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Alcoremortis

The Spectacular Marvel Super-Thread

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I think that if the Rhino had Peter's body, he'd probably get it mashed to bits in the first day.

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I was briefly into Spider-Man toward the end of J. Michael Straczynski's run on the comic. I was really enjoying it, got some really cool stories out of that, Civil War happened and that was interesting because of how it affected Peter. Then it lead into One More Day and I rage quit.

My new obsession is the new Captain Marvel book. So freaking good. The writing, the art. I love that Carol Danvers has been a consistently likable person and an actual hero. I feel like too many comics these days have kind of made a mockery of the word.

Like I've also been reading the new Guardians of the Galaxy book and I really like it. But I also notice that it is pretty casual about it's heroes killing. Which makes sense considering their various histories. Plus it's basically Marvel's version of Star Wars (lol, that's a funny concept these days) so it's really a style thing.

Going from it to Captain Marvel marks a stark difference in how the heroes of both books handle combat though. And I think there's something admirable and pure to the concept of heroism in the restraint shown by Captain Marvel. Which is a big reason why I'm obsessed with it.

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I was briefly into Spider-Man toward the end of J. Michael Straczynski's run on the comic. I was really enjoying it, got some really cool stories out of that, Civil War happened and that was interesting because of how it affected Peter. Then it lead into One More Day and I rage quit.

I'd suggest trying out Big Time if you can, it was the Spidey redemption arc for me post One More Day.

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I'll look into it. I'm still a pretty big fan of Spider-Man so any excuse to get back into him.

But for now more Captain Marvel praise. Because I just read this page in issue 9:

F47eatn.jpg

And instantly thought of this:

tumblr_m31zzcrLTK1qd8t4mo1_500.gif

Congratulations Comic you have balanced the mundane with the fantastic and I now love you for the foreseeable eternity.

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There's a number of things that made me love Hulk comics. Most of them in Peter David's run.

But this one really stood out to me when I read it:

QyvWMqh.png

EDIT: Also, this one. It happens right after Tony Stark starts moping to Banner about not being able to walk.

nItWJPn.png

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BTW Alcoremortis. What's your take on Banner's various portrayals in film so far?
Yeah, Alco. Answer the question!

(That's my way of saying I'd like to know as well)

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I loved the Avengers version. Ruffalo basically seemed to channel the Banner from the Peter David books (and Peter David thought so as well, so that should validate this opinion) where Banner is still kinda tip-toeing, but ultimately more comfortable with himself. The Peter David Banner was someone who was so used to keeping himself under control that he was more or less unflappable. Someone could pull a gun on him and he'd just stare down the barrel and be all "O rly?" because by that point he just had nerves of steel. And that makes sense to me and also increases the drama/tension/whatever whenever someone actually manages to provoke him.

In addition, the humor that they added to his character for the movie was fantastic. Because in the comics, Banner is kinda a hilarious guy. Along with the unflappable-ness, he's totally all about self-deprecating humor, and making obscure references to things that nobody's heard of and often responding to tense situations with really inappropriate jokes or facetious comments. In the comic universe, he's basically what Tony Stark is in the movie universe and Tony Stark is the mopey one. I mean, at one point, he and Tony Stark are working together on some project, Stark asks him if he has any questions and Banner asks him what the capital of Paraguay is. There is less conversation after that point. (Also, there was this fantastic cut scene from Avengers where, after Black Widow tells Banner that they have all the toys, he asks her if they have a Nintendo 64, to which she has no answer because she has no idea what it is. I was so sad that they left it out of the final version).

The Norton Banner was okay and but he definitely got shafted in the writing. Apparently, Edward Norton wrote some amazing little character conversations for the script and every single one of them got cut. Peter David stuck them in the novelization of the movie, though, so they're available for the readings. There was a little humor, but on the whole he was taking things much too seriously. However, I think the main problem with his movie was the plot. You can't have a hero's quest plot where the hero is doomed to fail. That can be the aspect of a larger plot, but it shouldn't be the main focus of the film. Especially when in the comics, Banner generally keeps an eye out for a cure, but isn't actively searching one out, being far too preoccupied with simply surviving. If anyone wanted to do a "cure" film, it should be the psychological cure, which a) actually works and b) ends up with the Merged Hulk, one of the most hilarious Hulks there is. I think I posted a picture of him earlier in the thread. He's the one wearing size 20 pink bunny slippers.

The Bana Banner (trying saying that ten times fast) was, I feel the weakest of the three. The movie had potential, but it failed in the painfully slow and boring beginning and the confusing ending. The middle had some great scenes, and I see what Ang Lee was trying to do, but it just didn't work. Part of this was due to the fact that Bana completely misinterpreted Banner, I think. He kinda took "emotionally repressed" as not having emotions, whereas for Banner, "emotionally repressed" means that he tends to squash down those emotions that he sees as "harmful" such as anger, hatred, passion and tries to maintain a relatively light-hearted demeanor. Bana's acting just came out as flat. Maybe it was because they seemed to be going for the early source material where nobody in the comics had much of a personality, but if so, that was a matter of choosing the wrong source material to get a character idea from.

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Cool! I haven't read any Hulk comics so I'm not an expert on the character. But I felt Ruffalo's portrayal (and of course Joss Whedon's writing) of the character was probably the most fun and interesting. Good to know that he went over well with fans (and writers) of the comics too.

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Yeah, Peter David said that he fell in love with the portrayal right at the beginning when Banner yells at Black Widow ("Stop lying to me!") and then totally just doesn't react when she pulls a gun on him. Or, doesn't react in any way a normal person would react. He said that that was something his Banner would have done in a similar circumstance.

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Cool! I haven't read any Hulk comics so I'm not an expert on the character. But I felt Ruffalo's portrayal (and of course Joss Whedon's writing) of the character was probably the most fun and interesting. Good to know that he went over well with fans (and writers) of the comics too.

When talking about universally acclaimed Hulk runs, Peter David's is the way to go. Peter David actually had never written a comic before Hulk, had some other position within Marvel at the time, but at the time Hulk was a title that was doing horribly and only getting published due to decade's old cultural clout from the TV series. Because nobody at Marvel saw Hulk as a big seller, Peter David was given carte blanche and used the opportunity to tell really engaging, intelligent, psychological stories.

These proved to be surprisingly popular, at which point Peter David was kicked because now Hulk was a big seller and therefore valuable, and of course that means reducing the character back to what he was BEFORE the Peter David run would increase his appeal to a wider audience.

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Cool! I haven't read any Hulk comics so I'm not an expert on the character. But I felt Ruffalo's portrayal (and of course Joss Whedon's writing) of the character was probably the most fun and interesting. Good to know that he went over well with fans (and writers) of the comics too.

When talking about universally acclaimed Hulk runs, Peter David's is the way to go. Peter David actually had never written a comic before Hulk, had some other position within Marvel at the time, but at the time Hulk was a title that was doing horribly and only getting published due to decade's old cultural clout from the TV series. Because nobody at Marvel saw Hulk as a big seller, Peter David was given carte blanche and used the opportunity to tell really engaging, intelligent, psychological stories.

These proved to be surprisingly popular, at which point Peter David was kicked because now Hulk was a big seller and therefore valuable, and of course that means reducing the character back to what he was BEFORE the Peter David run would increase his appeal to a wider audience.

Oh comics industry, why are you so terrible to your talent?

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I found it pretty extensive. As far as comic series goes, they've got at least something of everything and if you're looking for a more major character, they've got a lot (like the big superheroes, they've got about a thousand comics a piece on the site). As far as individual runs go, there's some gaps, of course, which can be a bit annoying, but since they add more comics to it every week, those gaps are getting filled pretty quickly. The real value, as far as I'm concerned, is that you can basically sample any comic run you're interested in and see if that's something you'd like to follow. And most comics runs have at least a few comics from more or less every author in the run, so you can go through and see what you like and what you don't like for a relatively low cost.

The unfortunate thing is that there's no way of just reading through, say, every appearance of a certain character chronologically using just the Marvel Unlimited site. To a new comics person such as myself, it made it a bit difficult for me to figure out where to start and how to proceed. I imagine I'm probably one of the few people to have this sort of problem because I'm the sort of reader that wants to start at the very beginning and then proceed methodically to the end with everything in sequence. As far as Hulk goes, I've read every appearance of Hulk through the mid nineties and am still going. Not something I would have been able to do using only Marvel Unlimited, but Marvel Unlimited gave me the framework and the desire to do so.

So basically, I think it's a great resource and it's super easy to make it worth it. I think I've read a few thousand dollars worth of comics on that $60 a year subscription.

EDIT: Yeah, they were kinda terrible to Peter David, especially after what he did with the series. Luckily one of his successors, Paul Jenkins, was able to salvage the wreck they made after Peter David left and preserve his legacy.

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So basically, I think it's a great resource and it's super easy to make it worth it. I think I've read a few thousand dollars worth of comics on that $60 a year subscription.

It's $70 now. Also it's stupid and dumb because it doesn't work on my tablet.

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I guess they realized how much money they were losing on me. Had to make it up somehow, I guess.

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I think I'll give it a try. I want to get into comics a bit more deeply now that I have a regular income to sustain the hobby and $70 a year isn't bad considering all you get with it.

Are you planning on using it with a computer or a tablet? Are you thinking about buying comics digitally or is digital mostly for the "rental" model in your mind?

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A conversion!

Yeah, I know the feeling. I only started reading comics once I was out of college, though this was mainly because I didn't think the characters were interesting until I saw the Nolan Batman movies (the first two), which I thought were great so I went and watched Iron Man because that was a logical progression to my "I have no idea what comic book characters exist in what universes" mind. And then when everyone was saying how great Avengers was (and that it was written by Joss Whedon) I had to watch all the other Marvel movies.

And then I loved Ruffalo's Hulk, so I had to read all the Hulk comics. And then I read Peter David's Hulk, and the rest, as they say, is history.

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I think I'll give it a try. I want to get into comics a bit more deeply now that I have a regular income to sustain the hobby and $70 a year isn't bad considering all you get with it.

Are you planning on using it with a computer or a tablet? Are you thinking about buying comics digitally or is digital mostly for the "rental" model in your mind?

Um... I'm thinking of going digital for all new releases and doing most of my reading via Tablet. Unlimited is to round things out and give me a way to catch up with a lot of comic history and I'll probably fill in any gaps I can with issues found at Comic Book stores.

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Comixology is the leading store for the majority of major publishers. DRM'd comic files that can't be read outside of the app, but otherwise a great option. Frequent 99 cent issue sales, with a Marvel one every Monday.

The Marvel app and the Comixology app can link accounts so purchases from the Marvel site and app can appear in the more general Comixology store.

Image comics are now selling their digital comics DRM-free, so I'd personally suggest buying direct from Image and not through Comixology if you're buying an Image series. If you're NOT buying an Image series, you really should, Image's output the past few years has been phenomenal.

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A conversion!

Yeah, I know the feeling. I only started reading comics once I was out of college, though this was mainly because I didn't think the characters were interesting until I saw the Nolan Batman movies (the first two), which I thought were great so I went and watched Iron Man because that was a logical progression to my "I have no idea what comic book characters exist in what universes" mind. And then when everyone was saying how great Avengers was (and that it was written by Joss Whedon) I had to watch all the other Marvel movies.

And then I loved Ruffalo's Hulk, so I had to read all the Hulk comics. And then I read Peter David's Hulk, and the rest, as they say, is history.

I was semi-converted with Raimi's Spider-Man films. But sadly One More Day stamped that out. The MCU has really sparked my interest again though and I'm slowly feeling about at what's happening in comics right now. Captain Marvel is probably the book that has convinced me to dive in. I remember after seeing Avengers how everyone started talking about the character's relaunch and how cool it would be if she appeared in an Avengers movie later on (rumors which persist, fingers crossed there's something to them) and I was intrigued and decided to check out a couple of issues, and now I'm hooked.

Also Lewis "Linkara" Luvhoug's Atop The 4th Wall, while a comedy program criticising bad comics, has really gotten me back into the medium. Nothing like a teacher who is passionate about their craft to inspire passion in their students.

EDIT: Yeah I was probably going to use Comixology in some way as a digital distributor. Thanks for the details : ) Also what do you recommend from Image. Not sure I'm interested in The Walking Dead (over zombies and than some) but there's a lot of other stuff out there and I'm lost xD

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In the interest of keeping up a positive demeanor I'm NOT going to talk about my opinions of the Raimi films.

Especially the bridge scene.

Or my thoughts on Linkara

Because

we

are

all

veRY

happy

tOdaY

vTpgR4I.gif

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Just don't read the Ultimate Universe. Personally, I find it hilarious, but I know several people who rage at the mere mention of its existence.

Orson Scott Card wrote the beginning of the Ultimate Iron Man. He made Tony Stark into a mutant where his nervous system was all brain. His skin was brain.

He was Brain Man.

I couldn't stop laughing through the entire first issue.

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In the interest of keeping up a positive demeanor I'm NOT going to talk about my opinions of the Raimi films.

Especially the bridge scene.

Or my thoughts on Linkara

Because

we

are

all

veRY

happy

tOdaY

vTpgR4I.gif

I'm not a fan of the Raimi films anymore. I was never a fan of 3. And I can totally see why the Bridge scene would piss you off. But at the time they were the best comic book adaptations being made and they got me into Spider-Man in a big way.

Can't say I get why you'd dislike Linkara though, but maybe it's best not to talk about it.

EDIT: Also great HIMYM gif

But let's not talk about HIMYM either because I am having a pleasant day too.

svr1z.gif

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Just don't read the Ultimate Universe. Personally, I find it hilarious, but I know several people who rage at the mere mention of its existence.

Orson Scott Card wrote the beginning of the Ultimate Iron Man. He made Tony Stark into a mutant where his nervous system was all brain. His skin was brain.

He was Brain Man.

I couldn't stop laughing through the entire first issue.

Oh I may have to read that just so I can marvel (badish!) at the stupidity.

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While I agree with what he says, Linkara tends to yell a lot, and his videos are steeped in his own convoluted continuity which is not particularly interesting and very much hinders the casual viewer who just wants to watch the odd episode here and there.

But like you say, we're not talking about that, so never mind me!

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I think Linkara is okay as long as you stick with watching the bits of his show regarding the universally reviled comics (like One More Day, or that event in the Ultimate Universe where somehow reversing the magnetic poles of the Earth does more than change everyone's compasses).

But he does completely straight reviews for comics that are essentially PSA's. Like one where Spider-Man says "thank you" to the Teachers of the World. Sure, it's a dumb comic, but it's not like it was intended to be particularly engaging. Just a shout-out to all the teachers out there. But he reviews it totally straight with no acknowledgement of this fact. That and the side story stuff takes a huge chunk out of the actual reviewing portion of the show, which can get rather annoying if you're not a regular viewer and just want to see what he thought of one comic.

EDIT: Ultimate Marvel does have one shining moment of glory. At some point, Tony Stark (who is even more of an alcoholic in the Ultimate Universe than in the regular universe) makes the statement: "I wonder how practical it would be to take a bath in a martini."

It was glorious.

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I actually totally get those complaints and I agree. His comedy act could use some refinement. And the in show continuity, while fun, can get a bit long in the tooth. I watch him in small doses. I might also need to consider reading his blog as he won't be shouting every line there either.

I definitely agree with the bit about perspective as to the intent of the comics he's reviewing. I think that's what makes Doug Walker as the Nostalgia Critic so successful (especially in the last couple of years) as a comedy critic, because he'll have his big angry spiels at the dumb stuff but in the end if he'll step back and try to appreciate (if possible) what the movie was trying to do, and how it succeeded. I honestly think that more critics in that vein could stand to learn that trick.

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