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Broken Age release plan

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The whole point of removing the publisher from the picture (at least in my opinion) was to give the team freedom and not force them to rush an unfinished, unpolished, game out the door to help fund it's sequel. You're bypassing the publisher but running into the same problems you'd have if you had one. I don't care how long the game takes to come out, the end result is what's important to me. Splitting the game in an episodic way cheapens it to me.

I wish Double Fine had more realistic cost expectations, especially considering how far ahead of your original kickstarter goal you guys finished from. I would much rather you sought outside investment, did a double fine car wash, anything than push your game out early to make a quick buck.

DF seems filled with incredibly talented, creative people, but I'm disappointed with the management of the company.

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The whole point of removing the publisher from the picture (at least in my opinion) was to give the team freedom and not force them to rush an unfinished, unpolished, game out the door to help fund it's sequel. You're bypassing the publisher but running into the same problems you'd have if you had one. I don't care how long the game takes to come out, the end result is what's important to me. Splitting the game in an episodic way cheapens it to me.

I wish Double Fine had more realistic cost expectations, especially considering how far ahead of your original kickstarter goal you guys finished from. I would much rather you sought outside investment, did a double fine car wash, anything than push your game out early to make a quick buck.

DF seems filled with incredibly talented, creative people, but I'm disappointed with the management of the company.

It's not episodic, part one is being released and then part 2 is being merged with that to form a complete product.

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It's not episodic, part one is being released and then part 2 is being merged with that to form a complete product.

That's just semantics and misses my point. A complete product divided into multiple parts is exactly what episodic content is.

My point is that they're rushing it out the door just like they would if they were forced to by a publisher. So what's the point of kickstarter again? The only difference seems to be that all the risk is pushed onto the consumer/backer rather than publisher.

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It's not episodic, part one is being released and then part 2 is being merged with that to form a complete product.

That's just semantics and misses my point. A complete product divided into multiple parts is exactly what episodic content is.

My point is that they're rushing it out the door just like they would if they were forced to by a publisher. So what's the point of kickstarter again? The only difference seems to be that all the risk is pushed onto the consumer/backer rather than publisher.

If you watch the new doc you can see that they had two choices: cut most of the game, or release it in two parts. It starts off as episodic and then becomes one game at the end. Obviously cutting the game is a bad idea so episodic is the way to go.

Besides, you can wait a few more months and play the game as a whole if you wish. :)

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If you watch the new doc you can see that they had two choices: cut most of the game, or release it in two parts. It starts off as episodic and then becomes one game at the end. Obviously cutting the game is a bad idea so episodic is the way to go.

Besides, you can wait a few more months and play the game as a whole if you wish. :)

I did watch the doc, and as a sidenote the documentary is great. I found myself siding with DF Greg. I think it cheapens the product. They only ended up in this situation in the first place because their ambition exceeded their resources. I'll ask again though since you seem to be missing the point, if crowdfunding was supposed to free developers from the pressures exerted on them by publishers, that doesn't seem to be happening. Maybe a hybrid is what is needed in the future, consider letting a publisher match donations dollar for dollar so that crowdfunding can move on from small indie projects to the larger more ambitious projects DF seems to want to produce.

As far as waiting for the complete product, you're right, I could do that. The smart thing would be to play all games on a 5 year lag when everything is cheaper. Unfortunately, I like discussing games with friends while they're still relevant and it would take a lot of self control to say no to a new adventure game from Schafer and co.

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Releasing the first Act in a polished state before the second one isn't quite what I think of when hearing the phrase "rushing a game out the door". The idea is that this will allow for a more polished and well-formed game, not for one less so. The release might not have quite the same impact as otherwise, but I think that's worth sacrificing.

It will hopefully be made abundantly clear that the first act on its own is a pre-release, not the actual release. But that should even go without saying considering the purpose of Steam Early Access. Prison Architect wasn't rushed out the door either just because you can already buy it. Quite to the contrary, it continues to be developed diligently, since money comes in through alpha funding. The idea is to avoid rush by alpha funding, instead of rushing without it.

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I'm not bothered that part 1 is released early, but I wont be playing until the whole game ships, and don't mind waiting any amount of time. I'm sure others will feel the same.

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then get ready to avoid any gaming sites, forums or, well.. ,the web at all, during the waiting time for act II ;) it will be discussed and spoiled to death...

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If you watch the new doc you can see that they had two choices: cut most of the game, or release it in two parts. It starts off as episodic and then becomes one game at the end. Obviously cutting the game is a bad idea so episodic is the way to go.

Besides, you can wait a few more months and play the game as a whole if you wish. :)

I did watch the doc, and as a sidenote the documentary is great. I found myself siding with DF Greg. I think it cheapens the product. They only ended up in this situation in the first place because their ambition exceeded their resources. I'll ask again though since you seem to be missing the point, if crowdfunding was supposed to free developers from the pressures exerted on them by publishers, that doesn't seem to be happening. Maybe a hybrid is what is needed in the future, consider letting a publisher match donations dollar for dollar so that crowdfunding can move on from small indie projects to the larger more ambitious projects DF seems to want to produce.

As far as waiting for the complete product, you're right, I could do that. The smart thing would be to play all games on a 5 year lag when everything is cheaper. Unfortunately, I like discussing games with friends while they're still relevant and it would take a lot of self control to say no to a new adventure game from Schafer and co.

Why doesn't it seem to be happening? They've been able to make a game that they want and change things on the fly to how they want. Would a publisher be happy with the decision they've just made? Most likely not, but they get to do it because they don't have the pressure from the publisher. They are in control of their own fortunes.

And contrary to what you stated - this is not "episodic". Once the full game is released, you will no longer be able to simply purchase "Parts 1 and 2". You will just be able to purchase the game.

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If you watch the new doc you can see that they had two choices: cut most of the game, or release it in two parts. It starts off as episodic and then becomes one game at the end. Obviously cutting the game is a bad idea so episodic is the way to go.

Besides, you can wait a few more months and play the game as a whole if you wish. :)

I'll ask again though since you seem to be missing the point, if crowdfunding was supposed to free developers from the pressures exerted on them by publishers, that doesn't seem to be happening. Maybe a hybrid is what is needed in the future, consider letting a publisher match donations dollar for dollar so that crowdfunding can move on from small indie projects to the larger more ambitious projects DF seems to want to produce.

One thing to note though, is that the money raised in the kickstarter was only from 90,000 people. And that's worldwide. people are still weary of kickstarter as it is a bet. it's not a complete product, it's a promice of your money being spent on a project to make a product, in a way WE are the publisher. the plus side is that we want the product the down side is that we care more when bad things happen to the project. DFA was the first thing i backed. i don't think i'm the only one.

Plus, If you ask the average man on the street if he's even heard of kickstarter i think you'll find most people don't. So i think the amounts people giving money should rise, right? And also, i don't think kickstarter should ever be used for anything other than indie projects. the idea of a games pulisher makeing money out of my 'donation' is not one i like.

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Why doesn't it seem to be happening?

Because the design choices are still being hampered by that little ole thing called money.

I'm not going to argue whether this is episodic anymore, it's pointless and has no bearing on the argument, call it whatever you want.

We can only speculate on the quality of what the first half of the game will be like, but is it improbable to think that during the development of the 2nd half refinements would be made? Refinements that would be relevant to earlier parts of the game had they not already shipped? Sure they could patch it in, but this isn't a rogue-like or a shooter where you'll have iterative updates to the game to keep it fresh. Adventure games are more movie like, once you've seen it, once you've solved it's puzzles there isn't that drive to play over and over again. You might come back to it later for the nostalgia but there's limited replayability because you'll already know all the puzzles.

I backed this with the perhaps naive idea that we would see DF really creating their dream game. When were back to discussions about scoping it feels like we're back in the land of publishers and money being the deciding factor of what makes it in the game and what doesn't, and I find that disappointing. I'd honestly rather they broke the rules and got outside funding, or started a second kickstarter just so that dream project could be a reality even if it was still 2-3 years from release.

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I don't post at all here, since i just drop by for the usual updates from DF and 2PP, but i feel the need to share and help spread the thought of one of the creators of The Banner Saga (apologies if this had already been posted, i didn't see it linked or quoted anywhere), who in the last update of the project wrote down his thought about the matter. I do realize that this is part of a backers-only update but there are no information at all about the project itself, so i think it's ok to share if for the greater good :)

Lots of stuff has been going on in the Kickstarter community lately. I'm sure many of you have noticed Double Fine's announcement about splitting up their game into two parts. They've gotten some serious heat for this. Backers of Shadowrun have heard similar things about the content in that game, with the DLC being released much later.

First of all, I want to be clear that we do not intend to do something like this for The Banner Saga. When it releases it will be a complete product. We don't have plans for DLC at this time, and we will continue to support the multiplayer component. We also intend to continue on the sequels (chapter 2 and 3) just as planned.

I would also like to talk about my personal opinion on this, and I'd love to be open and talk like a normal person instead of a PR person in damage control mode. Can we do this? Without freaking out? You can disagree with me of course, just be nice about it.

This is hard. Like, way WAY hard. When we pitched the game we were hoping for enough money to get extra animations, maybe increase the length of the game. We thought we'd get, like, 2000 backers, not 20,000. A fine problem to have, right? Haha! Except that it's actually a huge problem. The hardest problem I've ever dealt with in my life. Now I know.

We thought now we could do everything we ever wanted for the game, and got too ambitious. We thought we could make the game in six months, and I'm still not sure what we were thinking. That was stupid. I wish I could take that back, all we needed to do was put a different date there and nobody would be complaining. Whoops. We ARE still doing everything we want, and it's taking a long time. I don't feel bad about that. That was the POINT, right? To dream as big as we could?

It's interesting to think of it from someone else's point of view. For many people, letting a dev shoot for the moon is NOT the point. For a lot of people the point is I BOUGHT A GAME, WHERE IS IT? They want the biggest, best game ever made, on time, for their $10 contribution. I can see that, too. I don't really agree... but I suppose it's a matter of perspective.

If nothing else, I think the gaming community is finally getting a good picture about real game development. What would really shock people is that there is nothing unusual about any of this, except that you are finally seeing it. This is every game development story that has ever existed, except instead of the publisher dealing with it, YOU are.

Budgets of 1 to 4 million are small-to-medium sized. Our budget of $650k (in actual funding) is relatively small, half a year of production for a small team. Budgets of kickstarter projects asking for $20k... that's not enough to make a game, that's just some content. Surprise! Games you've come to expect as "standard" like Call of Duty: maybe 150 million to make, rough guess. You know how much Old Republic cost? I'm not legally allowed to tell you, actually. It's that much. Now you know.

Games take 1 year to make... if it's a casual iOS game, or an annual sequel. Medium sized games take 2-3 years. Large games take 4-5 years. Believe it or not, lots of games fall in a nebulous space between AAA and "indie", whatever that means. The Old Republic took over 6 years. Yeah, you started hearing about it 1 year before it released. It started production five years before that. For five years hundreds of people toiled on it 12 hours a day and you had no idea! Now you know! Isn't knowing about production right from the start wonderful? No, it's not. It's annoying. It takes FOREVER. That's why you usually don't hear anything until it's almost ready to ship.

Delays, content cuts, pushed back dates, plans to make revenue sooner- this is how games are developed. Bioshock Infinite, the biggest game of 2013, got delayed for half a year, AFTER pre-orders were sold. Journey took 3 years to make a 3 hour game and had to go back for more funding from Sony TWICE. That's how game development goes. They didn't know they'd need to do it. Humans are not good at estimating creative endeavors, no matter how "professional" they are.

We released a truly free demo hoping to make some extra cash for development, and got brutalized for it. But without that income and development time our single-player game wouldn't be as good. Some people will never understand this.

I've worked in games for about a decade. Some companies I worked for had their stuff together better than others. Some were a huge, hundred-million dollar, extremely delayed nightmares. Every company had delays and went over-budget. You know what a release date is? A guess. We're just guessing.

Essentially, I hope people don't freak out too much about what's happening with Kickstarter right now. It's not deceitful or underhanded. It's not a conspiracy. It's normal stuff, whether you like it or not. If Broken Age wasn't a Kickstarter game the first time you would have heard about it would be a couple months from ship, and that it was a two-part adventure game. And you would have been fine with that.

Our game is coming along better than I could have imagined, even if delayed. BECAUSE it's delayed. I'm super happy with it. Other companies have way bigger problems, but that's game development. NOW YOU KNOW. I sincerely hope everything works out the best for them, and you should too. At the end of the day, they're nice guys trying to make good entertainment for you. I, personally, will cut them all the slack in the world.

So there you have it. The games industry! The aristocrats! Maybe it'll get better someday? For now, let's enjoy our time together! (I love you).

-Alex

I couldn't agree more, to be honest

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Unless I've got my information wrong, Grim Fandangos budget was 3 million, which really surprises me considering they can't manage to finish a game like this on the budget they have.

With my lack of game making knowledge and ignorance I almost expect both acts to be on a scale of Grim Fandango now with that 6 million budget they are aiming for, but what do I know. (Maybe Grims 3 Million budget was just for production excluding marketing)

I do think Tim AND the producer screwed up by not aiming for a more modest sized game so that they could finish it within the 3 million dollar budget they were fortunate to get.

Surely with their experience you would think they would have the words REALISTIC SCHEDULE WITH BUDGET stapled to their foreheads like most professional creatives do when in production on a project.

BUT the man (Tim) does have some awesome fuc#ing cred, he is an artist. I think we should all let him make his baby, I'm sure it will be amazing and I cant wait to play this thing, its going to be special! : D

And if its not, he will definitely get the next one right ; )

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Even if it is far from my ideal scenario, I am fine with the release plan considering the state the project is in. The game looks stunning and I have faith that the creative forces behind it will deliver on the story and puzzle side as well.

However, to be completely honest, the recent updates left me worried. It´s admirable that Double Fine is working hard to deliver an uncompromised vision of the game and seeking solutions to do that. But from my own experience working with commercialised artistic products this often leads to an unsustainable economic situation for the creators. Unfortunately, doing the best you can within time- and monetary constraints is the only realistic goal you can have as an creator (not citing this as some absolute truth, just my viewpoint). Given the history of previous Double Fine games development and that it is an established company with industry veterans I would have hoped a lesson had been learned regarding the balance of producing great games with the economic realities of a business. Sure, it is a common problem in game development but that doesn´t mean it needs to be accepted as a natural law of the process. I would really like to see Double Fine going from a struggling company that produces charming and original games to a sustainable one so we all can enjoy more cool games.

The last update left me with two distinct reactions. First, the delays and talks about delivering on all their ambitions raised my expectations tremendously. Maybe not a rational response but still my true gut reaction. Secondly, I will probably never kickstart or back any potential crowdsourcing project from Double Fine in the future. I would rather wait until a finished project a released publically and then assess if I find it interesting. From my personal perspective I prefer to not put down any money up front if no clear plan is present or if there is signs of failing to sticking to it.

I didn´t back Massive Chalice even if it seems to be right up my alley. I´m sad to say this is because I don´t trust Double Fine to deliver a product within the budget given and within a reasonable timeframe from my own subjective, totally arbitrary, wants. And even if it probably wasn´t the intention, waiting to reveal the full extent of the problems with Broken Age until Massive Chalice was funded came of as shady and dissapointing to me.

With the pessimism out of the way I still eagerly anticipate Broken Age and will continue to enjoy the excellent documentary.

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Unless I've got my information wrong, Grim Fandangos budget was 3 million, which really surprises me considering they can't manage to finish a game like this on the budget they have.

With my lack of game making knowledge and ignorance I almost expect both acts to be on a scale of Grim Fandango now with that 6 million budget they are aiming for, but what do I know. (Maybe Grims 3 Million budget was just for production excluding marketing)

I do think Tim AND the producer screwed up by not aiming for a more modest sized game so that they could finish it within the 3 million dollar budget they were fortunate to get.

Surely with their experience you would think they would have the words REALISTIC SCHEDULE WITH BUDGET stapled to their foreheads like most professional creatives do when in production on a project.

BUT the man (Tim) does have some awesome fuc#ing cred, he is an artist. I think we should all let him make his baby, I'm sure it will be amazing and I cant wait to play this thing, its going to be special! : D

And if its not, he will definitely get the next one right ; )

You are forgetting that grim fandango was more then 10 years ago. With the current inflation number would be more 4.5 to 5 mil about the same amount this game is probably going to cost.

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a) Just a small reply to some people - this isn't episodic gaming! Please take a look at The Walking Dead - the episodes form a coherent whole, of course, but each episode is separate when you play. One ends, the other begins, and they do so with outros and intros. I don't think DF wants to do the same with BA. I think it's more akin to rather literal "release the first half ending in a cut to black or something, then use the money to finish part two and then merge the whole thing into one product".

b) Given what glimpses of the game the latest episode of the documentary shows the game is shaping up to be amazing - and I think it's worth it to wait a bit longer.

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I've been on the "silent but appreciative" spectrum of DFA backers so far during the development; but after seeing all of the negativity being passed around the net, I wanted to be sure to chime in here and say that I fully support the decisions Double Fine has made so far in regards to additional funding. I'm all for delivering a more complete feeling game using additional funding in the way Double Fine has been going about it; self funding from in-house revenue sources.

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Unless I've got my information wrong, Grim Fandangos budget was 3 million, which really surprises me considering they can't manage to finish a game like this on the budget they have.

With my lack of game making knowledge and ignorance I almost expect both acts to be on a scale of Grim Fandango now with that 6 million budget they are aiming for, but what do I know. (Maybe Grims 3 Million budget was just for production excluding marketing)

I do think Tim AND the producer screwed up by not aiming for a more modest sized game so that they could finish it within the 3 million dollar budget they were fortunate to get.

Surely with their experience you would think they would have the words REALISTIC SCHEDULE WITH BUDGET stapled to their foreheads like most professional creatives do when in production on a project.

BUT the man (Tim) does have some awesome fuc#ing cred, he is an artist. I think we should all let him make his baby, I'm sure it will be amazing and I cant wait to play this thing, its going to be special! : D

And if its not, he will definitely get the next one right ; )

You are forgetting that grim fandango was more then 10 years ago. With the current inflation number would be more 4.5 to 5 mil about the same amount this game is probably going to cost.

1998's $3 milliion = $4194782.45 in 2012 using latest available annual CPI. (I look smart, there but I just used one of the many available Inflation Calculator websites :) ). But CPI is really just a general indicator and doesn't reflect all cost rises (such as salary jumps especially in certain "hot" fields, for example) and also that doesn't take into account the mitigating factor that GF was made by a large company with many existiing resources, human and otherwise.

I think DF encountered a problem for which there was no perfect solution. Creativity resists Taylorization and that's ultimately a good thing for all of us. We are not investors; this is much closer to the patronage relationships of old and there is no return on investment here except the joy of supporting a brilliant group of people as they collaborate and create something from nothing in front of our very eyes for our eventual gaming pleasure. Episodic content, or even things that arrive in two or three parts have been with us for a long time and aren't necessarily causally related to poor product. The Three Musketeers, Anna Karenina, and practically everything by Charles Dickens was serialized. What a slacker that Tolstoy was! ;) I think it was the only move they could make. I trust I will love the eventual game, because nothing I have seen so far tells me I won't, and this is all just the ride I bought my ticket for.

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I think it was the only move they could make. I trust I will love the eventual game, because nothing I have seen so far tells me I won't, and this is all just the ride I bought my ticket for.

I think they have lots of options available to them, especially if we're really only talking about January to May. Which I remain skeptical of.

Regardless of whether or not the backlash over this is justified (which it's probably not), it's utterly predictable, and it's a blow not just to Double Fine, but to Kickstarter as a whole. I feel like to put themselves out there to take such heat on a torch-bearing project like this is not a good decision.

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Reboot the art style with a dramatically simpler look?

This should have been done like 10 months ago. I think you could probably even preserve much of that style with less parallax layers and animated bits and whiz-bang rim-lighting stuff.

$4.5 million or whatever should be enough to produce anything Tim writes. They overshot on the art process, and then avoided every opportunity to correct course, despite realizing this relatively early on.

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Reboot the art style with a dramatically simpler look?

This should have been done like 10 months ago. I think you could probably even preserve much of that style with less parallax layers and animated bits and whiz-bang rim-lighting stuff.

$4.5 million or whatever should be enough to produce anything Tim writes. They overshot on the art process, and then avoided every opportunity to correct course, despite realizing this relatively early on.

And yet I'm still glad that they found ways to find more funds and keep development on track. This seems just like the latest one of those. Because I LOVE what they've done with the art, I don't think it's frivolous, I think it will substantially increase my enjoyment of the game. If they'd blown the budget and now the game can't come out because of the art, I'd see what you mean. But it is coming out, and without too many cuts. Whoop!

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Unless I've got my information wrong, Grim Fandangos budget was 3 million, which really surprises me considering they can't manage to finish a game like this on the budget they have.

With my lack of game making knowledge and ignorance I almost expect both acts to be on a scale of Grim Fandango now with that 6 million budget they are aiming for, but what do I know. (Maybe Grims 3 Million budget was just for production excluding marketing)

I do think Tim AND the producer screwed up by not aiming for a more modest sized game so that they could finish it within the 3 million dollar budget they were fortunate to get.

Surely with their experience you would think they would have the words REALISTIC SCHEDULE WITH BUDGET stapled to their foreheads like most professional creatives do when in production on a project.

BUT the man (Tim) does have some awesome fuc#ing cred, he is an artist. I think we should all let him make his baby, I'm sure it will be amazing and I cant wait to play this thing, its going to be special! : D

And if its not, he will definitely get the next one right ; )

You are forgetting that grim fandango was more then 10 years ago. With the current inflation number would be more 4.5 to 5 mil about the same amount this game is probably going to cost.

1998's $3 milliion = $4194782.45 in 2012 using latest available annual CPI. (I look smart, there but I just used one of the many available Inflation Calculator websites :) ). But CPI is really just a general indicator and doesn't reflect all cost rises (such as salary jumps especially in certain "hot" fields, for example) and also that doesn't take into account the mitigating factor that GF was made by a large company with many existiing resources, human and otherwise.

I think DF encountered a problem for which there was no perfect solution. Creativity resists Taylorization and that's ultimately a good thing for all of us. We are not investors; this is much closer to the patronage relationships of old and there is no return on investment here except the joy of supporting a brilliant group of people as they collaborate and create something from nothing in front of our very eyes for our eventual gaming pleasure. Episodic content, or even things that arrive in two or three parts have been with us for a long time and aren't necessarily causally related to poor product. The Three Musketeers, Anna Karenina, and practically everything by Charles Dickens was serialized. What a slacker that Tolstoy was! ;) I think it was the only move they could make. I trust I will love the eventual game, because nothing I have seen so far tells me I won't, and this is all just the ride I bought my ticket for.

Don't forget that Broken Age's budget is actually about 2.2 million from KS, not 3.5 (which includes documentary, fees and rewards) So Grim Fandango had at least twice the budget in terms of money-worth (although development in general was very different in 1997 so it's not really a good point to point comparison in any case -DF are developing much higher res assets for more than one platform, as one example)

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I think it was the only move they could make. I trust I will love the eventual game, because nothing I have seen so far tells me I won't, and this is all just the ride I bought my ticket for.

I think they have lots of options available to them, especially if we're really only talking about January to May. Which I remain skeptical of.

Regardless of whether or not the backlash over this is justified (which it's probably not), it's utterly predictable, and it's a blow not just to Double Fine, but to Kickstarter as a whole. I feel like to put themselves out there to take such heat on a torch-bearing project like this is not a good decision.

Nope, not LOTS of options. 2. 1) Scale back radically, or 2) Complete and ship in 2 shards so backers, even dedicated ones, don't get tetchy over lack of active gamecuddle.

C'mon, let's not kid around. We WANT the BIG game, we want that big game in the TS head, don't we? I know I do. And I know I am going to get it. I have no doubt that I am going to get it. I didn't expect it. I signed on at about 3500 backers and was content with a flash game, but I would honestly prefer the one I see coming together from Tim.

And ultimately the entire endeavor was and is about giving creativity sway and scope without publisher constraints. As I said, the only option available (I will add, in these particular circumstances) was to ship in pieces. I personally would rather see a later, finished game, but this team is intelligent and careful and so sparked I think they will actaully find ways to take advantage of the episodic form. I trust them. I trust them because nothing they have done is nonsensical, or weasily, or off the rails in terms of the orignal aim of going to Kickstarter in the first place. And, again, this is exactly the ride I wanted. The backlash seems to be coming mostly from nonbackers who have no stake, but do have some sort of dullish axe that demands negative attention in order to stay sharpened, which I would call a Janus axe, as I recall only an outpouring of "AWESOME" when things were going very well over here - hey, maybe that cheap old fairweather Janus Axe could be one of the special relics in Massive Chalice, who know? :)

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And yet I'm still glad that they found ways to find more funds and keep development on track. This seems just like the latest one of those. Because I LOVE what they've done with the art, I don't think it's frivolous, I think it will substantially increase my enjoyment of the game. If they'd blown the budget and now the game can't come out because of the art, I'd see what you mean. But it is coming out, and without too many cuts. Whoop!

Yeah, as long as that remains true. But the situation makes me a little anxious. There's a lot of bad vibes now, and they've been open that they don't have funding secured to develop the second half. What if that hurts sales of the early access release? What if the second half also runs long and they exhaust their funds?

It's an unnecessarily risky move. If it all pans out, I'll be happy and satisfied, but I would be more comfortable if they worked with what they had to begin with.

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Don't forget that Broken Age's budget is actually about 2.2 million from KS

Don't forget that Broken Age's budget has grown by $2+ million after the KS, too.

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This post by Daedalic founder Carsten Fichtelmann somewhat puts things in perspective:

I unfortunately have to admit that the combined budget of Edna's Breakout, Harvey's New Eyes, 1.5 Knights, Deponia, Chaos on Deponia, Goodbye Deponia, A New Beginning, The Whispered World, Satinav's Chains, Memoria, 1954: Alcatraz and The Night of the Rabbit was less than 3M Euro. These are 11 adventure games with a mean length of usually 10 hours. None of these titles is just average! I have no idea what we'd do with 3M. A Heavy Rain, maybe. Should I be depressed? I just think it's alarming that TS wanted to have 0.3M $ and now 3M are not enough. By the way, Deponia 1-3 is more than 40 HOURS long (!) and competes internationally, everywhere.

Now I AM kinda worried and suprised concerning the current situation...

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