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The third one really explains why Rufus doesn't really react to that sort of thing. Like, how he can just sit by and watch a guy get eaten alive by crabs and then go on with his life as if it were completely normal.

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Castlevania: Aria of Sorrow (I think that's what it's called) on the DS. And I'm stuck. Not due to difficulty - I just don't know what to do. Bah!

Also: five of these. Which five? You'll just have to wait and see...

EDIT: Wait. Did I say five? I meant SEVEN. Be very, very afraid...

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I tried to play more FTL again today and I still just do not understand this game. I want to like it. I love its spirit. But every time I play it and inevitably die due to some random, unpredictable sh!t, I just feel disappointed.

It's not even that I don't like roguelikes, because I do. I love Dungeons of Dredmor, to name one. Nor is it even that I dislike permadeath, because I like Spelunky, even though I suck at it. But the thing with DoD and Spelunky is that when I die and lose everything, I feel like it's because I made a bad choice or underperformed somehow.

Whenever I play FTL, I feel more like I'm playing some kind of weird Russian Roulette style of game. Every time I jump to a new location, I'm pulling the trigger on another chamber and hoping there's no bullet in there. But you can only luck out so man times. Inevitably FTL shoots you in the face, and that's the game.

I like all the little systems on the ship you can play with, which suggest that perhaps there is some strategy there, but any strategy that might have been offered by those systems is steamrolled into insignificance by the brutal and capricious "jump" button, which they could have just as easily called the "roll to see if you die" button. (Even comparing it to the old games it's inspired by, like Strange Adventures In Infinite Space, FTL is waaaay more d!ckish with these random events.)

My absolute most hated way to die in FTL though is when I press the "roll to see if you die" button and am forced into combat with a gigantic rebel/pirate ship that looks like it's far better equipped than me, and yet I man the shields and the weapons, target their O2 and weapon systems, and somehow win the fight against this huge ship. And I get an enormous scrap reward from it. But the battle also started a fire in the door control room near the narrow front of the ship. The fire knocks out the door controls, so I can't open the doors to vent the fire into space. Fire is pretty overpowered against being manually extinguished, so all your characters die trying to put out the fire. Possibly you could prevent their death by making them leave the fire and go to the med bay, but that doesn't work, because then the fire just destroys the entire ship while they're in there or else the fire has already knocked out the med bay so you can't use it. If an enemy ship starts a fire in the door control room, you're pretty much boned. Doesn't matter if you win the fight or not. Just hit the restart button.

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I tried to play more FTL again today and I still just do not understand this game. I want to like it. I love its spirit. But every time I play it and inevitably die due to some random, unpredictable sh!t, I just feel disappointed.

It's not even that I don't like roguelikes, because I do. I love Dungeons of Dredmor, to name one. Nor is it even that I dislike permadeath, because I like Spelunky, even though I suck at it. But the thing with DoD and Spelunky is that when I die and lose everything, I feel like it's because I made a bad choice or underperformed somehow.

Whenever I play FTL, I feel more like I'm playing some kind of weird Russian Roulette style of game. Every time I jump to a new location, I'm pulling the trigger on another chamber and hoping there's no bullet in there. But you can only luck out so man times. Inevitably FTL shoots you in the face, and that's the game.

I like all the little systems on the ship you can play with, which suggest that perhaps there is some strategy there, but any strategy that might have been offered by those systems is steamrolled into insignificance by the brutal and capricious "jump" button, which they could have just as easily called the "roll to see if you die" button. (Even comparing it to the old games it's inspired by, like Strange Adventures In Infinite Space, FTL is waaaay more d!ckish with these random events.)

My absolute most hated way to die in FTL though is when I press the "roll to see if you die" button and am forced into combat with a gigantic rebel/pirate ship that looks like it's far better equipped than me, and yet I man the shields and the weapons, target their O2 and weapon systems, and somehow win the fight against this huge ship. And I get an enormous scrap reward from it. But the battle also started a fire in the door control room near the narrow front of the ship. The fire knocks out the door controls, so I can't open the doors to vent the fire into space. Fire is pretty overpowered against being manually extinguished, so all your characters die trying to put out the fire. Possibly you could prevent their death by making them leave the fire and go to the med bay, but that doesn't work, because then the fire just destroys the entire ship while they're in there or else the fire has already knocked out the med bay so you can't use it. If an enemy ship starts a fire in the door control room, you're pretty much boned. Doesn't matter if you win the fight or not. Just hit the restart button.

Question. What difficulty mode are you playing it on? Normal or easy? Easy is the mode you want to be on for FTL.

Also fire isn't that difficult if you can multitask. The moment you see the fire, press spacebar to pause the game and get the doors up ASAP. If not, the rockmen are immune to fire so it's best to have at least one on your team when you can.

I've beaten the game at least 3 times. You just gotta know how to multitask, and when a battle is just too much so you can leave.

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I tried to play more FTL again today and I still just do not understand this game. I want to like it. I love its spirit. But every time I play it and inevitably die due to some random, unpredictable sh!t, I just feel disappointed.

It's not even that I don't like roguelikes, because I do. I love Dungeons of Dredmor, to name one. Nor is it even that I dislike permadeath, because I like Spelunky, even though I suck at it. But the thing with DoD and Spelunky is that when I die and lose everything, I feel like it's because I made a bad choice or underperformed somehow.

Whenever I play FTL, I feel more like I'm playing some kind of weird Russian Roulette style of game. Every time I jump to a new location, I'm pulling the trigger on another chamber and hoping there's no bullet in there. But you can only luck out so man times. Inevitably FTL shoots you in the face, and that's the game.

I like all the little systems on the ship you can play with, which suggest that perhaps there is some strategy there, but any strategy that might have been offered by those systems is steamrolled into insignificance by the brutal and capricious "jump" button, which they could have just as easily called the "roll to see if you die" button. (Even comparing it to the old games it's inspired by, like Strange Adventures In Infinite Space, FTL is waaaay more d!ckish with these random events.)

My absolute most hated way to die in FTL though is when I press the "roll to see if you die" button and am forced into combat with a gigantic rebel/pirate ship that looks like it's far better equipped than me, and yet I man the shields and the weapons, target their O2 and weapon systems, and somehow win the fight against this huge ship. And I get an enormous scrap reward from it. But the battle also started a fire in the door control room near the narrow front of the ship. The fire knocks out the door controls, so I can't open the doors to vent the fire into space. Fire is pretty overpowered against being manually extinguished, so all your characters die trying to put out the fire. Possibly you could prevent their death by making them leave the fire and go to the med bay, but that doesn't work, because then the fire just destroys the entire ship while they're in there or else the fire has already knocked out the med bay so you can't use it. If an enemy ship starts a fire in the door control room, you're pretty much boned. Doesn't matter if you win the fight or not. Just hit the restart button.

Question. What difficulty mode are you playing it on? Normal or easy? Easy is the mode you want to be on for FTL.

Also fire isn't that difficult if you can multitask. The moment you see the fire, press spacebar to pause the game and get the doors up ASAP. If not, the rockmen are immune to fire so it's best to have at least one on your team when you can.

I've beaten the game at least 3 times. You just gotta know how to multitask, and when a battle is just too much so you can leave.

I've been playing on Normal difficulty without using pause. I guess I should just play it on easy, but if that's the way to get the optimal experience, then they f***ed up their normal mode.

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I just beat La-Mulana, including the optional Hell Temple.

And it only took me forever to do.

Hell Temple was, predictably enough, hell. The normal last boss of the game wasn't too bad at all in comparison.

What's so hard about Hell Temple? This gif might sum it up:

C62ADD4A1F0DEE76E6866C55D74FF53764D6A039

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Well, I finally beat Alice Madness Returns.

I could call the story a bit disjointed, and I could talk at length about how tedious the gameplay was feeling by the end of it, with every interesting new concept it introduced seeming to overstay it's welcome, but...

setting.jpg?w=604

4678935-alice-i-horrorland--.jpg

I think I'd rather just take a moment to admire the art direction a bit longer...

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Well, I finally beat Alice Madness Returns.

That game is beautiful.

The thing that makes the game feel like a bit of a long, tedious slog by the time you reach the end is that the levels tend to be RIDICULOUSLY LONG without any sort of discernible save/rest/bookmark place. It just goes on and on and on.

The actual game length isn't longer than a typical game, and there is actually a lot of variation in the gameplay compared to some other games. (God of War has less variation than Alice, for example.) I don't think it's the overall length or that the gameplay needed some extra variety. I'm firmly convinced that it is absolutely the level/chapter length.

I still love that game, though. I've beaten it several times and I still think it's a fun game to just kill time with. And beautiful.

AND OH MY GOD DAT HAIR PHYSICS.

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I tried to play more FTL again today and I still just do not understand this game. I want to like it. I love its spirit. But every time I play it and inevitably die due to some random, unpredictable sh!t, I just feel disappointed.

It's not even that I don't like roguelikes, because I do. I love Dungeons of Dredmor, to name one. Nor is it even that I dislike permadeath, because I like Spelunky, even though I suck at it. But the thing with DoD and Spelunky is that when I die and lose everything, I feel like it's because I made a bad choice or underperformed somehow.

Whenever I play FTL, I feel more like I'm playing some kind of weird Russian Roulette style of game. Every time I jump to a new location, I'm pulling the trigger on another chamber and hoping there's no bullet in there. But you can only luck out so man times. Inevitably FTL shoots you in the face, and that's the game.

I like all the little systems on the ship you can play with, which suggest that perhaps there is some strategy there, but any strategy that might have been offered by those systems is steamrolled into insignificance by the brutal and capricious "jump" button, which they could have just as easily called the "roll to see if you die" button. (Even comparing it to the old games it's inspired by, like Strange Adventures In Infinite Space, FTL is waaaay more d!ckish with these random events.)

My absolute most hated way to die in FTL though is when I press the "roll to see if you die" button and am forced into combat with a gigantic rebel/pirate ship that looks like it's far better equipped than me, and yet I man the shields and the weapons, target their O2 and weapon systems, and somehow win the fight against this huge ship. And I get an enormous scrap reward from it. But the battle also started a fire in the door control room near the narrow front of the ship. The fire knocks out the door controls, so I can't open the doors to vent the fire into space. Fire is pretty overpowered against being manually extinguished, so all your characters die trying to put out the fire. Possibly you could prevent their death by making them leave the fire and go to the med bay, but that doesn't work, because then the fire just destroys the entire ship while they're in there or else the fire has already knocked out the med bay so you can't use it. If an enemy ship starts a fire in the door control room, you're pretty much boned. Doesn't matter if you win the fight or not. Just hit the restart button.

Question. What difficulty mode are you playing it on? Normal or easy? Easy is the mode you want to be on for FTL.

Also fire isn't that difficult if you can multitask. The moment you see the fire, press spacebar to pause the game and get the doors up ASAP. If not, the rockmen are immune to fire so it's best to have at least one on your team when you can.

I've beaten the game at least 3 times. You just gotta know how to multitask, and when a battle is just too much so you can leave.

I've been playing on Normal difficulty without using pause. I guess I should just play it on easy, but if that's the way to get the optimal experience, then they f***ed up their normal mode.

They did. "Easy" should be "Normal" and "Normal" should be "Hard".

Also you are supposed to be using pause, so that's another issue. You can set up a gameplan in pause, even issue the orders, and get immediate reactions for easier multitasking. It's practically mandatory for the final boss to use that feature.

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Well, I finally beat Alice Madness Returns.

That game is beautiful.

The thing that makes the game feel like a bit of a long, tedious slog by the time you reach the end is that the levels tend to be RIDICULOUSLY LONG without any sort of discernible save/rest/bookmark place. It just goes on and on and on.

The actual game length isn't longer than a typical game, and there is actually a lot of variation in the gameplay compared to some other games. (God of War has less variation than Alice, for example.) I don't think it's the overall length or that the gameplay needed some extra variety. I'm firmly convinced that it is absolutely the level/chapter length.

I still love that game, though. I've beaten it several times and I still think it's a fun game to just kill time with. And beautiful.

AND OH MY GOD DAT HAIR PHYSICS.

Perhaps it's something that shouldn't be marathoned all at once then.

There were some great bits where everything came together, like first flying onto the bridge made of cards, and wandering through the asylum. But the longer I stayed in a new area the longer it seemed that some places were boiling down to jumping from one frustratingly extensive series of timed platforms to another.

Bits like throwing the doll-head down the chute could be a nice change of pace, but even that wore on me by its sixth obstacle course.

More blending with the story and gameplay may have helped. A few more transitions to the real world would give a chance to build up the villain too, and maybe characterize Alice beyond cynicism and anger.

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Perhaps it's something that shouldn't be marathoned all at once then.

There were some great bits where everything came together, like first flying onto the bridge made of cards, and wandering through the asylum. But the longer I stayed in a new area the longer it seemed that some places were boiling down to jumping from one frustratingly extensive series of timed platforms to another.

Bits like throwing the doll-head down the chute could be a nice change of pace, but even that wore on me by its sixth obstacle course.

More blending with the story and gameplay may have helped. A few more transitions to the real world would give a chance to build up the villain too, and maybe characterize Alice beyond cynicism and anger.

Really? I didn't really care that much for the story. After a while, I started skipping all the cutscenes I could. And the bits in the real world were sometimes visually amazing, but they were very tedious additions to the game. I hate when games do stuff like that. Sort of like when you play some modern shooters and the game will override its own rules and arbitrarily turn off all controls as well as the ability to run so that all you can do is slowly walk, thereby forcing your character to walk slowly so that a dialogue can run its course (Gears of War is notorious for this crutch). And then you have a similar situation with a game like Alice that has a "gameplay" in the real world, only it's not gameplay, because all you're doing is walking, walking, walking. It's like a cutscene that you have to keep pressing forward for it to end. It's this bizarre middle place where it's slightly more interactive than a cutscene (if holding forward on the joystick until it's over counts as "interaction") but it's vastly more boring than the actual gameplay. To me, those sections are similar to Gears of War arbitrarily turning off all of your controls except for the ability to walk. Rather than taking away your gameplay entirely and forcing you to watch a cutscene, they take away all of your gameplay except for the ability to hold forward on the joystick. Is that better? Is that improvement? It's certainly DIFFERENT, and if different is better, then perhaps? But I think it is just the same old problem pretending not to be the same old problem.

What would have made those sections a lot better is if, in addition to being a transition to the "real world" instead of the fantasy world, you also got a gameplay transition as well. Other games have done this sort of thing before with tremendous results. Remember the original Paper Mario on the Nintendo 64, where sometimes the game would transition AWAY from Mario, the overworld, and the primary gameplay mechanics? And instead you would briefly play a segment as Princess Peach? She was in her own setting where Mario couldn't go (at least not until the very, very end), but she didn't just walk around. She had her own gameplay, and it had a unique twist every time one of her segments came up. And she could find things and put them in a special box that Mario could retrieve out in the world.

Now take that idea and imagine that real-world Alice had her own, unique gameplay. Something more investigative. And she could put what she found in a special box that fantasy Alice could find. And imagine that fantasy Alice can't go to the real world just like Mario can't go to the castle. UNTIL THE END. Maybe the whole story, fantasy-alice's final castle is the real world. She's working her way there all the time, trying to fuse her two selves back together, like a metaphor for her struggling to regain sanity. I don't feel the least bit arrogant for saying I actually think that if AliceMR wanted more emphasis on storytelling, that would have been better than what AliceMR actually did.

I didn't mind all the jumping around from one platform to another. It's at heart a 3D platformer, which is a genre I dearly miss. Remember Banjo-Kazooie? Come back to us, Banjo-Kazooie! Come baaaaack!

*edit*

Re: FTL

I switched to easy and used pause. The scrap rewards are better and the pause lets you respond more easily/accurately, but it's still somehow just as annoying as sh*t as it is in normal mode. I somehow feel like I SHOULD like FTL, but trying to find things to like feels like work. The whole time I'm playing, I feel like I'd rather be doing something else. In fact, I'm gonna go play Strange Adventures In Infinite Space. Same game with less bullsh*t.

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Currently on the breeding run of a Lucario. Right now I'm just trying to catch a female Riolu with a Luxary ball so that transfers to all the eggs for easier evolution.

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Really? I didn't really care that much for the story. After a while, I started skipping all the cutscenes I could. And the bits in the real world were sometimes visually amazing, but they were very tedious additions to the game. I hate when games do stuff like that.

I wasn't saying the story was much to write home about. I just thought it had the potential to be more interesting if there was a more seamless intermarriage between the narrative and the gameplay rather than completely jumping from one to the other.

I mean, several worlds reflected different people and conflicts that Alice was dealing with. They could have built on that more.

Sort of like when you play some modern shooters and the game will override its own rules and arbitrarily turn off all controls as well as the ability to run so that all you can do is slowly walk, thereby forcing your character to walk slowly so that a dialogue can run its course (Gears of War is notorious for this crutch). And then you have a similar situation with a game like Alice that has a "gameplay" in the real world, only it's not gameplay, because all you're doing is walking, walking, walking. It's like a cutscene that you have to keep pressing forward for it to end. It's this bizarre middle place where it's slightly more interactive than a cutscene (if holding forward on the joystick until it's over counts as "interaction") but it's vastly more boring than the actual gameplay.

Well, I can't defend GOW, but I don't think there's zero merit to the idea. Like Spec Ops: The Line's take on it, building atmosphere by forcing you into the position of a wounded man slogging through a war zone that you perpetuated.

But an issue with Alice's real world was how non-interactive the city was. It's slow-paced, and there isn't really anyone or anything to find from walking around, so it doesn't give as much of an impression of a exploring a living city as it could have.

Now take that idea and imagine that real-world Alice had her own, unique gameplay. Something more investigative. And she could put what she found in a special box that fantasy Alice could find. And imagine that fantasy Alice can't go to the real world just like Mario can't go to the castle. UNTIL THE END. Maybe the whole story, fantasy-alice's final castle is the real world. She's working her way there all the time, trying to fuse her two selves back together, like a metaphor for her struggling to regain sanity. I don't feel the least bit arrogant for saying I actually think that if AliceMR wanted more emphasis on storytelling, that would have been better than what AliceMR actually did.

I didn't mind all the jumping around from one platform to another. It's at heart a 3D platformer, which is a genre I dearly miss. Remember Banjo-Kazooie? Come back to us, Banjo-Kazooie! Come baaaaack!

That's the kind of idea I mean. Have more of an impact from the two different worlds increasingly building upon each other to bridge the disparity between them.

I still appreciate the platforming callback, and the lovely visuals it brought to it, but I can't deny when some things started to feel like a grind.

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Really? I didn't really care that much for the story. After a while, I started skipping all the cutscenes I could. And the bits in the real world were sometimes visually amazing, but they were very tedious additions to the game. I hate when games do stuff like that.

I wasn't saying the story was much to write home about. I just thought it had the potential to be more interesting if there was a more seamless intermarriage between the narrative and the gameplay rather than completely jumping from one to the other.

I mean, several worlds reflected different people and conflicts that Alice was dealing with. They could have built on that more.

Sort of like when you play some modern shooters and the game will override its own rules and arbitrarily turn off all controls as well as the ability to run so that all you can do is slowly walk, thereby forcing your character to walk slowly so that a dialogue can run its course (Gears of War is notorious for this crutch). And then you have a similar situation with a game like Alice that has a "gameplay" in the real world, only it's not gameplay, because all you're doing is walking, walking, walking. It's like a cutscene that you have to keep pressing forward for it to end. It's this bizarre middle place where it's slightly more interactive than a cutscene (if holding forward on the joystick until it's over counts as "interaction") but it's vastly more boring than the actual gameplay.

Well, I can't defend GOW, but I don't think there's zero merit to the idea. Like Spec Ops: The Line's take on it, building atmosphere by forcing you into the position of a wounded man slogging through a war zone that you perpetuated.

But an issue with Alice's real world was how non-interactive the city was. It's slow-paced, and there isn't really anyone or anything to find from walking around, so it doesn't give as much of an impression of a exploring a living city as it could have.

Now take that idea and imagine that real-world Alice had her own, unique gameplay. Something more investigative. And she could put what she found in a special box that fantasy Alice could find. And imagine that fantasy Alice can't go to the real world just like Mario can't go to the castle. UNTIL THE END. Maybe the whole story, fantasy-alice's final castle is the real world. She's working her way there all the time, trying to fuse her two selves back together, like a metaphor for her struggling to regain sanity. I don't feel the least bit arrogant for saying I actually think that if AliceMR wanted more emphasis on storytelling, that would have been better than what AliceMR actually did.

I didn't mind all the jumping around from one platform to another. It's at heart a 3D platformer, which is a genre I dearly miss. Remember Banjo-Kazooie? Come back to us, Banjo-Kazooie! Come baaaaack!

That's the kind of idea I mean. Have more of an impact from the two different worlds increasingly building upon each other to bridge the disparity between them.

I still appreciate the platforming callback, and the lovely visuals it brought to it, but I can't deny when some things started to feel like a grind.

I don't want to not reply and make it seem like I was disregarding your post, but all I really have to say to it is, "Oh! Okay then."

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I'm still playing DA:O... but when I'm not, I'm modding Skyrim for my next playthrough. My most recent addition was Frostfall, because Gopher's review talked me into it.

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I'm still playing DA:O... but when I'm not, I'm modding Skyrim for my next playthrough. My most recent addition was Frostfall, because Gopher's review talked me into it.

Can never go wrong with Dragon Age: Origins. Still possibly my top game of all time, and has a fantastic set of mods out there for it.

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Well, I haven't leveled high enough to make choosing a Rogue Archer as my primary quite worth it. I keep finding myself yelling at the screen because the monsters are hard. However, I hear that once I level my archery skills high enough it should be worth it. Also, I recently added the Combat Tweaks mod just to make getting my archer through the Fade by himself actually playable because I kept getting slaughtered by mages.

Next time, I'll play as a mage.

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I wish I could reset my play time numbers on my Steam profile. My numbers are wildly inaccurate.

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I wish I could reset my play time numbers on my Steam profile. My numbers are wildly inaccurate.

Me too. I have a similar issue with both Steam and Raptr, but oh well.

Combat Tweaks is fantastic, love that mod. I also really enjoyed the dynamic 'shared potion cooldowns' added to the tactical aspect. The game always felt too easy with being able to just spam consumables whenever.

Do you use Dragon Age Redesigned? Probably my favorite general tweak to DA:O. Also, everything by Jake Zahn is simply fantastic, especially the Class and Specialization Pack. That brought an entire new life to Dragon Age for me.

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Although Dark Souls is calling after me, my work schedule just isn't allowing it (yay working overtime for my day job and still maintaining freelance work too!).

So I've mainly been playing Thomas Was Alone when I can spare the time.

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Although Dark Souls is calling after me, my work schedule just isn't allowing it (yay working overtime for my day job and still maintaining freelance work too!).

So I've mainly been playing Thomas Was Alone when I can spare the time.

Great game. That reminds me that I still need to finish that one. But that may have to wait because....

...friend loaned me a copy of Twilight Princess FOR GAMECUBE. I've been looking for one but was having a hell of a time finding one. I could never get into the game on the Wii because I am not a huge fan of the Wii controller. I could do the Wii controls, but I hated how they felt. They were driving me bonkers. Eventually stopped playing for that reason.

But now? Real controls? Actual controls WITH A CAMERA STICK AND EVERYTHING?!?!

Zelda time until further notice.

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I don't want to not reply and make it seem like I was disregarding your post, but all I really have to say to it is, "Oh! Okay then."

...To each his own?

Although Dark Souls is calling after me, my work schedule just isn't allowing it (yay working overtime for my day job and still maintaining freelance work too!).

I enjoyed Dark Souls once I semi-got the hang of it, but it was a huge time-sink for me.

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FF6.

Currently playing Castlevania: Aria of Sorrow on the GBA. Well, [del]on my tablet through a GBA emulator[/del] TOTALLY ON A GBA. Fun game, even if not being able to do a slide-kick is kind of weird.

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Wait, Marsden, you actually play video games?!

Oh he plays them. I would be shocked if he finishes them though.

Hush, you. I play games. Games that should never exist. So many unholy titles that your mind would melt if you knew of them.

...so naturally the plan is to review one a day next week, provided I can get them done in time. :D

(Might not happen - I have just pissed away an entire evening doing bugger all. Back to my old tricks then)

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Since I'm planning on going to the Day of the Devs event next month, I've been trying to finish playing through all of the Double Fine games I hadn't gotten through yet. Been playing Iron Brigade and working on finishing Stacking.

And *sigh* Final Fantasy VI and Baldur's Gate are both on my backlog as well, would love to tackle those sometime, since I love both the Final Fantasy series and Bioware games.

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I don't want to not reply and make it seem like I was disregarding your post, but all I really have to say to it is, "Oh! Okay then."

...To each his own?

Although Dark Souls is calling after me, my work schedule just isn't allowing it (yay working overtime for my day job and still maintaining freelance work too!).

I enjoyed Dark Souls once I semi-got the hang of it, but it was a huge time-sink for me.

Oh man, I loved Dark Souls.

To be honest, I HATED DARK SOULS for a very long time. I never played Demon Souls, so it was my first foray into that franchise. I did not understand it. It didn't appear to be following the rules. It didn't want to court me the way modern games so often court their players. It seemed to actively hate me. It was torturous. I forced myself to keep playing it, but I wasn't sure I was actually enjoying it.

I think once I finally figured out how to beat that giant Minotaur boss on the bridge, something in me just clicked. I understood the game all of a sudden, and from there I was no longer forcing myself to play it, but I was genuinely hooked.

I feel like Dark Souls is like our modern day Ghouls n' Ghosts.

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