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I'm still looking forward to trying Farcry 3. I heard nothing but poo poo about Farcry 2, but after a rough start to things I ended up really liking that game.

Deux Ex: Human Revolution - The Missing Link was great stuff. That whole game was good fun to me.

I had never heard of Critter Chronicles before. I just checked out one of the videos they had on the Steam page. That seems like the kind of humor that's right up my alley in what I saw.

I've still never played an Assasin's Creed game. For whatever reason that whole series never appealed to me. Not sure why.

I'm working on Dead Space 3 right now. It's really good! It certainly is not trying to re-create the tense atmosphere of the first, but you know what I'm OK with them going in a more action/adventure route with things. Dead Space 1 is a classic to me, I doubt they would be able to reach that level of awesomeness again. Going in a bit of a different direction with things while still retaining good gameplay and storyline is fine with me. Bonus - the voice acting is great and the facial features of the people you interact with are well done. I am so glad they decided to give the main character a voice of his own and not just keep him a silent protagonist. I think this is a prime example of giving a character a voice does not create a disconnect between a player and character, but only makes the character a more believable and likeable to play as. At least to me it has.

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Ok, so I played the xbox demo for Rayman Legends and I can say that I enjoy it way more than the WiiU version. In the game there is this little green guy that floats around and you interact with enemies and environment objects. In the xbox version he will auto target onto things that can be interacted with and you hit B to make him do things. In the WiiU version you have to constantly, and I do mean constantly look down at the gamepad screen and tap the environment object or enemy. This was one of my biggest fears about the WiiU before the system came out was the constant head moving like I was going to a fucking concert or something. Why does the WiiU need to bug me with constant distraction from the game I am trying to play? The DS and 3DS work because there is no big movement required to look at the second screen, it is literally centimeters away and you can quickly shift you eyes to get a look and look back. This doesn't translate well to big jerky movements with your neck. It also didn't help that I played the WiiU version at a demo kiosk were the screen is above your head and the gamepad is at about stomach height. The music level worked a lot better in WiiU version though, because you could just tap the screen in the right places to have the characters auto move for you, your attention is focused on the touch pad.

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Currently playing Skyrim.

What a fun game. I think I'm having as much fun finding and adding mods to it as I am at playing it.

At the moment, I have about 30 mods installed. Including Enhanced Mighty Dragons, Ultimate Follower Overhaul, Falskaar, Climates of Tamriel, UNP bodies (SFW version), All In One faces, Transparent Glass Armor, Nightingale Prime HD, Convenient Horses, Better Nights, Dragonbone Weapons (and Armor retexture), More Craftables, A Quality Map with Roads, House map markers, Colored Map Markers, SkyUI... and others.

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Alpha Prime.

It's one of those woefully-generic-made-in-some-random-country-you've-never-heard-of First Person Shooters. Not terrible, but not exactly amazing either.

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Tried to play Monaco a bit more, but I gotta say that I'm not having fun with it. Bought a 4-pack of it during the Steam sale, since it seemed like a nice coop game, and the premise for the game is really interesting. And I love the art style. But every mission so far seems like it just about getting to the top floor of the building, pick up some stuff, and get out. With pretty annoying gameplay.

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I've just finished "Justice for All" and I'm about to start "Trials and Tribulations". That last case was horrid in the way it played with my heartstrings. I had to choose between condemming an innocent woman to death or saving my kidnapped companion. Urgh!

I get really sad when I start a new Phoenix wright game. It takes me four cases to get to love the music ad then boom, they replace my favourite track with another one, which takes a bit of getting used to. I mean they're all awesome in their own right, but you start off hating them because of how awesome the previous games OST was. My favourite is the Cornered theme from the fourth game.

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Game Dev Tycoon

I am enjoying it but it might just be fun to make games with funny names and put them all on the Gameboy...

Everyone loves my Wallace and Gromit themed virtual pet games...

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This week (month and year) I've been mostly Football Manager 2013.

Actually it's quite scary how many hours I've put into the Football Manager series, specifically since 2010. My only real excuse is that I've also not worked since leaving university in 2010 and so have had a lot of spare time (too much spare time).

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Played some Borderlands 2 again. I still love it. The game combines three things from three different gaming genres that I really love:

a) Platformers: Exploring hidden areas

b) RPG's: Leveling up various stats, going on sidequests, developing a personality for the land and its characters

c) FPS'es: Co-op, ALL THE GUNS, setting things on fire, explosions

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Back to playing Fallout: New Vegas again. And despite the rough edges it has, I still love it.

Yes, the starting areas are bland.

Yes, the engine they use does make the game suffer a bit when it comes to building an immersive gameworld, since some areas aren't as big or well populated as they should be.

And yes, it feels odd that the population has managed to clean the houses and areas more than this after all those years.

But even despite that, the game is so brilliant. Every area has a story to tell, so many of them has so immersive quests, and the game feels so grown up. I've tried so many fantasy roleplaying games that are just a bunch of tropes strung together, that makes it hard to care. The satire of our community is just so fascinating. The legion maybe be over the top bad guys, but otherwise there are more grey areas then black or white in this. And I haven't even reached the DLQ quests, which are the main reasons for me to pick it up again.

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I think I'm pretty close to the end of Critter Chronicles. I mentioned this on IRC yesterday, but I encountered a really annoying bug in the Linux version. There's this painting mini-game where you're supposed to color a sketch with paint strokes using the cursor. It sounds simple enough but I ended up using about 30 tries and still couldn't complete that damn thing. Yesterday I installed and played the Windows version, and don't you fucking know it: first try, BAM! SUCCESS! That was fucking annoying. Especially so since there was a bug in a mini-game in the first game too. How about testing those mini-games a little better? The rest of the games are pretty good, so it's a shame that my overall impression of the game is less positive because of stuff like that.

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Back to playing Fallout: New Vegas again. And despite the rough edges it has, I still love it.

Yes, the starting areas are bland.

Yes, the engine they use does make the game suffer a bit when it comes to building an immersive gameworld, since some areas aren't as big or well populated as they should be.

And yes, it feels odd that the population has managed to clean the houses and areas more than this after all those years.

But even despite that, the game is so brilliant. Every area has a story to tell, so many of them has so immersive quests, and the game feels so grown up. I've tried so many fantasy roleplaying games that are just a bunch of tropes strung together, that makes it hard to care. The satire of our community is just so fascinating. The legion maybe be over the top bad guys, but otherwise there are more grey areas then black or white in this. And I haven't even reached the DLQ quests, which are the main reasons for me to pick it up again.

Amen. The writing in New Vegas was top notch. The world has this living, breathing, interconnected feeling that I haven't seen in any other game thus far. All of the factions have nuanced attributes and complex relationships with one another. The Legion, despite a smidge of cartoony badguyishness, have very believable motivations. It's also one of the few games that I've seen handle religion (Honest Hearts - Joshua Graham) in a mature, intelligent way. This is due, in my opinion, to the involvement of Josh Sawyer and a few of the writers under him.

I like the setpieces in F3 more, but its story and writing are largely forgettable. Same problem with Skyrim, honestly. You have tons of interesting areas to explore, but they aren't much more than window dressing. The Brotherhood were the good guys, the Enclave were the bad guys, and neither really had any depth to them.

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I like the setpieces in F3 more, but its story and writing are largely forgettable. Same problem with Skyrim, honestly. You have tons of interesting areas to explore, but they aren't much more than window dressing. The Brotherhood were the good guys, the Enclave were the bad guys, and neither really had any depth to them.

Skyrim is like the biggest waste ever in terms of open world RPG.

It's such a great experience to just wander the region, see the differences between the areas and just explore. But;

#1 - The writing is so bad in so many places.

#2 - The whole civil war thing is just wasted. It's not convincing done at all, and the characters who were setup for something good just wasn't used.

#3 - And ffs Bethesda. Stop utilizing this thing where I can walk up to any leader of any faction any time and here them spill their master plans openly, without even taking notice of the complete strange in the same f*cking room.

#4 - And realize that people liked the quests in New Vegas then in Fallout 3 more for a reason, and take some notice of what Obsidian does better then you.

#5 - And if your engine and gameplay mechanics has limitations take notice of it. Don't put me in these battles against tons of enemies when the game can't handle it.

There are loads of great stuff in Skyrim also, some really really good stuff. But all the misses puts it down to 3/5 because they kill the immersion over and over again.

rant>

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The world has this living, breathing, interconnected feeling that I haven't seen in any other game thus far.

It's something I love in game worlds, and I personally also see a similar quality in the original 2 Fallouts, Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind, Ultima VII, Arcanum, The Last Express, and in some respects KOTOR II.

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Tekken Tag Tournament 2.

I have to say that Tekken Tag Tournament used to be my favourite Tekken game of all time.

And now its the sequel. :D

Seriously good fun learning the characters and getting my ass handed to me online and by the AI even on normal! xD

My favourite character is Forest Law. And the team I'm main-ing at the moment is Paul Pheonix and Forest Law.

Speed and Powah! Though I'm still getting my ass kicked by basically everybody on there.

(I'm not terribly experienced at Tekken I will admit! XP)

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The world has this living, breathing, interconnected feeling that I haven't seen in any other game thus far.

It's something I love in game worlds, and I personally also see a similar quality in the original 2 Fallouts, Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind, Ultima VII, Arcanum, The Last Express, and in some respects KOTOR II.

I stand corrected. Perhaps 'many other games' would've been more accurate. :)

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The world has this living, breathing, interconnected feeling that I haven't seen in any other game thus far.

It's something I love in game worlds, and I personally also see a similar quality in the original 2 Fallouts, Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind, Ultima VII, Arcanum, The Last Express, and in some respects KOTOR II.

I gotta say, Fallout 2 especially just felt like a complete world. And the brutality of how you started off really helped with the immersion. I mean, how many games start you off with the net worth of a spear and a pair of pants getting your ass kicked by ants and then expect you to take on some of the most powerful forces on the planet?

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9s3P2fu.jpg

The puzzles are absolutely devious; there isn't even a hint of handholding; it has zero sympathy for anyone that doesn't take notes, read the manual, or watch the beginner's guide video; and you're almost never told where to go next.

And I wouldn't have it any other way.

I seem to get a lot of enjoyment out of very difficult (but fair) games. Solving a complicated multi-stage puzzle in La-Mulana using only my collection of notes and my own wits is something I find incredibly satisfying.

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9s3P2fu.jpg

The puzzles are absolutely devious; there isn't even a hint of handholding; it has zero sympathy for anyone that doesn't take notes, read the manual, or watch the beginner's guide video; and you're almost never told where to go next.

And I wouldn't have it any other way.

I seem to get a lot of enjoyment out of very difficult (but fair) games. Solving a complicated multi-stage puzzle in La-Mulana using only my collection of notes and my own wits is something I find incredibly satisfying.

that sounds like hell to me :smirk:

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that sounds like hell to me :smirk:

It's definitely not a game that will appeal to everyone. I think enjoying it might require a certain level of masochism on the part of the player.

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my kind of theory on video games is that they should go down relatively easy. no game overs, no bad endings, no way to truly fuck up. if you're trying to tell a story game overs not only break the flow but they make no sense. like in call of duty, you can die and restart 100 times on the way to your destination, but when you die 'for real' because the story prescribes it how is that supposed to be any more meaningful than the other 100 deaths? in a video game the only barrier to the best ending is your patience and willingness to restart. it's artificial. give me a story instead of wasting my time, i say.

of course there are some games i play specifically for the challenge such as shooters or the occasional puzzle game. i have fun with these games and they'll always have a place in my heart but i think to move forward games need to start empowering the player instead of abusing them. tim schafer said somewhere that games are about wish fulfilment and that makes a lot of sense to me.

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my kind of theory on video games is that they should go down relatively easy. no game overs, no bad endings, no way to truly fuck up. if you're trying to tell a story game overs not only break the flow but they make no sense. like in call of duty, you can die and restart 100 times on the way to your destination, but when you die 'for real' because the story prescribes it how is that supposed to be any more meaningful than the other 100 deaths? in a video game the only barrier to the best ending is your patience and willingness to restart. it's artificial. give me a story instead of wasting my time, i say.

of course there are some games i play specifically for the challenge such as shooters or the occasional puzzle game. i have fun with these games and they'll always have a place in my heart but i think to move forward games need to start empowering the player instead of abusing them. tim schafer said somewhere that games are about wish fulfilment and that makes a lot of sense to me.

I don't know, I think there's a place for both of them in modern games. They just please different crowds. For example, I dig permadeath in skill/reflex-based arcade action games. Knowing there's a risk of failure increases that euphoric feeling when you finally beat a difficult area.

On the other hand, sending you back to play through an hour of gameplay it in a heavily plot-based adventure game would just be poor design. Punishment for the sake of it. I definitely agree with you there.

That said, both of these types of games are equally valid. There are plenty of action-y shooters/puzzle titles that I feel are pushing boundaries and 'moving forward' just as much as the narrative driven ones are.

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I hope there continues to be a place for both types of games. I think gaming overall would suffer if there were no longer any games that truly challenged the player.

I don't exclusively play very difficult games, but sometimes I really crave that sort of difficulty. As of late, when I'm not playing La-Mulana, I'm probably playing Spelunky.

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I don't know, I think there's a place for both of them in modern games. They just please different crowds. For example, I dig permadeath in skill/reflex-based arcade action games. Knowing there's a risk of failure increases that euphoric feeling when you finally beat a difficult area.

On the other hand, sending you back to play through an hour of gameplay it in a heavily plot-based adventure game would just be poor design. Punishment for the sake of it. I definitely agree with you there.

That said, both of these types of games are equally valid. There are plenty of action-y shooters/puzzle titles that I feel are pushing boundaries and 'moving forward' just as much as the narrative driven ones are.

yeah i would agree that they both have a place. some games are skill based and not story-focused and that's ok too. i think maybe what i should say is that i think that storytelling in particular would improve by moving away from those kinds of mechanics. that's not to say good stories can't be told in a shooter or they can't improve in other departments such as gameplay. shooters and puzzle games will continue to evolve as well. heck, maybe i'm wrong and the 'citizen kane' of games will turn out to be a shooter. i'm not going to rule out anything.

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I beat Ducktales Remastered. The new ending level was fun and pretty challenging, the ending made me laugh, and this plays during the end credits.

LjcCxwtpIWE

I'd say it was more than worth my $15. 9/10. Would buy again!

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King of Dragon Pass on my iPad at the moment. It's basically like an old school text and still graphics game where you manage a tribe in a fantasy world. You grow crops and wage war and deal with random events that pop up. It's a ton of fun and probably one of the deepest games available on iOS.

I'm actually thinking it might be fun to create something similar in Twine.

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