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Episode 10: Part One of Something Great

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Hmm, what about the idea of some sponsorship/advertisment in the game

That can maybe raise a bit money.

Product placement is more and more common in movies and i see no reason why it cant be used in games as well.

Lets say the boy can use nike shoes and the girl prada or something.

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Hmm, what about the idea of some sponsorship/advertisment in the game

That can maybe raise a bit money.

Product placement is more and more common in movies and i see no reason why it cant be used in games as well.

Lets say the boy can use nike shoes and the girl prada or something.

EVIL!!!

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(first post, quick intro - hi everyone, I'm french, so don't mind my angliche)

I'm very disappointed by this video - in particular by the lack of extreme metal content.

When Celtic Frost is the only blackish metal band in your directory of metal bands, this means you're doing something wrong: can we have more blood and gore in the next video? (please?)

Also I didn't get why you decided not to go with the telltale model (5 episodes per season).

Non-backers would have had to pay as soon as the first episode was available (Q1 2014?), and you would have had until the end of the year (Q4 2014?) to deliver the final episode.

When I understood the actual plan (took a little while), I have to say I was a bit puzzled / pissed of.

I almost said to myself: "Sacrebleu! Je suis floué! Fieffés coquins, rendez moi mon or!"

But then I realized this is not the 19th century anymore, and decided to revert back to my regular french cursing (can we curse in french in this forum?)

This is also when I realized (<- did I mention I was a bit slow) that my reaction - that this video, this forum, this very stupid post...well that's actually what I paid for.

I paid to backup a team of people I believed in and to see how gross the kitchen could get before I finally had the chance to put my dirty hands on that delicious meal.

I am not so disappointed, after all :)

(one last note: to the people that are feeling they're being somehow ripped off - remember that feeling when you buy your 200th steam game on the next summer sale! Also remember to have a look at the handful of those games that you actually played and enjoyed. I'm sure BA will one day be one of them :) )

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(first post, quick intro - hi everyone, I'm french, so don't mind my angliche)

I'm very disappointed by this video - in particular by the lack of extreme metal content.

When Celtic Frost is the only blackish metal band in your directory of metal bands, this means you're doing something wrong: can we have more blood and gore in the next video? (please?)

Also I didn't get why you decided not to go with the telltale model (5 episodes per season).

Non-backers would have had to pay as soon as the first episode was available (Q1 2014?), and you would have had until the end of the year (Q4 2014?) to deliver the final episode.

When I understood the actual plan (took a little while), I have to say I was a bit puzzled / pissed of.

I almost said to myself: "Sacrebleu! Je suis floué! Fieffés coquins, rendez moi mon or!"

But then I realized this is not the 19th century anymore, and decided to revert back to my regular french cursing (can we curse in french in this forum?)

This is also when I realized (<- did I mention I was a bit slow) that my reaction - that this video, this forum, this very stupid post...well that's actually what I paid for.

I paid to backup a team of people I believed in and to see how gross the kitchen could get before I finally had the chance to put my dirty hands on that delicious meal.

I am not so disappointed, after all :)

(one last note: to the people that are feeling they're being somehow ripped off - remember that feeling when you buy your 200th steam game on the next summer sale! Also remember to have a look at the handful of those games that you actually played and enjoyed. I'm sure BA will one day be one of them :) )

5 episodes per season can only be done if you plan ahead doing that. They probably build the game with Act 1 and Act 2 already so splitting it there would be easy. Second act could be where boy and girl have met and they have an adventure together or something.

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Hmm, what about the idea of some sponsorship/advertisment in the game

That can maybe raise a bit money.

Product placement is more and more common in movies and i see no reason why it cant be used in games as well.

Lets say the boy can use nike shoes and the girl prada or something.

EVIL!!!

Why?

Whats the argument?

Im pretty sure you can implement something like that withouth breaking the immersion of the game and the same time DF will still have full creative control.

Of course it depends on the product.

Some game examples :

Interactive content such as games can be combined with advertisement in the form of product placement. Virtual characters can use sponsored objects and move in commercially themed environments. Further, quests and missions can contain brand messages. Those placements are most often sold by the video game owner to paying brands and agencies.

However, sometimes the economics are reversed and video-game makers pay for the rights to use real sports teams and players. Today, product placement in online video is also becoming common.

Online agencies are specializing in connecting online video producers, which are usually individuals, with brands and advertisers.

The following lists some examples from three decades of product placement in video games:

Pole Position (1982)

An early example of product placement in a video game is in 1982's Pole Position which has billboards along the track for other Atari Games.

Pole Position II

In Pole Position II the in-game billboards were paid adverts for Dentyne gum, 7-Eleven convenience stores and Tang orange drink mix.

Action Biker

A later example occurs in Action Biker (1984) for Skips crisps, a product by KP Snacks.

Crazy Taxi (1999)

More recently, Crazy Taxi (1999), featured real retail stores as game destinations.

Alan Wake

In Alan Wake the Energizer brand features prominently in the form of batteries and flashlights. Verizon also features in the game in the form of in-game billboards and cellphones, including Verizon's "Can you hear me now?" campaign.

There are of course Movie examples as well

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Hmm, what about the idea of some sponsorship/advertisment in the game

That can maybe raise a bit money.

Product placement is more and more common in movies and i see no reason why it cant be used in games as well.

Lets say the boy can use nike shoes and the girl prada or something.

EVIL!!!

Why?

Whats the argument?

Im pretty sure you can implement something like that withouth breaking the immersion of the game and the same time DF will still have full creative control.

Of course it depends on the product.

Some game examples :

Interactive content such as games can be combined with advertisement in the form of product placement. Virtual characters can use sponsored objects and move in commercially themed environments. Further, quests and missions can contain brand messages. Those placements are most often sold by the video game owner to paying brands and agencies.

However, sometimes the economics are reversed and video-game makers pay for the rights to use real sports teams and players. Today, product placement in online video is also becoming common.

Online agencies are specializing in connecting online video producers, which are usually individuals, with brands and advertisers.

The following lists some examples from three decades of product placement in video games:

Pole Position (1982)

An early example of product placement in a video game is in 1982's Pole Position which has billboards along the track for other Atari Games.

Pole Position II

In Pole Position II the in-game billboards were paid adverts for Dentyne gum, 7-Eleven convenience stores and Tang orange drink mix.

Action Biker

A later example occurs in Action Biker (1984) for Skips crisps, a product by KP Snacks.

Crazy Taxi (1999)

More recently, Crazy Taxi (1999), featured real retail stores as game destinations.

Alan Wake

In Alan Wake the Energizer brand features prominently in the form of batteries and flashlights. Verizon also features in the game in the form of in-game billboards and cellphones, including Verizon's "Can you hear me now?" campaign.

There are of course Mopvie examples as well

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=raLd8t04UYs

You can seriously tell me that doesn't break immersion?

In-game ads are never implemented well, and they can't be super-subtle or else the advertiser has no reason to put the ad in the game, if no-one's going to see it on account of subtlety.

Besides, Broken age takes place in another world.

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I'm kind of torn, too... On the one hand, I want the best game possible and as close to Tim's vision as it can be, regardless of how long it takes and where you get the additional money from.

On the other hand, I fear this split release will hurt the game and most of all the reputation of Double Fine. The general reaction to the announcement seems bad enough as it is, at least outside of this forum.

Yeah, it's a difficult decision, but in the end I would lean torwards the "split", since that means we will eventually get the "full" game.

So keep up the good work, I really like what I've seen from the game so far! And I'm absolutely enjoying the documentary, even the tough parts. Great job, 2PP!

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Just poppin' in to send continued support to Doublefine. I just want you guys to know how much I look forward to the updates and I enjoy every new bit of comedy/game art. You have taken us on an amazing journey and I can't wait to see where we end up. Keep it up Doublefine!

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I posted it already as a comment on Kickstarter. I am most afraid of having an unfinished game next year. Yes, I felt is was strange when Tim spoke about too little money in one of the past videos. Now with the message that even more money is needed, and that the development is that far behind, it feels even 'stranger'. Something is fishy here... its looks like really, really bad project management. Even though I think that something like this should not happen to 'video game vetarans' with a ton of experience, I can accept the mis-management and the delay.

What I cannot accept though, is to end up with an unfinished game. Lets say we get a decent part one in January, but folks on Steam are not that interested in the game and do not enough money gets in through the Steam Sale. What then? Do we get a crippled part two? Maybe we dont get a part two at all? I think that needs a lot more clarification from Tim and the team. My trust in this project and the team has decreased a lot, because I think that this huge delay, and this gap in financing, should really not happen with this very experienced crew!

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Hmm, what about the idea of some sponsorship/advertisment in the game

That can maybe raise a bit money.

Product placement is more and more common in movies and i see no reason why it cant be used in games as well.

Lets say the boy can use nike shoes and the girl prada or something.

EVIL!!!

Why?

Whats the argument?

Im pretty sure you can implement something like that withouth breaking the immersion of the game and the same time DF will still have full creative control.

Of course it depends on the product.

Some game examples :

Interactive content such as games can be combined with advertisement in the form of product placement. Virtual characters can use sponsored objects and move in commercially themed environments. Further, quests and missions can contain brand messages. Those placements are most often sold by the video game owner to paying brands and agencies.

However, sometimes the economics are reversed and video-game makers pay for the rights to use real sports teams and players. Today, product placement in online video is also becoming common.

Online agencies are specializing in connecting online video producers, which are usually individuals, with brands and advertisers.

The following lists some examples from three decades of product placement in video games:

Pole Position (1982)

An early example of product placement in a video game is in 1982's Pole Position which has billboards along the track for other Atari Games.

Pole Position II

In Pole Position II the in-game billboards were paid adverts for Dentyne gum, 7-Eleven convenience stores and Tang orange drink mix.

Action Biker

A later example occurs in Action Biker (1984) for Skips crisps, a product by KP Snacks.

Crazy Taxi (1999)

More recently, Crazy Taxi (1999), featured real retail stores as game destinations.

Alan Wake

In Alan Wake the Energizer brand features prominently in the form of batteries and flashlights. Verizon also features in the game in the form of in-game billboards and cellphones, including Verizon's "Can you hear me now?" campaign.

There are of course Mopvie examples as well

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=raLd8t04UYs

You can seriously tell me that doesn't break immersion?

In-game ads are never implemented well, and they can't be super-subtle or else the advertiser has no reason to put the ad in the game, if no-one's going to see it on account of subtlety.

Besides, Broken age takes place in another world.

Most games and movies do take place in another world, but that doesn't hinder product placement still.

I'm however totally agreeing with you that that YouTube clip was an example on how not to do it.

The other argument that its never implemented well i feel this is more a matter of personal taste and opinion.

The last argument about Super-subtle i think is also a matter of personal opinion and taste

What feels subtle for one person doesnt need to feel that way for another.

Some prefer apples and some oranges and some other people again prefer pears.

Don't take my post the wrong way though, it was only a suggestion.

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(first post, quick intro - hi everyone, I'm french, so don't mind my angliche)

I'm very disappointed by this video - in particular by the lack of extreme metal content.

When Celtic Frost is the only blackish metal band in your directory of metal bands, this means you're doing something wrong: can we have more blood and gore in the next video? (please?)

Also I didn't get why you decided not to go with the telltale model (5 episodes per season).

Non-backers would have had to pay as soon as the first episode was available (Q1 2014?), and you would have had until the end of the year (Q4 2014?) to deliver the final episode.

When I understood the actual plan (took a little while), I have to say I was a bit puzzled / pissed of.

I almost said to myself: "Sacrebleu! Je suis floué! Fieffés coquins, rendez moi mon or!"

But then I realized this is not the 19th century anymore, and decided to revert back to my regular french cursing (can we curse in french in this forum?)

This is also when I realized (<- did I mention I was a bit slow) that my reaction - that this video, this forum, this very stupid post...well that's actually what I paid for.

I paid to backup a team of people I believed in and to see how gross the kitchen could get before I finally had the chance to put my dirty hands on that delicious meal.

I am not so disappointed, after all :)

(one last note: to the people that are feeling they're being somehow ripped off - remember that feeling when you buy your 200th steam game on the next summer sale! Also remember to have a look at the handful of those games that you actually played and enjoyed. I'm sure BA will one day be one of them :) )

Amen! Very well met Greumbeul! You say what I feel (and in French no less)!

Seth B

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Tim Schafer is throwing a small party. He asks some folks to chip in for beer.

87,142 people chip in $3,336,371 for beer.

"Oh shit," thinks Tim. "I can't throw a tiny little party and just pocket the rest of the cash. I need to make this an amazing party."

Tim plans out an amazing party. It has been a long, long time since there's been a party this amazing. Everyone wants a party like this. But in order to get really nice drinks and music and whatnot, it turns out it's going to cost even more than what's been chipped in.

"Fuck it," Tim says. This party is already going to be crazy, why not go the extra mile? Tim decides to make it a full weekend. Everyone who's already on the guest list is welcome to attend. The party will be so rad that people who aren't on the guest list will want to show up. They're welcome too-- but they have to throw in some cash, just like everyone else. That extra cash will pay for the tigers and fire-breathers.

Everyone is happy.

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Tim Schafer is throwing a small party. He asks some folks to chip in for beer.

87,142 people chip in $3,336,371 for beer.

"Oh shit," thinks Tim. "I can't throw a tiny little party and just pocket the rest of the cash. I need to make this an amazing party."

Tim plans out an amazing party. It has been a long, long time since there's been a party this amazing. Everyone wants a party like this. But in order to get really nice drinks and music and whatnot, it turns out it's going to cost even more than what's been chipped in.

"Fuck it," Tim says. This party is already going to be crazy, why not go the extra mile? Tim decides to make it a full weekend. Everyone who's already on the guest list is welcome to attend. The party will be so rad that people who aren't on the guest list will want to show up. They're welcome too-- but they have to throw in some cash, just like everyone else. That extra cash will pay for the tigers and fire-breathers.

Everyone is happy.

Ha ha ha

Funny

I have a feeling i will have one hell of a hangover when the party is over

but even so who in their right mind would want to miss out.

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Why not sell the dev tools to other developers?

If they are anything like a modern version of SCUMM I'd buy them in a heartbeat...

On the other hand, seeing Tim's cryptic construction of dialogues in Google Docs doesn't look very promising...

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Wow, a great episode - though, Bagel was right. There seem to be a lot of people that are (at least a little bit) pissed off.

I feel for you guys, being another one of the backers that works in game development (I am currently employed a a generalist artist). In fact, one of the biggest draws for me was the art and the amount of painstaking work that the team has put into making it look utterly amazing. It was great to see the "current" state of the game in this episode!

Best of luck in the coming sprint(s) to everyone! Keep up the inspiring and wonderful work!

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The biggest "problem" I see with splitting the game into two (or more) parts is that it might end up just like Dreamfall: The Longest Journey. It was a great adventure (at least in my cloudy memories) that unfortunately ended up ending with a cliff hanger and no story resolution.
Anachronox is another good example.

SiN Episodes is probably not a good example.

Heck, even Psychonauts was left with an obvious sequel hook.

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As usual, this was a wonderful installment. My wife and I look forward to these updates as much as any TV show. The fine folks at DF are just so creative, so lovely, so...invested...in these worlds that they are putting so much effort into. I know, intellectually, that there are many intelligent and wonderful designers, artists, producers, directors, etc. in the industry. But there's something about this group of people that seems different, somehow. And I would pay a whole lot more than I already have for the chance to spend a little more time in their world (even a half hour of it per month).

As far as the "splitting the game" decision goes, it should be obvious to anyone who watched this video that nobody is playing fast and loose with the money, the fans, or the game. These choices are agonizing, for them as much as for us (and more, obviously) and it's more than insulting to insinuate that the problem lies with flippancy or mismanagement on their part. I'm all for any design decisions that lead to the biggest, most well-crafted game possible.

DF, don't worry about the bitter few--I would bet that more of us agree with your decision than don't.

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DF, don't worry about the bitter few--I would bet that more of us agree with your decision than don't.
Thanks Tim and DF team. You're doing a great job AGAINST ALL ODDS!

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All the hate will stop once the games ships, then it's miller time. Till then, sadly, Tim and the Reds crew will just have to weather the storm. I'll support any Tim Schafer game period, lord knows how many times i've repurchased Psychnaughts lol

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i'm not mad or negative, i want the best game. Whatever way! BUT... this looks bad for them, hopefully it doesn't last once the game ships.

It's weird, you'd think they could have come up with 3 months of new funding (Jan through April) to avoid this whole press/appearance issue. 3 months is a lot less than the original gap of needing another year.

Which makes me skeptical if it will really only be 3 more months. I'm not worried about the time frame so much, but it seems something may not be right with that...

And transparency is good, but if they felt they HAD to go this route they should have phrased it as "the full game will be release in May 2014, with Steam Early Access of the entire finished, first half available in January. Whatever funds we raise from the first half will go into making the second half longer and fuller." - which would be 100% true, because I assume even if they don't get a single sale that they will release something for the second half... right?

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"Gamers" as a collective have a worse attention span than a six year old on an epic sugar buzz. Assuming nothing happens to keep "the story" alive it'll be forgotten about this time next week.

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"Gamers" as a collective have a worse attention span than a six year old on an epic sugar buzz. Assuming nothing happens to keep "the story" alive it'll be forgotten about this time next week.

Luckily most adventure gamers are different and generally have a longer attention span than the average player of shooters. ;)

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We were warned that we'd get to see how the sausage gets made, warts and all. ;)

Seriously though, looking at the game in this episode... I imagined it'd be good, but seeing it all together is impressive. You can tell a lot of care and love has gone into it.

Also, 2PlayerProductions: you guys did an awesome job with the intro for the documentaries (i.e. the 2HB poster being photographed). Terrance Lee, too. Every time I watch the intro I'm reminded of of the meaning behind the project. It's great.

Make sure both you and Double Fine are looking after yourselves in the coming months. :)

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I've read through a lot of comments regarding this issue, and most in this thread.

This is one hell of an exercise in communication.

There are people working from the premise that Broken Age has anything to do with DFA/the original Kickstarter proposal. The original budget for Broken Age was $2,232,465, that for the Kickstarter proposal something south of $300,000. So those arguing that you have almost nine times the budget originally hoped for are misinformed at their own fault, or deliberately shutting out information to be up in arms about something.

However, working off the $2,232,465 budget, we are entering the realm of objective wrong-doing. According to episode 10, Brutal Legend has made a bit more than $900,000, and the Humble Bundle is said to raked in a similar amount, both of which, allegedly, I'm missing a source though that doesn't mean it isn't out there, have been infused into Broken Age. If that's true, that would basically add up to at least 150%-200% of the original budget (depending on the exact numbers and whether all of that went into BA). Not knowing game development, I don't know if that is cause for concern. Intuitively, I'd say yes, although I wouldn't worry too much at that point.

However, with this increased budget, we're looking at a game that has a projected release of 2015 and a plan that had 75% too much content.

And this is where tolerance finds its limit.

First of all, these numbers were not released by the time the Massive Chalice Kickstarter went up, although they must have been known internally (simply by virtue of the edited, finished episode being up a week later, and the writing on the wall being visible much sooner). The company has most likely omitted this information. Double Fine has multiple development teams. However, it is manipulation by omission. Comments all over the place have proven that some people would not have backed Massive Chalice, had they known the extent of the(!) troubles another project under the same company has. It is anyone's individual call how to judge this behaviour, but to me, it's being rather selectively "clear" with information, I think that has to be acknowledged at least.

And I don't think people who backed smaller amounts are necessarily affected here. I have gotten incredible value for what I paid, virtue of the documentary alone (2 Player Productions are truly talented). I think what's happened has already affected the spirit of Kickstarter. This isn't a game made by backer money, this is a game made by backer money, additional purchases, Brutal Legend, Humble Bundle, and now Steam Early Access and whatever else I forgot. The large pool of backers extends a certain amount of trust to the developer to develop a title for the amount pledged - at least that's my perception. I was expecting to kickstart a part of Double Fine. For the company to put out a title that proved that it can be done without publishers. We won't know that know with Broken Age, because we'll never know if a smaller game would've been successful, because Tim Schafer decided to make a bigger game. And the bad thing isn't the bigger game, but the bigger risk. It seems as though Double Fine, by the time Broken Age gets released, has almost sacrificed all rewards anyway, making it more and more unlikely that Broken Age will become the game that makes the company truly independent.

Seeing the footage of the game, it's likely they are working on something rather special. But I see another dark side of game development here. Tim is putting increasing pressure and risk on the entire company to get the game he wanted made, instead of the game he could have made. Someone said something along the lines of using the budget they got, not the budget they wanted, and that seemed about right. I understand Greg's disappointment. The game was given different parameters than what they've worked with, and now they are forced to consistently adjust to the degree that it's painful.

It's a philosophical issue of sorts. If Broken Age turns out to be a great game, a lot will be forgotten. If Broken Age turns out to be profitable, that'll be even more significant. But right now, damage has been done. Journalists are running (inappropriately) rampant with an uncontrolled message, people are disappointed for all sorts of reasons. It's an incredibly tough situation to be in, and puts the make or break nature of this project for Double Fine front and center.

EDIT: Because this post is negative, I feel obligated to say that, regardless, I do wish Double Fine luck and that they make it.

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Where has it been stated that DF is in trouble? They have chosen to double the game scope and found a way to fund it. I still refuse to see this as a failure, but as a incredible success story.

I wish the news headlines would have been:

Double fine manages to double it's KS success: twice the game for the same amount of money!

Broken age is officially DOUBLE fine!

Double fine two times more succesfull!

Double fines glass not half full or half empty, but completely full!

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I've read through a lot of comments regarding this issue, and most in this thread.

This is one hell of an exercise in communication.

There are people working from the premise that Broken Age has anything to do with DFA/the original Kickstarter proposal. The original budget for Broken Age was $2,232,465, that for the Kickstarter proposal something south of $300,000. So those arguing that you have almost nine times the budget originally hoped for are misinformed at their own fault, or deliberately shutting out information to be up in arms about something.

However, working off the $2,232,465 budget, we are entering the realm of objective wrong-doing. According to episode 10, Brutal Legend has made a bit more than $900,000, and the Humble Bundle is said to raked in a similar amount, both of which, allegedly, I'm missing a source though that doesn't mean it isn't out there, have been infused into Broken Age. If that's true, that would basically add up to at least 150%-200% of the original budget (depending on the exact numbers and whether all of that went into BA). Not knowing game development, I don't know if that is cause for concern. Intuitively, I'd say yes, although I wouldn't worry too much at that point.

However, with this increased budget, we're looking at a game that has a projected release of 2015 and a plan that had 75% too much content.

And this is where tolerance finds its limit.

First of all, these numbers were not released by the time the Massive Chalice Kickstarter went up, although they must have been known internally (simply by virtue of the edited, finished episode being up a week later, and the writing on the wall being visible much sooner). The company has most likely omitted this information. Double Fine has multiple development teams. However, it is manipulation by omission. Comments all over the place have proven that some people would not have backed Massive Chalice, had they known the extent of the(!) troubles another project under the same company has. It is anyone's individual call how to judge this behaviour, but to me, it's being rather selectively "clear" with information, I think that has to be acknowledged at least.

And I don't think people who backed smaller amounts are necessarily affected here. I have gotten incredible value for what I paid, virtue of the documentary alone (2 Player Productions are truly talented). I think what's happened has already affected the spirit of Kickstarter. This isn't a game made by backer money, this is a game made by backer money, additional purchases, Brutal Legend, Humble Bundle, and now Steam Early Access and whatever else I forgot. The large pool of backers extends a certain amount of trust to the developer to develop a title for the amount pledged - at least that's my perception. I was expecting to kickstart a part of Double Fine. For the company to put out a title that proved that it can be done without publishers. We won't know that know with Broken Age, because we'll never know if a smaller game would've been successful, because Tim Schafer decided to make a bigger game. And the bad thing isn't the bigger game, but the bigger risk. It seems as though Double Fine, by the time Broken Age gets released, has almost sacrificed all rewards anyway, making it more and more unlikely that Broken Age will become the game that makes the company truly independent.

Seeing the footage of the game, it's likely they are working on something rather special. But I see another dark side of game development here. Tim is putting increasing pressure and risk on the entire company to get the game he wanted made, instead of the game he could have made. Someone said something along the lines of using the budget they got, not the budget they wanted, and that seemed about right. I understand Greg's disappointment. The game was given different parameters than what they've worked with, and now they are forced to consistently adjust to the degree that it's painful.

It's a philosophical issue of sorts. If Broken Age turns out to be a great game, a lot will be forgotten. If Broken Age turns out to be profitable, that'll be even more significant. But right now, damage has been done. Journalists are running (inappropriately) rampant with an uncontrolled message, people are disappointed for all sorts of reasons. It's an incredibly tough situation to be in, and puts the make or break nature of this project for Double Fine front and center.

EDIT: Because this post is negative, I feel obligated to say that, regardless, I do wish Double Fine luck and that they make it.

Why does the game has to be made within the kickstarter money that is the biggest thing here. Allot of projects I see on kickstarter put their own money behind it to increase the scope to something they want to produce. Especially because this game is so important for double fine. It needs to be the size and quality they are happy with. And they didn't find the scope they could do for the kickstarter money big enough for the game they wanted to create. And that is the most important thing to remember if this game has to be the future for double fine it needs to show what they can do with an adventure game.

And first game in a certain type always takes more work to make then new parts after it they had to create the engine and editing tools. And allot more from the beginning while future games could probably be made for around the money kickstarter gave so they need allot less budget for those games. Which they probably get from the sales from this part.

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I can watch the first part of this over and over again just to see the gameplay segments again and again. The game looks so incredible.

*Great personanlized art.

*A modern look

*With the feel of a classic point&click; adventure.

To the whole team: Awesome work.

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Splitting the game into two Acts is not all that bad. It gives you a break from all that adventuring. I'd rather have the game split into two than for all of that great storytelling reduced into compressed little package (less game, essentially). This ain't the Need For Speed.

I feel like there is enough hype at the moment for people to respond to Act I on Steam Early Access. It is still a gamble but I think it's worth jumping on. I am very eager to play the game as it stands. I'm sure there are plenty of non-backers who have been looking forward to this game since Grim Fandango.

Like any creative project, this game has grown to an unpredictable state from the initial idea. Now, it's a mammoth of ideas. It could've been a simple flash game but they are raising their own bar. I've got no problem with them needing more money if it means that they'll be able to create something which may end up becoming a ClassicAdventureGame™. The team can't make a game on empty stomachs.

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Great, if difficult, decision to take. I've played to many games that start out brilliantly and then have a rushed ending (dark souls for example) because the money was running out. Really looking forward to January, plus if its as difficult as some old adventure games it might be time for part two when I'm finished it anyhow.

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