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Atkinson_2pp

Sidequest: "I Would Have Absolutely Laughed"

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Heck yes! c64 all the way, and the 386 then on to text games in C++, then using Blender and getting work shown at Siggraph 2000 so much in common. Oliver you rock!

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I really enjoyed this. Long ago I started a project to add voice to the first two Monkey Island games, with some other guys. It was called E.A.R.W.A.C.S. We used scummvm and had a working prototyope, but never released it. My main motivation was to make the games more accessible to my niece who was too young to read at the time.

A few guys on the team were German. There's a lot of love for Adventure Games in Europe.

I'm glad Oliver was at Double Fine so that the Secret of Monkey Island Special Editions could be made. They are basically what were we working towards, only more ambitious, and legal.

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Wow, I just realized that we were close to getting to know each other as I also did work in computer graphics research with Oliver Deussen. I just finished my PhD under his supervision at the University of Konstanz (although you two worked in Dresden together it seems). And I'll actually have a presentation at SIGGRAPH this year.

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Wow, I just realized that we were close to getting to know each other as I also did work in computer graphics research with Oliver Deussen. I just finished my PhD under his supervision at the University of Konstanz (although you two worked in Dresden together it seems). And I'll actually have a presentation at SIGGRAPH this year.

Congratulations dude! Getting a technical paper accepted at SIGGRAPH is a huge accomplishment!

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Hey, loved that episode. There were some very interesting stories. I'm from West Germany myself (although it isn't called that anymore of course) but that's still close engough to be excited to hear your stories, Oliver. So, greeting from almost home. ;-)

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Hello Oliver,

great sidequest and what i really did enjoy was....

TADA: The bottle of "Flaschbier" besides your Monitor :-)

Na ? Werner Fan ? ;-)

And for saving your precious Data from your old KC, i am not sure if this would work for you

but i have bought this http://www.luigidifraia.com/c64/dc2n/index.html a while ago

to save my C64 programms which were still stored on tape. (Who really had the cash for a discdrive those days) ?

- even after more than 20 Years ! The data was still stored and retrievable on my tapes.

and now i have my first attempts in Basic and Assembler,programmed in the late 80s, on SD card ,ready to use in Vice.

i think you probably know this site allready : http://www.iee.et.tu-dresden.de/~kc-club/index.html

Best regards from Darmstadt, Germany,

Anton

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Great sidequest, I really enjoyed it!

I'm from Hungary, so good old memories came up about the Eastern Europe things. Black and white Junost TV, we still got it home... Maybe you heard about hungarian company, Videoton. My uncle worked there and got us the Pong clone part-by-part from the factory, then built it for us and we played it on the Junost :) Controller was in a soap dish!

Cassette games on ZX Spectrum in the early '90s, Horace was our "star".

Turbo button, ha-ha-ha! :D

I'm a programmer too, so I always enjoy episodes, updates like this. The career milestones soo true, I worked half year for free while I wrote my thesis, but I won't regret it, learned much and I'm working still there in full time.

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Thanks Anton for the link to the tape-restoration device, I'll check it out.

And thanks to all of you guys for being so nice! :)

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Another great Sidequest! 2pp - If you ever run out of Broken Age team members, feel free to keep going with the rest of the DF staff!

Cassette games on ZX Spectrum in the early '90s, Horace was our "star".

Hooray for ZX Speccy fans! For me, it was during the mid '80s - Horace, Jet Set Willy, Fairlight, Underwurlde and so many more...!

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Great sidequest, I really enjoyed it!

I'm from Hungary, so good old memories came up about the Eastern Europe things. Black and white Junost TV, we still got it home... Maybe you heard about hungarian company, Videoton. My uncle worked there and got us the Pong clone part-by-part from the factory, then built it for us and we played it on the Junost :) Controller was in a soap dish!

Cassette games on ZX Spectrum in the early '90s, Horace was our "star".

Turbo button, ha-ha-ha! :D

I'm a programmer too, so I always enjoy episodes, updates like this. The career milestones soo true, I worked half year for free while I wrote my thesis, but I won't regret it, learned much and I'm working still there in full time.

turbo button: when you just have to take things more slowly :P.

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turbo button: when you just have to take things more slowly :P.

Those who had this might remember there was a display that showed the frequency (in Mhz, only 2 digits were required) and it changed when you pressed the turbo button.

I also remember the shock when I built a computer for the first time in a summer job and realized that these values can be set to whatever I'd like, regardless to the actual processor speed.

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turbo button: when you just have to take things more slowly :P.

Those who had this might remember there was a display that showed the frequency (in Mhz, only 2 digits were required) and it changed when you pressed the turbo button.

I also remember the shock when I built a computer for the first time in a summer job and realized that these values can be set to whatever I'd like, regardless to the actual processor speed.

i dont think that mine actually had such a display.

the reason for the turbo was that more than a couple of programs were using a mixture of clocks (crystals frequencies) as a timer. so when your machine became too fast, the program (game) became too fast to play as well. for a prime example see Space Quest IV http://www.spacequest.net/archives/misc/timerissues/ .

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turbo button: when you just have to take things more slowly :P.

Those who had this might remember there was a display that showed the frequency (in Mhz, only 2 digits were required) and it changed when you pressed the turbo button.

I also remember the shock when I built a computer for the first time in a summer job and realized that these values can be set to whatever I'd like, regardless to the actual processor speed.

i dont think that mine actually had such a display.

the reason for the turbo was that more than a couple of programs were using a mixture of clocks (crystals frequencies) as a timer. so when your machine became too fast, the program (game) became too fast to play as well. for a prime example see Space Quest IV http://www.spacequest.net/archives/misc/timerissues/ .

Yeah, I know, at some point turning off the turbo was the only way to play games like this.

5CdB8y3GHvs

The earlier machines didn't have the display, but I think that by the time I was old enough to take computer parts and put them together was around 486 or early Pentium, computers looked like this at the time:

486-2.jpg

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turbo button: when you just have to take things more slowly :P.

Those who had this might remember there was a display that showed the frequency (in Mhz, only 2 digits were required) and it changed when you pressed the turbo button.

I also remember the shock when I built a computer for the first time in a summer job and realized that these values can be set to whatever I'd like, regardless to the actual processor speed.

i dont think that mine actually had such a display.

the reason for the turbo was that more than a couple of programs were using a mixture of clocks (crystals frequencies) as a timer. so when your machine became too fast, the program (game) became too fast to play as well. for a prime example see Space Quest IV http://www.spacequest.net/archives/misc/timerissues/ .

Yeah, I know, at some point turning off the turbo was the only way to play games like this.

5CdB8y3GHvs

The earlier machines didn't have the display, but I think that by the time I was old enough to take computer parts and put them together was around 486 or early Pentium, computers looked like this at the time:

486-2.jpg

yep, i saw 486s at my friends and pascal programming course ive attended in my early teens. back then i didnt actually know about what it does all that much. i went like this: 286->386SX->133MHz (dads work laptop, yay, expensive as f*** if he was to buy it himself.... and starcraft had 166MHz minimum reqs...gah!) -> ....

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This was awesome!

I just loved how he talked for 20 minutes straight haha.

Its fantastic how you guys love what you do.

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@nodag: we live in a small world: I've worked for Oliver Deussen a few years ago as a student research assistant. Now I'm a teacher at a high school here in Konstanz and am prepairing my first course in game design and programming for students next year.

@DF Oliver: Another guy with a similar youth here :) Same game programming book, same urge to create a first person adventure (using Bryce 3D). However, until now I've only been able to release one small 3rd person adventure game. Anyway, very inspiring to listen to your story. It's great to see how happy you are with your job at DF.

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What an heart-warming story! Thanks for bringing it out :) excellent work.

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Wow, exciting story. The contrast between where he was born and where he is now is pretty much as strong as it could have been.

Also, he seems like the nicest guy ever.

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Must have missed this Side Quest when it came out all the way back in May!

Awesome story, Oliver! So happy Double Fine has so many talented and devoted individuals working for it!

I never heard of Lucidity before, but it looks so beautiful I just bought it off of Steam!

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