not be an unrealistic look at the indie game industry, rather just a fairly specific one that doesn't cover all these bases, instead focusing on a few stories, from my understanding (I haven't been able to see all of it yet)

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Yeah, this documentary really is the Anti-Indie Game: The Movie, which should not be taken seriously by anyone hoping to go into game development. That film caters to the idea that "video games are not a business"/"It's all about the art"/"indie gamers are the only good guys ever to exist ever". It's not a documentary about making video games, it's a documentary about naive idealism in a very technically difficult and money-run industry.

With all due respect I have to disagree. IG:TM is about passionate people doing passionate work, which is extremely difficult in any field. The film doesn't sugar coat that at all, IMO. I'm also not sure where the film communicated "video games are not a business" to you - I felt there was a great deal of "business" content, if you will. We see Team Meat hurrying to meat a deadline so they can be in a sale, worrying about their visibility on the market place, and we see Phil Fish go crazy from worry due to legal difficulties in the middle of preparing for PAX, an important part of their marketing strategy, not to mention the things that just get mentioned (presumably because they aren't interesting to film) such as Team Meat's difficulties communicating with Microsoft and Ploytron losing their funding from the Canadian government (I believe this happened before filming began). These small teams have to deal all the same business problems of a larger company, just on a smaller scale. They have to balance dealing with that with the actual act of creation, which is no different for independent game developers than it is for independent film makers or anyone else doing what I guess you could call "freelance" work. I thought the movie did a fine job showing that.

Moreover, I think most of the people who were in that made successful games. So whether or not they were naive, their games made money, in the end. And so do a lot of indies. And the good thing about the indie space is that there is room in it for people who aren't necessarily chasing the maximum profit route. It runs the gamut from people just tinkering in their spare time to people who have already released big successes and have a lot of freedom because of it. And people who don't make games full time right now but may do so in future. IG:TM may not be an unrealistic look at the indie game industry, rather just a fairly specific one that doesn't cover all these bases, instead focusing on a few stories, from my understanding (I haven't been able to see all of it yet)

I may be just a bit biased, being a backer for IG:TM, but the movie was originally going to focus on a bunch of indie devs talking about their project, small to big, the Team Meats to the "Project Zomboid"'s. It was originally going to be a documentary exposing this little known culture thats hidden behind "Green Space Marine 4" and "Shooty Gun Guy". Later, when they looked at some of the footage, they decided instead of this insane spread of one developer to another, to another, to another, no connecting story other than "I like to make games", they decided to focus down on Team Meat, Phil Fish, and Jon Blow.

Jon Blow was already a success, and they were planning on using him as a counterpart to FEZ or Super Meat Boy if either one of them failed, which everyone involved in the film now jokes that one of them should have, as it would have made a better movie, but they were not expecting SMB to be a success, and the film ends just before FEZ came out, which is also a success.

The glamorization of the "big indie" in the movie was completely accidental. When SMB was a success, they flew out to see Edmund again to film some ending stuff, but the whole movie really was about the passion of these people, and the love, and the detail, and the blood, sweat, and tears that go into making something like a independent game that many wouldn't know about.

I personally see it as a film exploring passion of people, and why they make games, and a perfect example of games as an artform.

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*sigh* the wait is killing me, obviously they've worked it out since last episode right? I mean production IS still moving along... ^__^ *fingers crossed* hope Episode 6 drops this week.

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Yeah, this documentary really is the Anti-Indie Game: The Movie, which should not be taken seriously by anyone hoping to go into game development. That film caters to the idea that "video games are not a business"/"It's all about the art"/"indie gamers are the only good guys ever to exist ever". It's not a documentary about making video games, it's a documentary about naive idealism in a very technically difficult and money-run industry.

With all due respect I have to disagree. IG:TM is about passionate people doing passionate work, which is extremely difficult in any field. The film doesn't sugar coat that at all, IMO. I'm also not sure where the film communicated "video games are not a business" to you - I felt there was a great deal of "business" content, if you will. We see Team Meat hurrying to meat a deadline so they can be in a sale, worrying about their visibility on the market place, and we see Phil Fish go crazy from worry due to legal difficulties in the middle of preparing for PAX, an important part of their marketing strategy, not to mention the things that just get mentioned (presumably because they aren't interesting to film) such as Team Meat's difficulties communicating with Microsoft and Ploytron losing their funding from the Canadian government (I believe this happened before filming began). These small teams have to deal all the same business problems of a larger company, just on a smaller scale. They have to balance dealing with that with the actual act of creation, which is no different for independent game developers than it is for independent film makers or anyone else doing what I guess you could call "freelance" work. I thought the movie did a fine job showing that.

I'd have a bit more respect for IG:TM if there was a narrative. There was nothing anchoring me to care about these people. It wasn't about their story, for as much as it had them just talking to the camera about their art.

And I'm not sure if they made blow out to look like a blowhard or if that was just him.

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Amazing! How about a piece of making-of the process of transforming the 2D characters in 3D and animating all this?.. That'd be awesome!

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Just rewatching this one.

"2001 would be hard to do without a great big orchestra, and I don't think we have that"

HAH! Shows what HE knew :D

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