Darth Marsden

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Why should Purcell make the same mistake twice (unless it was/is profitable)?

I would be happy about a new Sam & Max but it don't need it from TTG. What i really enjoyed in their games was slapping Max but when it comes to the adventure and the sauciness, Hit the Road is so much better. TTG's implementations often were boring, had dull or annoying characters and i really don't want to step into the office again and again and do things three times again and again and ... nope, really not.

A rude intelligent humorous sexist road movie like non episodic case, that's where Sam & Max belongs to.

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I don't know. I have Hit the Road but despite being a big Sam & Max fan, I can really only bring myself to get up to the puzzles in the funfair and that's more or less it before I get bored. It's nothing to do with it being a old school Lucasarts game or anything because I went through Monkey Island 1, 2 and Curse of Monkey Island back in 2011 when I first jumped into Monkey Island.

It's just for me, Sam & Max Season 3 was the first intro to Adventure Games I had. Unless you count the very old Spongebob adventure games based on the movie and stuff from back in 2004, one based on Lights Camera Action in 2005, and another one which I can't remember so I guess Season 3 was my intro to real hard as hell Adventure Games.

It's kind of ironic to think about now. That it was was TTG's last great Adventure Game that had lead me to playing the other ones. Definitely happy about that because it did lead me to some of my favourite comedy games now with stuff like Tales of Monkey Island, Strong Bad, and Sam & Max Season 2 springing to mind

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Hit the Road is witty, it has dialogues and situations which can make you burst out laughing (the talkie version). It also has a few annoying aspects but it's not boring. It is an adventure which is fun and worth being played, and that's quite rare.

TTG's best moments were Bone 2, Puzzle Agent 1 and The Trial and Execution of Guybrush Threepwood (and gfx related Faith).

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It's kind of ironic to think about now. That it was was TTG's last great Adventure Game that had lead me to playing the other ones. Definitely happy about that because it did lead me to some of my favourite comedy games now with stuff like Tales of Monkey Island, Strong Bad, and Sam & Max Season 2 springing to mind

The same thing has happened with users on the Telltale forums from the Walking Dead crowd who you would least suspect of being interested in cartoony/comedy games like such. I've recommended Tales of Monkey Island and Sam and Max: The Devil's Playhouse to several people, and even got one "dudebro"-ish user to talk about how he liked the game through PMs with me on behalf of my recommendation.

Sure, the abstract puzzles in LucasArts style games may intimidate some casual players, but instead of tuning the gameplay to fit the franchise, (up until the choice games) all Telltale did was use extremely simply LucasArts style puzzles that alienated both old and new fans.

Instead of tuning their gameplay formula to remove the potentially intimidating abstract elements of the puzzles while still having gameplay, they just removed everything instead of finding a sensible and smart compromise by modifying the gameplay to where it could coexist with the story.

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Oh, I know that some TWD fans have grown interested in older games, Hell If I remember right, I think I might have recommended a few myself in a forum post although I can remember if I did or not.

Whatever the case, when it came to me. The writing and wit of Hit the Road wasn't as good as TTG's S&M games. It could be because I didn't get that far in before I started getting bored and annoyed with the puzzles of Hit the Road but I though TTG had some of the better puzzles.

I mean for example, say what you want but in a game like Monkey Island 2 where you have to use a monkey to close up a waterfall, that is really out there as weird and something you would likely just stumble on if you didn't search up a walkthrough.

In TTG, the puzzles at least are a little more based in reality. For example, convincing Flint Paper to wear a hardhat to avoid being shot in the head or having Max drink Holy Water so Jurgen, a vampire couldn't attempt to drain his blood etc.

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So, Steam is running a sale on The Walking Dead Season 1 and 2 and I decided to pick up Season 2 and see how it is so wish me luck.

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Oh I mean no Simpsons whatsoever. No Classic episodes. No nothing. Either that or you can have a big marathon watching all the latest episodes. Including Lisa goes Gaga

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Instead of tuning their gameplay formula to remove the potentially intimidating abstract elements of the puzzles while still having gameplay, they just removed everything instead of finding a sensible and smart compromise by modifying the gameplay to where it could coexist with the story.

I don't know why they didn't just do a "normal mode" and "hard mode" like Monkey Island 2 and 3 did. One mode could have very few puzzles and only easy ones, and the other could have a lot of satisfying and challenging puzzles. Everyone wins.

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Speaking of Monkey Island, Escape sucked some serious arse.

Why do I imagine you as this guy right now

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Instead of tuning their gameplay formula to remove the potentially intimidating abstract elements of the puzzles while still having gameplay, they just removed everything instead of finding a sensible and smart compromise by modifying the gameplay to where it could coexist with the story.

I don't know why they didn't just do a "normal mode" and "hard mode" like Monkey Island 2 and 3 did. One mode could have very few puzzles and only easy ones, and the other could have a lot of satisfying and challenging puzzles. Everyone wins.

Yeah, I've mentioned that idea before too. A "story" mode with 90 minute dialogue selecting episodes and an "adventure" mode with gameplay designed to fit the franchise - be it puzzles or otherwise - would be a great idea. They could just start with the gameplay first and trim it down to story only for "story" mode instead of working upwards and adding on content. It's not like they don't have experience making longer episodes with more gameplay on a much quicker, truly monthly schedule.

However, Telltale would probably just worry about anything potentially alienating their hyper-specific casual niche - multiple gameplay styles be damned. :/

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Gotta say, I've been enjoying TWD Season 2 so far. Not sure if it's as good as Season 1 but the story at least has me invested. I've currently finished Episode 2 and I can say I was easily pissed off at

Carver and that girl who basically backstabbed everyone

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If Season 2 somehow wins a billion GOTY awards, I don't know what I'll do. It will probably involve circling the world by expelling a constant stream of rancid diarrhea as my primary form of propulsion, though.

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Speaking of Monkey Island, Escape sucked some serious arse.
I liked it. I liked the plot, a primary villain other than LeChuck was a nice change, and I thought some of the puzzles were quite clever. I didn't even mind Herman's retcon, as this is a series with voodoo and trickery, so it doesn't necessarily have to be true (and would make for a great potential sequel if it wasn't). I also really liked the Disneyland Connection, expanding on the connections from previous games. Monkey Kombat was tedious and unnecessary though, and their 3D graphics engine at the time (GrimE) just wasn't suitable for human characters. Those two detractions don't make it worthy of all the hate it gets though, in my opinion.

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Ironically (considering the direction Telltale's gone), Escape would work far better with a controller.

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I like them all but Escape (and Grim Fandango) would be so much better if the engine wasn't so shitty.
Have you tried Grim Mouse? Hopefully he'll do something similar for Escape from Monkey Island now that it is completable in ResidualVM, because it's like a dream to play Grim Fandango with a mouse as a true point and click adventure.

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It would work if you wouldn't turn 180° if you hit a corner. And if you wouldn't have to run through slim areas in time based puzzles. Ruining another attempt by suddenly turning around for no reason.

Well, don't hit corners then!

Personally, I never had a problem with the control options for Escape or Grim Fandango. Granted, I completely restructured the controls to suit my preferences, so that probably has something to do with it.

For Escape, changing the movement keys from arrow to WASD and using the arrow keys to cycle through the available action options made the timed puzzles a breeze. Like, seriously, got them all first try, no sweat. I'd recommend it to anyone who was relatively okay with the WASD/click movement controls in Tales because it's basically the same experience, but with scrolling.

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Hmm, i wonder how large the percentage of gamers is that actually enjoyed the controls in Grim Fandango (any stats about this?). Personally i don't know a single person who enjoyed them. The controls in Psychonauts weren't the best as well, dunno, controls are evergreens like 3D or camera behaviors.

XY years after Pong and you still can be thankful if devs spent some resources on a) that they work at all and b) also feel good. As for 3D, this once was a novelty on the Arcades, on the C64, on the Amiga, on ... i suspect you'll be able to sell articles which (try to) wow their readership with how to make a game, even, in 3D for many years to come.

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You do now.

I found them incredibly easy to adjust to. I'm actually quite a fan of games that don't use a mouse because they're easier to play on a laptop.

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Well, at least you also reconfigured the controls.

As for the notebook, connect a mouse and move it over your leg (or the back of the sex slave kneeing in front of yours, i don't know what kind of life you're living).

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My problem with the timed puzzles was always less about the controls and more that I had used the Quick and Easy installer for Escape and was using it to run the game in a window. Took me forever to figure out that the timing on the boulder puzzle actually worked properly if I switched to full screen. I thought the timing just didn't work properly on my computer.

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